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Europe trip lands new investments in NWT satellite facility A recent trip to Europe by NWT ofcials secured addi- tional investment in Inuviks burgeoning remote sensing satellite facility. See page 7. U.S. Olympic gold medal soccer player visits the NWT U.S. gold medal winning soc- cer player Lori Lindsey toured the NWT last week to inspire localathletestoworkhardand follow their dreams. See page 21. SOLSTICE SPLASH Paddlers celebrate the longest day of the year on the Slave River. See page 20. Cree music album aims to inspire language learners A first-of-its-kind musical compilation in the Cree lan- guage launched for free on- line on Aboriginal Day June 21 in the NWT. See page 15. Fort Smith youth get sense of self at culture camps Elementary school students learned all about traditional Aboriginal cultural activities at the annual JBT Culture Camp last week. See pages 12-13. V IS IT W W W .N O R J.C A A national award winning independent newspaper serving northern Alberta and the Northwest Territories since 1977 1.00 June 23 2015 Vol. 39 No. 8 Independent watchdog set up for Giant Mine By MEAGAN WOHLBERG Afteryearsofnegotiationalegally binding agreement that establishes independent oversight for the clean- up of Yellowknifes Giant Mine was nalized last week. The new Environmental Agree- ment for the defunct gold mine that is currently undergoing taxpayer- funded remediation was signed on Wednesday by the Yellowknives Dene First Nation City of Yellow- knife Alternatives North the North Slave Mtis Alliance and both the federal and territorial government. Kevin OReilly a signatory to the agreement on behalf of Alternatives North said the arrangement has been a long time coming. This is something Ive been working on for about 15 or 20 years said OReilly letting out a laugh. But its not just me I think theres a lot of people in the community who have been concerned about multiple roles and responsibilities particularly of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Can- ada AANDC. The agreement guarantees in- dependent oversight of the feder- ally managed remediation project The body which will receive an- nual funding from the Canadian government will review ongo- ing remediation operations and manage research on a permanent solution to the 237000 tonnes through the hearings process to the reviewboardwhoeventuallyincluded the creation of the watchdog as one of its 26 binding recommendations for AANDCs Giant Mine remedia- tion team in its 2003 report. OReillysaidindependentoversight wasalwaysaconcernforAlternatives Northandtheotherpartiesatthetable becauseofthemanyconictingroles heldbyAANDCwhichwasessentially boththeregulatorandtheproponent throughout the review process. Themessshallwesaywasallowed tohappenundertheirwatchthenthe same department inherited this site and became responsible for manag- ing and attempting to remediate the site.Whiledoingthattheywerecar- rying out inspections of themselves thesameministerreceivedthereport from the review board will eventu- ally sign off on a water licence and theyhavetocomeupwiththemoney for this OReilly said. See Body on page 3. through the establishment of an independent not-for-prot body of experts appointed by the signatories to the agreement. The signatories have 45 days from the effective date to appoint their representatives. of toxic arsenic trioxide stored underground. The call to establish independent oversight was brought forward to AANDC prior to the environmental assessment process and then again We felt in the interest of transparency accountability and ensuring better commu- nications and so on that having somebody independent watch what is happening is a good idea. Kevin OReilly Alternatives North PhotoDaliCarmichaelopment NEHIYAWNIKAMONAKOYOYOWAKOHCINANASKOMOWIN NWTCreeLanguageProgram EducationCultureEconomicDevelopment Raylene Powder centre dazzled her way into rst place at the Fort Smith Aboriginal Day traditional dress competition with Henry Beaver right in second and Fuzzy Victor Marie in third. For more pictures from the communitys weekend-long celebration head to pages 10 11. 2 Tuesday June 23 2015 POLITICS LABOUR NEWS BRIEFS Burned Polaris apartments without sprinkler systems re marshal The Yellowknife Polaris apartments that went up in ames on June 14 did not have sprinkler systems installed said NWT re marshal Chucker Dewar a factor that could have saved the structure from some of the extensive damage it suffered. The building was built before current legislation requiring sprinklers was enacted thus the sprinklers were notmandatory.Investigatorshaveconcludedthedamageis too extensive to reach a conclusive cause for the re. Philip Blake holds onto chief position in Tsiigehtchic band election The Gwichya Gwichin Band in the far northern char- ter community of Tsiigehtchic held its municipal elec- tions last week with incumbent Philip Blake holding on to his top position as chief. Following election day on June 15 results showed Blake is joined in the local government by councillors Shelley Andre Charlene Blake and John Norbert. Two aircrafts involved in fatal crash near Fort McMurray Two people are deceased following a mid-air collision that tookplacebetweentwosmallairplanesinnorthernAlberta thisweekend.Atapproximately800p.m.onJune21Wood BuffaloRegionalEmergencyServicesreceivedareportofthe crash in the skies east of Fort McMurray. One of the planes was able to land safely the pilot alone and uninjured. Fol- lowinganairsearchthesecondaircraftwaslocateditstwo occupants conrmed dead. The Transport Safety Board of Canada has been contacted to investigate the incident. 926 MACKENZIE HIGHWAY HAY RIVER NT 867-874-2771 Toll Free 1-866-327-0717 www.monsterrec.com PLUS A great selection of outboard motors are on sale now OUFITTER SERIES 16 AND 18 FEET Appraised at 515000 asking 499000 Centrally located 6 car parking 3 complete private suites double lot Brand new furnace plumbing and electrical all new windows totally renovated hardwood throughout main floor All appliances and furniture are negotiable. Turn-key operation live in one suite and rent the others or operate a bed and breakfast. TRIPLEX FOR SALE 28 Cumming Avenue Fort Smith NT Email ruth_ rolfehotmail.com for enquiries or to set up a viewing. Striking workers vote to reject latest offer from Town of Hay River By MEAGAN WOHLBERG Hay River residents hop- ing the ongoing municipal strike would be over last week were sorely disap- pointed after striking work- ers rejected the latest offer by the town saying they want a deal similar to other contracts signed recently in the territory. Mayor and council had upped their offer to an an- nual wage increase of 1.7 per cent at the most recent talks betweenthedisputingparties earlier this month. On Wednesday night the unions bargaining team brought the offer to the mem- bersforavote.Theprocessin- volvedasecretballotwherein over two-thirds of the mem- bership rejected the offer. According to Union of Northern Workers president Todd Parsons the workers are looking for parity with other collective agreements signed recently in the NWT. Recent agreements with the Village of Fort Simpson Fort Smith Housing Author- ity and AVENS A Commu- nity for Seniors have all pro- duced wage settlements of two per cent per year or bet- ter Parsons said. Yet this employer refuses to bend in reaching a similar reason- able settlement. Mayor Andrew Cassidy said the 1.7 per cent offer was just up for grabs on the condition that the members would vote on it. Now that the offer has been rejected he said negotiations wont fall back to square one - that is the original offer of a 1 per cent annual increase - but did say the current offer on the table for the workers is now back to 1.55 per cent where it had been left off previously. That 1.55 per cent is back on the table and open for ac- ceptance Cassidy said. Though the offer was to be immediately taken to the collective agreement is the wage increase. The union which has been requesting a 2.25-2.5 per cent increaseoverthethreeyearsof thecollectiveagreementwhich