News Briefs

News Briefs
Kelsey Baldwin plays guitar and sings Easter hymns at the Fort Smith recreation centre last Tuesday as part of the Anglican Church’s Easter celebration lunches held on three separate days last week.Photo: Maria Church.

Briefs include: Métis win court appeak, obtain Indian rights under Constitution, Alberta puts Gladue Reports in the hands of Native Councelling Services, and Fédération franco-ténoise appoints new director.

Métis win court appeal, obtain Indian rights under Constitution

Métis people have Indian rights under the Canadian Constitution, according to the Federal Court of Appeal. The court announced its landmark decision Thursday, upholding an earlier court decision in 2013 and tying up a case that began in 1999 when Harry Daniels, former Congress of Aboriginal Peoples’ leader, took the federal government to court over the rights of Métis and non-status Indians, though the federal court’s decision did not grant the same rights to non-status Indians. The federal government has spent $9 million fighting the Harry Daniels case.

From left, Daryl Grundy, Ruth Harrold and Tanya Vyse snack on tuna and egg salad sandwiches during the Easter gathering Tuesday.

Photo: Maria Church

From left, Daryl Grundy, Ruth Harrold and Tanya Vyse snack on tuna and egg salad sandwiches during the Easter gathering Tuesday.

Alberta puts Gladue Reports in the hands of Native Counselling Services

The government of Alberta has announced new funding and changes to Gladue Reports – a criminal sentencing option for Aboriginals created by the Supreme Court of Canada – that will see the responsibility for the reports in the hands of the Native Counselling Services, instead of a government department. The government touted the $200,000 funding and change of responsibility as a progressive step for the Alberta justice system that will see more “cultural support” for Aboriginal people to help decrease their chances of re-offending.

Fédération franco-ténoise appoints new director

Jean de Dieu Tuyishime has been appointed the new director of the Fédération franco-ténoise (FFT). Previously the acting director, Tuyishime’s appointment was announced at the community forum in Yellowknife last week in front of representatives from all NWT francophone agencies. Tuyishime previously held the position of French NWT Health Network coordinator before moving to the FFT where he has been working for the last 10 years. FFT representatives praised Tuyishime following his appointment, saying the acting director was the best candidate for the position and brought the organization stability after it recently saw two CEOs leave on short notice.

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