expiredinDecember2013said itcontinuestourgethetownto soften its hardline position. While our negotiations have fallen through our the members for a vote fol- lowing the latest round of negotiations on June 1 the union balked after the town refused to sign a back to work agreement that would guarantee job security for all of the workers. According to Cassidy that return to work agreement has since been hashed out and all thats left to negotiate in members are still condent we can find the common ground necessary to reach an agreement said Jack Bourassa regional execu- tive vice president for PSAC North. Town of Hay River workers will stand together until we reach a fair and rea- sonable deal. Bourassa said dates for fu- turenegotiationsarepending. Recent agreements with the Village of Fort Simpson Fort Smith Housing Authority and AVENS A Community for Seniors have all produced wage settlements of two per cent per year or better. Todd Parsons Union of Northern Workers PhotoDaliCarmichael Union signs line the highway into Hay River where municipal workers have been on strike since February. Tuesday June 23 2015 3 ENVIRONMENT OVERSIGHT cascade graphics New solutions. Call us at 867.872.3000 Email us at graphicsnorj.ca or designnorj.ca or simply drop-in at 207 McDougal Rd Fort Smith NT TIRE NORTH LTD. 917 MACKENZIE HWY. SS 22 HAY RIVER NT X0E 0R8 867 874-2686 DAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEDAZZLEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVEWHILE YOU DRIVE Body to research permanent solution for Giant Mines underground arsenic Continued from page 1. So we thought its just too many roles and responsibilities within one department and we felt in the interest of transparency accountability and ensuring better commu- nications and so on that having somebody independent watch what is happening is a good idea OReilly said. Apart from the monitoring and manage- ment of water air quality wildlife aquatic life and mine waste the environmental plan also includes a provision for the development of a perpetual care plan for the mine and the underground arsenic currently slated to be frozen in perpetuity or until technological advances allow for an alternative clean-up solution. In order to facilitate nding a permanent solutionforthearsenictheoversightbodywill be charged with researching and producing information on new technologies and to make that information public. Research funding is set at 175000 per year until 2020 when it will be increased to 250000 each year until the agreement is terminated. The body will also be given an operating budget of 650000 a year. Those funds are anticipated to pay for a permanent location and staff members to be able to carry out the mandate of the agency. We tried to provide certainty around fund- ing without burdening them with reporting or them having to negotiate their budget on a yearly basis OReilly said. Though organizations still have to decide who their appointees will be OReilly said the group would likely coordinate their selections to ensure a broad cross-section of expertise. He said the basic logistical work will hope- fully be done to allow the organization to get started work by the fall. Im quite optimistic. Its a fairly compre- hensive arrangement with a lot of checks and balances OReilly said. PhotocourtesyofAlternativesNorth Getting a Head Start Pre-schoolers from Salt River First Nations Aboriginal Head Start program in Fort Smith celebrate their graduation last Thursday afternoon at Queen Elizabeth Park. Kevin OReilly of Alternatives North left Chief Ernest Betsina of the Yellowknives Dene First Nation and Yellowknife Mayor Mark Heyck sign the environmental agreement for the Giant Mine remediation last week in Yellowknife. PhotoDonJaque 4 Tuesday June 23 2015 The Northern Journal is an independent newspaper covering news and events in the western Arctic and northern Alberta. 2013 CCNA BLUE RIBBON CANADIAN COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER AWARD 2013 C M C A AUDITED The Northern Journal is published weekly by Cascade Publishing Ltd. Printed at Star Press Inc. Wainwright AB. Publisher................................................................................. Don Jaque 867-872-3000 ext.21 donnorj.ca Editor.........................................................................Meagan Wohlberg 867-872-3000 ext.24 newsnorj.ca Reporter....................................................................... Dali Carmichael 867-872-3000 ext.25 reporternorj.ca Comptroller ..................................................... Dixie Penner 867-872-3000 ext.23 dixnorj.ca Advertising.............................. Heather Foubert Hay River 867-874-4106 adsnorj.ca Administration............................................Jeremy Turcotte 867-872-3000 ext.26 adminnorj.ca Production Manager ......................................Sandra Jaque 867-872-3000 ext.22 sandranorj.ca Graphics........................................................Paul Bannister 867-872-3000 ext.27 graphicsnorj.ca Letters to the Editor Policy The Northern Journal welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and include a phone number so the author can be veried. Names will be withheld on request in special circumstances where the reasons are determined to be valid. The Journal reserves the right to edit letters for length libel clarity and taste. Opinions expressed in letters and columns are not necessarily those of the publisher or editor. Advertising Deadlines Display ad deadline is Thursday at 400 p.m. Classied ad deadline is Thursday at 500 p.m. Email adsnorj.ca Subscription Rates Prices include GST. 47.25 in Fort Smith 52.50 elsewhere in Canada 105 in the USA overseas 164.30. EDITORIAL COLUMN InlastweeksstoryFortSmithpullstogetheraftertragiccaraccidentitwasincorrectlynoted that an additional passenger was sent by medevac to Edmonton. That passenger was treated for injuries and remained at the Fort Smith Health Centre overnight. FurthermoreintheJune8storyNewshlimitsforLittleBuffaloRivernotenoughMtis it was incorrectly reported that previous limits for Walleye from June 7 to March 31 for the 200809seasonwereadailycatchandpossessionlimitofthreeandverespectively.Infact itwasalimitofoneandtwo.AswellthereareveFisheriesandOceansofcerscurrentlysta- tionedintheNWTnottwoaswasreportedbyasource.TheJournalapologizesfortheseerrors. CORRECTIONS June is Stroke Month By GARETT RICHARDSON Public Health Promotion Facilitator Alberta Health Services One Canadian suffers a stroke every nine minutes. Knowing the signs and symptoms of a stroke are important for early interven- tion. Thinking and acting quick at the rst sign of stroke can have major impacts on a patients recovery. The Heart and Stroke Foundation wants all Albertans to know the acronym FAST Face is it drooping Arms can you raise both Speech is it slurred or jumbled Time call 9-1-1 immediately Keeping these four steps in mind can be the difference between life and death in the event of a stroke. Knowing the risk factors is also important. Some of the risk factors for stroke are things we cant control like family history gender and age. But others including stress high blood pressure or cholesterol diabetes being overweight physical inactivity poor diet and tobacco use can be managed to help reduce the risk. There are many things you can do to lower your risk of stroke. Try going for a walk after dinner or during coffee breaks at work. Re- ducing the amount of time you spend sitting is a great start to an active lifestyle. Eating a diet that follows Canadas Food Guide is also recommended. Increasing the number of fruits and vegetables you eat is always a good thing for your health. For re- sources and tips on physical activity and healthy eating visit Healthy U at www. healthyalberta.com. Using tobacco is a big risk factor for having a stroke. The best thing you can do for your health is to quit using tobacco. Best practice for quitting is using a nicotine replacement therapy like the nicotine patch or gum. Com- bining this with tobacco addiction counsel- ling is proven to increase your chance of a successful quit attempt by four times Be sure to check out www.heartandstroke. com for more information and resources on strokes. Health Link Alberta is also great resource for all health-related information. Dial 8-1-1 or visit them at www.myhealth. alberta.ca. Cancer can be beaten - by targeting both cause and cure This month Yellowknife and Fort Smith to- gether raised 290000 in support of the ght against cancer demonstrating once again the amazing generosity of Northern Canadians. Cancer is a much more formidable foe than rst thought. There will never be that one magic bullet cure that will end it as a threat to humanity. There are over 200 va- rieties of cancer with hundreds of molecular proles for each. They are often resilient and adaptive able to mutate and evolve. The Canadian Cancer Society website of- fers the alarming prediction that two in ve Canadians will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetimes. By 2030 the number diag- nosed will reach 277000 up from 197000 this year. There will be an estimated 60 per cent increase in new cancer cases in Alberta within the next 15 years so expect similar in the NWT. Yes things are getting much worse. The good news is weve made tremendous progress saystheCanadianCancerSocietyweb page. In the 1940s only 25 per cent of those di- agnosedwithcancerlivedtotalkaboutit.Today the survival rate is an amazing 60 per cent. That optimism should not overshadow the really bad news however that thousands of Canadians are still dying from cancer each year. That is terrible. We need to do more than look for a cure. We needtoactivelyseekoutthecausesaswelland thendoeverythinginourpowertoeradicatethem. Right now that part of the ght is carried out by a small number of people who are routinely discredited even vilied. That is not surprising since big money is usually at stake but why do so few ght alone The Canadian Cancer Society has been crit- icized because its approach is only reactive. Raising money to nd a cure is defensive and passive. We need to do more than that. TheAmericanCancerSocietywebsitehttp www.cancer.orghasanextensivelistofKnown Human Carcinogens. Here are only the b c and ds along with the rst item of the es Benzene Benzidineanddyesmetabolizedtobenzidine Benzoapyrene Beryllium and beryllium compounds Betel quid with or without tobacco Bischloromethylether and chloromethyl methyl ether technical-grade Busulfan 13-Butadiene Cadmium and cadmium compounds Chlorambucil Chlornaphazine Chromium VI compounds Coal indoor emissions from household combustion Coal gasication Coal-tar distillation Coal-tar pitch Coke production Cyclophosphamide Cyclosporine 12-Dichloropropane Diethylstilbestrol Engine exhaust diesel Many of these are known constituents pouring from the smokestacks of the oil- sands processing factories in northeastern Alberta - thousands of tonnes each day. Many are also dispensed by the coal-red power plant at Lake Wabamun north of Edmonton. Deposited on the land they nd their way into the water. They are on the food we eat in the water we drink. They are fuel for the malignancies waiting to happen in all of us. Diesel exhaust is known to be one of the worstoffendersyetweallowmillionsoftrucks to belch their carcinogens into the air a daily ood of poison that we all breathe. Causes of cancer are like other social ills around us like weeds in an untilled garden that we just cant seem to nd the time to deal with.Racismpovertyhomelessnesscorporate greed domestic violence to name but a few are everywhere as are the causes of cancer. All of them are based in ignorance. When we hear of them we react concerned even hor- ried then glaze over and move on. The discussion of the day is the need to get ridofthecarbon-basedeconomythatiscausing climatechange.Manyoftheworstcarcinogens are contaminates from carbon-based fuel pro- cessing so why is cancer not a compelling part of the argument for getting rid of fossil fuels We cannot afford the luxury of being naive and unaware any longer. Causes of cancer are pervasive in our world and we all know it. As muchasweneedtoseekoutcureswealsoneed toseekoutanderadicatethosecauses.Buthow Itistheresponsibilityofourgovernmentsto protect us. Instead what happens too often is collusion with those responsible. There was a reasonwhytheAlbertadepartmentofEnviron- menthadtheshreddersgoingfordaysandwere haulingawaytruckloadsofdestroyedevidence afterthelong-rulinggovernmentwasdefeated last month. We must be able to trust our own governments. They must be held accountable. Startwithyourownpoliticalrepresentatives now.Makesuretheyhavetheirprioritiesright. Theywillattempttodeectyou.Dontletthem. Demand satisfaction. If enough people act it is amazing how quickly they come around. Electionsarecomingtheperfecttimetoen- surecandidateswillchampionyourcause.Get involved. The scourge of cancer and many of theotherillsfacingallofuscanbeconquered. We all need to join the ght to make it happen. Sonny and Helen MacDonald celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary at the Roaring Rapids Hall in Fort Smith over the weekend surrounded by their family and friends. Kayla Bryce and Mykelty Catholique were some of the many guests who made the occasion so special for their grandparents. PhotoDonJaque Tuesday June 23 2015 5 COLUMNS 15 Years Ago... MP faces illness Western Arctic MP Ethel Blondin-Andrew was diag- nosed last week with a very early and treatable form of breast cancer according to information released by her Ottawa ofce. The Secretary of State for Children and Youth plans to return to Yellowknife to resume her summer working schedule as quickly as possible. Issue June 20 2000 20 Years Ago... NWT policing under review Police services are currently under review across the NWT and its the publics perception of the Norths fu- ture policing needs that count most. The accounting rm of Peat Marwick is heading up the independent review team under the Nunavut Project a plan to design the Norths future after division in 1999. Issue June 21 1995 30 Years Ago... Mass bison drowning More than 70 bison carcasses have been spotted scat- tered over 10 miles of shoreline on the northeast side of Lake Claire in Wood Buffalo National Park. It appears the bison attempted to swim the three or four miles from the small peninsulas on the east side of the lake. Issue June 20 1985 ARCHIVES Northern Journal 2015 Join us online Like Northern Journal on Facebook and get the weekly news delivered to your feed FACEBOOK FEEDBACK The community of Fort Smith showed its true colours last week as thousands of dollars in donations piled in for the Lafferty family following a tragic vehicle acci- dent on Sunday evening. Fort Smith pulls together after tragic car accident Lena Illasiak Fort Smith always pulls together it has always been the best... Relay for Life fundraisers surpass 150000 goal Patricia Sepp I hope they get to use that money in the community By DAWN KOSTELNIK Please please please can I Please let me go I will be careful Ill dress warm and Ill listen. My friend Alice as I will call her for this story is going out for the Easter weekend on the sea ice. Her family is trav- eling with two skidoos and two komatiks to hunt seals on the long weekend I have been invited to come along. Thiswouldbe myrstexperi- ence of hunting and camping on the frozen ocean with no trees. I wonder how we will hunt the seals do they snare seals like we did with rabbits in Good Hope My father nally relents extracting promises from me regarding listening to my el- ders and making sure that I cover my face and wear my snow goggles the wooden carved ones that tie around my head with a caribou hide thong. ThisissoexcitingAlicehas twosistersandthreebrothers her parents of course and an aunt and uncle accompany us on this trip. We divide people between sleds to equalize the load. Komatiks have wooden runners with cross support sections that are lashed to- gether with caribou lacing. The size of them depends on thebuilderswantsandneeds average length is probably eight feet long. Runners are often rein- forced with some type of metal along the bottom. Snow or ice is melted and spit on the metal rails to help them glide fast through the snow and over the ice packs. Lead lines to the skidoo are 10 to 20 feet in length depending on how rough the sea ice is. A long lead line allows the skidoo to get over the ice and pull the weighted komatik up and over behind it. There is no traction being balanced on the top of an ice pack. Going out for even a week- end requires a lot of gear. The snow is too soft to make ig- loos so we will be spending the nights in canvas tents. On the Mackenzie River we used spruce trees as support poles to hold the walls of the tent up and keep it from be- coming a kite. We also used spruce boughs woven to- gether to cover the oor and keep us warm. There are no trees how will this work Speaking of kites we will be using a kite to hide behind to hunt seals. We start off at six in the morning while the snow is still hard. As the sun heats the snow it gets soft and makes it difcult for the ski- doos to pull the weight of the full Komatik. Camp needs to be made by noon. It seems to me that we are heading out into empty white noth- ingness. How do they know where the seals are There are no game trails how do they know where to go To be continued www.thewhitegirl.ca White Girl Easter in the Arctic By LONE SORENSEN Thinningistheprocessofre- moving selected plants if they are too close together. Many of the common plants grown in our Northern gardens like carrots turnips Swiss chard beetsandromainelettucesown fromseedrequirethinningas they need space to grow into big fat juicy plants Carrots During the first thinning of carrots at about an inch in height leave the strongest plant and only one per every half ngers width. The thin- ning process with carrots can be done over several times but its very important to thin properly during the rst thin- ning as this sets them up for successfulgrowingthroughto the fall. With carrots doing a second thinning towards late June or early July to make sure each carrot has enough space is a good thing. By the time they are a small ngers thickness you can start pick- ingeverysecondoneforsome delectablemunching.Goeasy inthebeginningsoitleavesat leasthalfofyourcarrotstogrow to full size by the rst week in September. Beets Beetsneedthinningassoon as they have developed the crownleaves.Thintoangers width.Whenbeetsarethesize of a small egg thin again tak- ing every second one. You can thenhaveafeastofbabybeets and beet greens. Leave half to growtofullpotentialspacedat about10cmbetweeneachplant. Lettuce Romaine lettuce if planted fromseedneedstobethinned to create about 10cm between each plant. If carefully lifted out from under the root the thinned out plant can be Gardening with Lone Thinning your vegetables replanted somewhere else in thegardenwherethereisspace. This only works if done very gently. Swiss chard is thinned andreplantedinthesameway as romaine lettuce. Turnips Turnipsneedthinningwhen crown leaves have developed. Thin to 10 cm between each plant. Hilling potatoes Ideallypotatoeswouldhave beenplantedinafurroworde- pressionandasthestemsgrow toaboutafootinheightputthe soiluparoundthestems.This willallowtheplanttosendout moreumbilicalcordsforset- ting some more potatoes. Boosting Plants Throughout the growing season some plants need an extra boost. Compost tea is a fantastic meal for any plant as it sends the nutrients mi- crobes and minerals quickly down deep to where the roots can absorb them. Liquid kelp and sh fertilizers also work well. Broccoli for instance benefits from a boost after the rst cutting of the biggest crown so it can send out nice strongsideshootsforcontinu- ousproductionthroughtofall. All coles brassicas like cab- bagecauliowerandbroccoli dontmindrawfertilizersuch asliquidshfertilizer.Beware thatcarrotsdonotlikerawfer- tilizerssoifyoundyourcar- rots are not growing and they need a boost make a tea out of well-rotted compost. Tomakecompostteasimply put some compost in a bucket oremptygarbagecan.Fillwith compostandwater.Ifyou donthaveyourownwell-rotted compostyoucanusecompos- tedsheepmanureoranyother compostthatcanbeboughtin bags. Stir well and stir again after an hour. Let this brew for a day or two. Pour some of thisbrewintoyourwatering canandwateryourplants.They will like it Lone Sorensen is the founder of Northern Roots andhaslivedandgrownfood in Yellowknife for 27 years. Charlene Donald Gary Greenland Fort Smith rocks 6 Tuesday June 23 2015 INDUSTRY MINING www.rmwb.ca PUBLIC NOTICE REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF WOOD BUFFALO ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AND ENHANCEMENT ACT NOTICE OF APPLICATION In accordance with the Environmental Protection and Enhancement Act the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo has applied to Environment and Parks to renew the waterworks approval for Fort Chipewyan. They obtain their water from Lake Athabasca and utilize three raw water storage reservoirs. Treatment at the plant consists of pre disinfection oxidation with potassium permanganate coagulation flocculation rapid sand dual media filters. Disinfection is with sodium hypochlorite and UV. They will be required to upgrade the treatment facility as per Dr. Smiths recommendation. The upgrade will include installation of a SCADA system new complete treatment trains added to the existing trains which will include UV disinfection. The operation is located at NW of Section 08 Township 112 Range 7 West of the 4th Meridian. Pursuant to section 73 of the Environmental Protection and Enhancement Act any person who is directly affected by this operation may submit a written statement of concern regarding this application. Failure to file a statement of concern may affect the right to file a Notice of Appeal with the Environmental Appeals Board. Such a statement of concern must be submitted to Environment and Sustainable Resource Development Regulatory Approvals Center Main Floor 9820 - 106 Street Edmonton Alberta TSK 2J6 Fax 780-422-0154 Email esrd.epeaapplicationsgov.ab.ca within 30 days of the date of this notice. Please quote Application No. 009-680 when submitting a statement of concern in regards to the Environmental Protection and Enhancement Act application. NOTE Any statement filed regarding this application are public records which are accessible by the public. Copies of the application and additional information can be obtained from Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo Attention Shanta Chakrovortty 9909 Franklin Avenue Fort McMurray AB T9H 2K4 Telephone 780-793-1081 Mining group blames regulator for pulled NWT drilling application Husky withdraws application to drill for fracking sand in NWT By MEAGAN WOHLBERG Mining advocates in the Northwest Ter- ritories say the environmental assessment process is to blame for Husky Oils decision to withdraw its application to drill for the sand used in hydraulic fracturing along the North Arm of Great Slave Lake. Husky backed out of the review process just days before Aboriginal groups were scheduled to make their concerns with the project known at public hearings on June 18 in Behchoko and June 23-24 in Yellowknife. In a brief letter to the Mackenzie Valley Environmental Impact Review Board last Tuesday the company said it would be with- drawing its application to drill for silica near Whitebeach Point 50 km west of Yellowknife but gave no reasons why. Tom Hoefer executive director of the NWT Nunavut Chamber of Mines said the review process is likely at the root of their decision. Wehavebeenwarninggovernmentsagainst referring small projects to environmental as- sessmentforsometimeevenbeforetheHusky sand project Hoefer said. It is unusual and unnecessary from an environmental perspec- tiveforjurisdictionstotakethesesmallprojects to such a detailed review for approval. What it does is to force small projects into more costly and complex regulatory processes costly for not just the proponent but also for regulators government and communities. HuskysproposalknownastheChedabucto Mineral Exploration Project sought a ve- year land use permit to drill approximately 200 holes for silica a ne quartz-rich sand used as a proppant in the hydraulic fractur- ing process. The application was made last December and referred to environmental assessment by the review board in February after Aborigi- nal groups made it clear the project would be the cause of public concern. At the time Husky representatives indi- cated their next moves were uncertain and would be dependent on the process. Last weeks decision comes just weeks after the company also conrmed it would not be pursuing further shale oil exploration in the Sahtu region this winter. Hoefer said the lack of certainty for ex- ploration companies is hurting the economy overall since the odds of nding a resource extraction project are one in a thousand. Iliketosaymineralexplorationislikebingo. Theoddsareagainstyoutowinhesaid.Thatis whysmartbingoplayersplaymanymanycards at once to increase the odds of winning. That is also why we need to have many many explora- tionprojectsunderwayifwearetoincreasethe oddsofoneofthembecomingamine.Butchas- ingawayinvestmentbeforeitevenhasachance to nd anything like the simple Husky sand project will hurt us in the long run. First Nations opposed project Both the Tlicho Government and Yellow- knives Dene whose traditional territory in- cludes the area of Whitebeach Point had submitted letters of concern to the review board rejecting Huskys proposal. IntheTlichosplannedhearingpresentation the government said it had not been consulted priortoHuskybeingissuedthemineralclaims fortheWhitebeachPointareainDecember2011 and had asked for the area to be designated a protected area in its land use plan based on its ecological and cultural importance. The Tlicho Government recommends the rejection of this mineral exploration activity given that there is not broad based accep- tance of exploration or mining in the area the presentation concluded. SimilarlytheYellowknivesDenesaidthearea is ecologically sensitive and has both present andhistoricalsignicanceasaharvestingarea. This Whitebeach Point and area is of sig- nicance to the Yellowknives Dene and they have ancestors buried in the area and the traditional use of hunting trapping and sh- ing rights will not be given up for that area states comments from the Yellowknives Dene written to the board in May. The NWT chapter of the Council of Cana- dians called Huskys decision a victory for the area that has historical cultural envi- ronmental and recreational value. This is no place for a mine particularly a mine that aside from being damaging in its ownrightwould support the environmentally destructive practice of horizontal hydraulic fracturing said co-chair Peter Redvers. Its time that industry and public governments recognize that the continued exploitation and use of non-renewable energy sources is not socially environmentally or economically sustainable. Redvers said the chapter supports the Tli- cho Governments proposal of creating a pro- tected area in the North Arm. son g YELLOWKNIFE GREAT SLAVE LAKE WHITEBEACH POINT Tuesday June 23 2015 7 INDUSTRY REMOTE SENSING Europe trip lands new deals for Inuvik satellite facility Space agencies eyeing NWT as most secure global remote sensing site By MEAGAN WOHLBERG A recent trip to Europe to rallyinvestmentintheNorth- west Territories burgeoning satellite facility was made worthwhile by several major new commitments to infra- structure and nancing ac- cordingtoNWTFinanceMin- ister Michael Miltenberger. Miltenberger Premier Bob McLeod and numerous other delegates from the territory visited Norway Sweden Italy and Germany from June 7 to 12 to obtain commitments from various governments and space agencies toward Inuviks fledgling satellite remote sensing station. Part of the lobbying effort was to advertise that over one-third of the 1200-km Mackenzie Valley Fibre Link MVFL which will connect Inuviks satellite facility to a high-speed information network has been installed. European agencies had said building such a bre-optic connector was a condition for their interest in the region. Thistripwasinsomecases tocementtherelationshipthat wasstartedacoupleyearsago when we were over there say- ingweweregoingtobuildthe line.Theywereinterestedand watching carefully Milten- berger said. Now its under construction and were going tohitthedeadlineoflightingit upthesecondquarterof2016 andothercountrieshavemade theirdecisionthattheyrecom- ing on board. The tour resulted in in- creased investments from Sweden which already has infrastructure in Inuvik in the form of another sat- ellite dish commitments from Germany and the Eu- ropean Space Agency of an enhanced presence in Inu- vik and strong interest from Italy in becoming involved. It also brought Norway on board for the rst time with a newdealthatevenonitsown madetheentiretripworththe cost Miltenberger said. They were looking at Prudhoe Bay but when we met with them they told us they had made their de- cision and Inuviks their decision. Theyre going to be putting satellites on the ground there he said. That alone makes the trip worthwhile. Norway will be install- ing four smaller dishes and a large 13-metre dish. The larger dish costs around 5-7 millionwhilethesmallersat- ellite dishes cost around 2-3 million. The Inuvik facility opened in 2010 and currently has three 14-metre antennas in operation. Site work for a fourth dish is underway and a fth dish is planned for springsummer 2016. Though Miltenberger has known for some time the potential Inuvik holds to become a leading global remote sensing hotspot he said the excursion was an eye opener in terms of the proximity to the remote sens- ingfacilityinKirunaSweden. What I hadnt really real- ized before is that Svalbard is too close to Russia which is where the Norwegians are and so is Kiruna he said. That security factor has really played in Inuviks favour. MuchoftheEuropeaninterest isinbeenguptheInuvikfacil- itys capabilities so that it isnt just a downloading centre but willhavethecapacityforimme- diateinformationprocessingon the ground. Miltenberger said developingthecapacitywillbea steeplearningcurvefortheter- ritory but will be facilitated in part by the Europeans. Werenotmatureyetwere justgettingtheinfrastructure in place Miltenberger said. WerenowintheITbusiness the knowledge business and wehavetostayveryconnected with these folks. Weve got to catchup.Wereanoilandgas resource development area and when you look at the complexityandtheamountof money - literally hundreds of billions that are spent in the remote sensing business - we have a huge opportunity but were like in kindergarten and weve got to progress fast because theyre lining up and coming into town. Miltenbergersaidcountries asfarasJapanareliningupto setupinfrastructureinInuvik now that the MFVL is on its way to being nished. When compared to Kiruna where the industry has generated 400 jobs and 150 million a year it has huge implications for the town of 5000. Big countries strong powerful countries with huge spaceprogramstheyallwant to come to Inuvik he said. This is all good news. Its a growthpotentialitsaknowl- edge-based industry thats not tied to the resource sec- tor. All these things are there for us to take advantage of. geopolitical value of the small NWT town. HesaidtheEuropeanSpace Agency expressed concern about the shared jurisdiction of Norways Svalbard with Russia which is also in close The site that is the safest thats going to evolve into the major site is going to be Inuvik because its in Can- ada its well away from any risk of conict where data or sites could be compromised. Big countries strong powerful countries with huge space programs they all want to come to Inuvik. NWT Finance Minister Michael Miltenberger PhotoscourtesyofGNWT GNWT delegates sign an agreement with members of the German Aerospace Centre. NWT Premier Bob McLeod right meets with Alexander Kaptein of Airbus Defence and Space. 8 Tuesday June 23 2015 POLITICS HUMAN RIGHTS Find details on evacuation routes procedures check lists directions and preparedness on the first page of the Town of Fort Smith website under Emergency Info. www.fortsmith.ca THANK YOU MAHSI CHO Thank you to the organizers sponsors and participants of Aboriginal Day in Fort Smith. The events and activities presented highlight the essential contributions of Aboriginal traditions and culture to our community. TOWN OF FORT SMITH Town of Fort Smith spring cleanup program will be finished at the end of June. It is FREE so please take advantage Take your refuse to the curb call Town Hall 872-8400 and municipal crews will come to take it away for you. If you want to haul loads of refuse or gar- bage to the dump all tipping fees have been waived. In addition to cleaning up our community this special program is offered to encourage fire abatement. For advice on how to Fire Smart your yard so your home is safer call Daniel Allaire Manager of Forests for the South Slave Region at 872-6425. THE END IS NEAR Fire season is upon us and we all have to do our part. This is your chance to Fire Smart your yard. Remove any flammable debris Take away any brush and small trees if you are close to the forest edge If you want to burn Be aware of fire hazard levels. Contact Town Hall to see if burn- ing is allowed. Be careful with cig- arette butts. Help make our com- munity safer HAPPY ABORIGINAL DAY By DALI CARMICHAEL Following a review of its rst 10 years in operation the NWT Human Rights Commis- sion HRC is preparing to undergo a system overhaul moving from a strictly formal ju- dicially-based method to one more restor- ative in nature. BymovingtothenewsystemtheHRCaims to reduce the numberof individual complaints reachingtheadjudicationstagebyleavingmore resources available for communities outside of the North Slave region and being more pro- active in identifying and addressing cases of systemic discrimination - some of the major recommendations stemming from the report. If a complaint is referred to the adjudi- cation panel its exactly like going to court said HRC chair Charles Dent in an interview with the Journal. You have the two sides in front of a judge or jury presenting their legal arguments and precedent. Its not just come and tell your story and the truth be out the current system is very legal and youre talk- ing about a very expensive process. The new process theyve recommended is moving away from that legalistic adversarial process to a The current adversarial or legalistic process does not always fairly resolve human rights issues. Charles Dent NWT Human Rights Commission Review of NWT Human Rights Commission calls for shift to restorative system restorative process meaning the information gathering would take place more face to face. The updated system would use more of an inquisitorial information gathering style Dent said likening it to the process used by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. It becomes a totally different process if the adjudicator is the only one asking ques- tions he said. Its more of an exploration of the issue than it is one where you have to prove that somebody has broken a law. Thereportalsocallsforimprovementstothe HRCs structural organization which is cur- rently divided into three independent bodies - the directors ofce the commission and the adjudication panel - which have no duty to report to one another. This can create a bun- gled and drawn-out process for dealing with complaints that leave those involved angry confused and disheartened not to mention broke if they have hired a lawyer. What happens now is people come into the directors ofce they develop a relationship withthepeopleinthedirectorsofceandthen when their complaint gets referred to the adju- dication panel its a totally different ofce and totally different people and they start all over again Dent said. With the recommendation we would actually have a seamless process. Theadjudicationpanelwouldstayindependent but administrative changes would allow infor- mationtoowmorefreelybetweenthebodies. The review conducted by out-of-province consultantsJenniferJ.LlewellynJ.GrantSin- clairandGeraldJ.HasheyexaminedtheHRCs performance over the last 10 years looking at elements including comprehensiveness of in- vestigations fair consideration of complaints accessibilitytothecommissionandaddressing individual and systemic discrimination. The HRC is ready and willing to imple- ment the recommendations from the review Dent said. The current adversarial or legalistic pro- cess does not always fairly resolve human rights issues Dent said. This is an agency thats created to resolve those issues and were saying it doesnt do that as often as it should. We recognized there is a signicant problem and we had considered restorative as perhaps a way to resolve that but we thought we would park that idea and just focus on improving the current process as much as we could. To act on this change of heart the HRC will need some help from the legislative assem- bly to both increase its funding and to make amendments to the NWT Human Rights Act. The recommended changes to the legis- lation will take time Dent said. With an election coming up this fall nothing is going to get done until probably a year from now. When that time nally comes Dent and his team will be ready. They are currently prepar- ing an implementation plan for the restor- ative system set to be completed by this fall and executed over the next two to three years. Tuesday June 23 2015 9 HEALTH WELLNESS FACILITIES www.rmwb.ca IMPORTANT DEADLINE 2015 PROPERTY TAX PAYMENT DUE MONDAY JUNE 30 2015 Tax Notices were mailed to all property owners on Friday May 29 2015. Payments are due Tuesday June 30 2015. A Tax Installment Payment Plan TIPP is available for your convenience. You may find this an easy and cost-effective way of paying your annual tax bill. If you have not received your Property Tax Notice please contact the Taxation branch. Information regarding your Property Tax Notice and the TIPP program are available on our website at www.rmwb.cataxes or by calling 780-743-7900 or toll free at 1-800-973-9663. Payments are due June 30 2015 Regardless of circumstances CELEBRATE NATIONAL ABORIGINAL DAY JUNE 21 2015 Constituency Office 5014-50th Avenue P.O. Box 1986 Yellowknife NT X1A 2P5 Tel 867 873-6995 Toll Free 1-800-661-0802 Fax 867 920-4233 Ottawa Office Confederation Building 229 Wellington Street Room 239 Ottawa ON K1A 0A6 Toll Free 1-866-992-4587 Fax 613 992-1586 Dennis Bevington Member of Parliament for the Northwest Territories Let us celebrate this day together and acknowledge all the members of the First Nations communities who make Canada whole. New health centre opens in Fort Providence By DALI CARMICHAEL The community of Fort Providence cel- ebrated the opening of a new Health and Social Services centre last week where residents hope modern health practices and traditional healing methods will be used hand in hand. Local leaders residents and health offi- cials gathered at the new facility on June 15 to cut the ribbon on the new 9.7-mil- lion facility. For the first time in the community both health and social services will be housed in the same facility. Included in the new health centre is an upper-floor residence for visiting doctors and nurses. The centre itself is expected to employ around 20 staff members. At the request of the local Deh Gah Gotie Dene First Nation the centre also hosts a morgue in the basement a service that was unavailable in the community until now. The facility replaces Fort Providences former health centre which is over 40 years old. The new building is about 1085 square metres about a third bigger than the previous building. It did its job but it was getting too old and expensive to operate Deh Gah Gotie Chief Joachim Bonnetrouge said of the previous facility. Patient care is in high demand theres so much happening in our community Bonnetrouge said noting the high traffic in the area from travelers morel mush- room pickers and the communitys aging population. New vision for an updated facility To compliment the new services and staff at the facility Bonnetrouge is asking all staff from outside the region receive cultural sen- sitivity training. As part of the opening I had to make a remark and I said it would be wonderful - we all welcome people coming to work for us and work in the community - but I think they should have more cultural sensitivity programs or workshops Bonnetrouge said. Its gotta be mandatory because a lot of these people come from Ontario Saskatchewan and Providence is basically a First Nations community there are certain things that we do here and those workers need to know. Bonnetrouge said he would be happy to provide the training from the community but Health and Social Services Minister Glen Abernethy has stated a territorial cultural sensitivity training system is in development. Were quite willing to provide that and basically the elders are the ones that teach those things - culture stuff protocols cer- tain things that we need to do Bonnetrouge said. Especially in care giving there are a lot of sensitive areas that people need to learn about so thats what were suggesting. Patient care is in high demand theres so much happening in our community. Chief Joachim Bonnetrouge Deh Gah Gotie Dene PhotocourtesyofGlenAbernethyTwitter Regional and territorial leaders gather as Fort Providence elder Margaret Sabourin centre cuts the ribbon on the communitys new health care facility. 10 Tuesday June 23 2015 Seeking Public Comment on NWT Species at Risk Proposals 128-367 NNSL NJ The Government of the Northwest Territories is looking for your input on the following proposed actions under the NWT Species at Risk program Proposed addition to the NWT List of Species at Risk Western Toad as Threatened Comments due by July 20 2015 Proposed Draft Recovery Strategies NWT Boreal Caribou Recovery Strategy Comments due by July 20 2015 NWT Hairy Braya Recovery Strategy Comments due by August 10 2015 For more information on these proposals or copies of the recovery strategies visit the NWT Species at Risk website at www.nwtspeciesatrisk.ca or contact your local Environment and Natural Resources Office. Send your comments to Lynda Yonge Director Wildlife Environment and Natural Resources Government of the Northwest Territories Box 1320 Yellowknife NT X1A 2L9 Phone 867 873-7588 Fax 867 873-0293 Email saragov.nt.ca Congratulations Well done Hannah on winning the Northern Journal award for Academic Achievement in Grade 7 at PWK High School in Fort Smith 207 McDougal Rd Fort Smith NT 877-355-2734www.norj.ca Hannah Porter Traditions take centre stage at Fort Smith Aboriginal Day celebrations Events host Mike Beaver gives his best moose call. Henry Beaver Sr. takes aim during the Aboriginal Day bow and arrow contest in Fort Smith. Don Desjarlais and Victor Marie hold the log as Cynthia White shows off her sawing skills. Anna Coleman is Fort Smiths top jigger. Darryl Bourke races through an obstacle course carrying heavy loads of water. Tuesday June 23 2015 11 Elder of the Year Award Citizen of the Year Award Paul Currie Volunteer of the Year Award Fort Smith is fortunate to have many people who contribute to the betterment of life in Fort Smith. Please take the time to nominate these wonderful citizens. Nomination deadline June 26 2015 at 1200 noon Nomination forms available from Town Hall or on our website at www.fortsmith.ca Forms can be submitted to townoffortsmithfortsmith.ca The Town of Fort Smith is accepting nominations for ase leave a message at 872-5543 for details. ESCLEAN NORTHERN SALES LTD. Ph 867 875-5100 Fax 867 875-5155 on - long - medium der - female on is a very loving and utiful cat. She is spayed s up-to-date with all hots.If you think you a home for a Avalon se call the shelter at 5543. Please leave a message at 872-5543 for details. WESCLEAN NORTHERN SALES LTD. Ph 867 875-5100 Fax 867 875-5155 E-mail infowescleannwt.com web www.wescleannwt.com Avalon Cat Hair - long Size - medium Gender - female Avalon is a very loving and beautiful cat. She is spayed and is up-to-date with all her shots.If you think you have a home for a Avalon please call the shelter at 872-5543. s leave a message at 872-5543 for details. CLEAN NORTHERN SALES LTD. Ph 867 875-5100 Fax 867 875-5155 g dium female a very loving and cat. She is spayed -to-date with all .If you think you ome for a Avalon ll the shelter at . Please leave a message at 872-5543 for details. WESCLEAN NORTHERN SALES LTD. Ph 867 875-5100 Fax 867 875-5155 E-mail infowescleannwt.com web www.wescleannwt.com Avalon Cat Hair - long Size - medium Gender - female Avalon is a very loving and beautiful cat. She is spayed and is up-to-date with all her shots.If you think you have a home for a Avalon please call the shelter at 872-5543. Please leave a message at 872-5543 for details. WESCLEAN NORTHERN SALES LTD. Ph 867 875-5100 Fax 867 875-5155 E-mail infowescleannwt.com web www.wescleannwt.com Avalon Cat Hair - long Size - medium Gender - female Avalon is a very loving and beautiful cat. She is spayed and is up-to-date with all her shots.If you think you have a home for a Avalon please call the shelter at 872-5543. onng hair home ered h routine shots d y girl who is he loves being st about any will make a any family. Please leave a message at 872-5543 for details. WESCLEAN NORTHERN SALES LTD. Ph 867 875-5100 Fax 867 875-5155 E-mail infowescleannwt.com web www.wescleannwt.com Avalon Cat Hair - long Size - medium Gender - female Avalon is a very loving and beautiful cat. She is spayed and is up-to-date with all her shots.If you think you have a home for a Avalon please call the shelter at 872-5543. Minnie was a very scared shy cat when she first came in. She had been kept in a bedroom and was not socialized. She has come a long way but will re- quire some patience to gain her trust. She is a great cat just not good with other animals. SpayedNeutered Up-to-date with routine shots House trained Please leave a message at 872-5543 for details. Minnie was a very scared shy cat when she first Minnie Grey and white Looking for a new home Brandon Waquin wins rst place in the under 15 jigging competiton. A tuckered out Daniel Jackson Jr. of Fort Good Hope sleeps on his dad Daniel Jackson. PhotosDaliCarmichaelandPaulBannister Cynthia Foote throws an axe during the adult traditional games. Bev Chepelsky and her daughter Yevah lead a line of drum dancers. Maggie Sikeyas bannock making station stays busy as crowds clamour for a tastes of her famous recipe. 12 Tuesday June 23 2015 Fort Smith youth get sens By MEAGAN WOHLBERG When Pauline Gordon was a young girl in school in the Beaufort Delta very little that was familiar to her about her region and cul- ture was taught in the classroom. We didnt see ourselves in the curricu- lum she said. There was always Sir Alex- ander Mackenzie with his two native guides. It didnt indicate who the two native guides were but in some instances they were the rea- son the explorers lived. So I didnt see myself reflected in any of those things. Thats why for the last seven years the for- mer teacher has been working to help close the divide between culture and classroom in Fort Smith with her partner Mike Beaver by host- ingweek-longculturalcampseveryJuneforthe youth of Joseph B. Tyrrell elementary school. Youth from kindergarten to Grade 6 spent their days over at the Northern Life Museum and Cultural Centre last week rotating from station to station to learn about the regions land and traditions. The stations included archery bannock making duck plucking wood cutting beaver skinning traditional plants and medicines storytelling and a tour of the museum. Each year Gordon said the cultural activi- ties depend on what and who is available. Typ- ically they have more fish and are able to cut andhangfilletstodrybutthisyeartheyhadan abundance of beaver and so were able to learn about the animal and its habitat how to skin it and scrape its pelt and how to cook the meat. I thought over the course of my career that it was important to try and get that cul- tural slant that was missing Gordon said. I think its very important for our kids in order for them to feel a sense of self and see them- selves in the body of the education system that they learn about who their grandfathers and grandmothers were and how they lived. Ashlynn Daniels tries her hand at archery also learning the Cree words for rabbit wpos and duck ssp. Don Desjarlais shows a curious and enthusiastic group of stu Culture camp coordinator Paulin her puppy Cujo outside the teep hosting storytelling and drum ci Kai Bennett leads a drum circle for his peers in the teepee during storytelling time meant to pass on the oral tradition to the students. Pre-schooler Ralston Rutherford-Simon front and Jacob Steed get a lesson in plants and traditional medicines from Raymond Beaver taking a moment to smell some wild mint. EDUCATION CULTURE CAMP Tuesday June 23 2015 13 se of self at culture camp Mike and his brothers hold a bounty of tra- ditional knowledge from the area allowing them to lead most of the core activities and because Gordon has extensive experience as an educator including with curriculum devel- opment she helped create the structure of the camp so it would be interesting participatory and age appropriate for the kids. The students are broken up into groups that include a range of ages in order to create a supportive and inspirational learning expe- rience for some of the littler ones who get to look up to and be assisted by their older peers. Gordon herself facilitates the storytelling activity where she passes around props like muskrat fur and drums to get the youth to share their own thoughts feelings and tales. We all have stories right I tell them the importance of that its not just an older person who has a story. We all have stories they all have stories and its important that we share that she said. To allow them to share in our oral tradition by practicing it I think is the best method of teaching. Apart from the culture camps Beaver and Gordon also provide cultural orientation train- ing for teachers and principals and organize much of the annual Aboriginal Day celebra- tions in Fort Smith on June 21. Gordon said the excitement of the camps even lters into the greater community. When we started this there was hardly any- one coming for lunch. Then we started telling people were cooking beaver and duck and sh over there and their eyes get big because its so hard to get our types of food if youre not from some of the bigger families that have harvests. So we usually have people that come in and out during the day or they come during lunch to eat some of our traditional food Gordon said. Wejustshare.Thatspartofourbelief isthatif yousharethenMotherNatureprovidesforyou. How to cook a beaver tail By MEAGAN WOHLBERG The tail of a beaver is so rich and buttery when it is cooked its almost easy to forget that its meat. But the delicacy has been an important source of protein as well as fat for indigenous people in the North for centuries. Henry Beaver of Fort Smith spent last week teaching youth about the parts of the beaver and their various uses during a culture camp for elementary school students. Apart from the luxurious warm pelt that beaversprovide forhatsandmittsinthe North he said beavers are a popular traditional food source and the tail is the most coveted piece of the animal. The Journal asked him whats the best way to go about cooking a beaver tail. He gave us a basic run-down of preparing the dish. 1. After cutting the tail off take a stick - pref- erably a green willow - and insert it where the tail was once attached to the body. 2. Hold the tail at over an open re rotating it until the outer black skin bubbles and dries and can be peeled off easily. The tail will curve from the heat as it cooks. 3. Peel the charred skin off like you would a baked potato revealing the white greasy esh underneath. 4.Boil the tail over the re in a pot of water for an hour or more or until the esh is tender and easy to cut. 5. Enjoy with salt and pepper or a little ketchup or mustard. The tail should cut easily and be easy to chew. Beaver said the tail can also be roasted on a stick over a re. In that case instead of re- moving the outer skin keep the dark skin on while the esh underneath cooks. Check by removing a bit of the skin to tell when the meat is cooked through. All other parts of the beaver can also be eaten. Some like to throw the liver right on a re and cook it that way. The animal is typi- cally cut into pieces and boiled over the re or stove. If it is small enough it can be roasted right in the oven even stuffed like a turkey. Cooked slowly and with enough moisture beaver meat should be tender and easy to pull apart with a fork. Beaver meat is dark meat resembling rabbit and has a mild taste that can be easily enhanced with a bit of salt. Beaver meat is an excellent source of iron protein and vitamin B and the livers are high sources of vitamin A as well. Not only is beaver delicious and afford- able but it keeps people connected to the land while trapping which is also a good way to keep t. So next time you have the chance to have a taste of Canadas national animal make sure to give it a try udents from JBT School how to singe a plucked duck over the re. Student Ethan Laing learns the art of wood cutting from Fred Beaulieu. The trick Pull dont push Henry Beaver shows Olivia Cox Josh Chabun and Aiden Alexis how to prepare a beaver tail for roasting over the re using a stick. Elder Maggie Sikyea was busy all week teaching little ones how to make bannock which the students roasted by stick over the re and smothered with syrup and butter. ne Gordon takes a break with pee where she spent the week ircles with the youth. PhotosMeaganWohlberg 14 Tuesday June 23 2015 ARTS CULTURE FILM By DALI CARMICHAEL For the last ve years NWT lmmaker Kirsten Carthew has been working to get her Northern passion project off the ground a goal that is now in reach thanks to funding from Telelm Canada. Early last week Carthew and co-producer Amos Scott who form the Jill Jacksh Pro- ductions company received word from the Canadian national lm funding body that they were nalists for the organizations mi- cro-budget production program. Its been a project that I keep returning to Carthew said. A few years ago in 2012 we thought we would be able to make it but the funding structure and the lm funding infrastructure in the NWT wasnt really in place to support it. Even then the Telelm micro-budget production program also didnt exist. Several years later all that has changed. The funds from the Telelm program which are dedicated to up-and-coming lmmak- ers creating their rst feature-length lm are set to cover 120000 - about half of the lms budget. The lm was nominated as a candidate for the program by Western Arc- tic Moving Pictures. Another large portion of the projects - nancing will be covered by the department of Industry Tourism and Investments pilot rebate program which was created earlier this year to encourage on-location lming in the NWT. The team is now just 30000 shy of their nancing goal an amount they hope to source from a Northern donor. NWT lmmakers get funding to shoot rst feature The Sun at Midnight casting for mostly indigenous actors from the North By the North in the North for the North The lm called The Sun at Midnight tells the story of Leah a troubled teenage girl liv- ing in Montreal who is sent to live with her es- tranged grandmother in Fort McPherson. Un- accustomedtoNorthernlifeLeahisdesperate to escape and sets off on her own by boat in an attempt to get back to the city facing the dan- gersoftheNorthonherownuntilsherunsinto an elder named Alfred on the land. Its a story thats inspired by my own life experiences and growing up in the NWT Carthew said. Its the relationship between a young woman whos trying to discover who she is who starts to relate to herself in new ways because of her relationship with this elder and the land and nature. For me thats always been a big part of my life relating to the external world through nature and being able to analyze and improve myself in bet- ter ways. Knowing she wanted to write a story that wasasauthenticaspossibleCarthewwasdili- gent in working with the Gwichin Social and Cultural Institute as she ne-tuned the script. Ireallyfellinlovewiththelandscapeinthe BeaufortDeltaandthatswhereIwantedtoset the story and it made sense to me to reach out totheGwichinbecausethatsintheirterritory Carthewsaid.Theyreaditandtheyhadsome elders read it and they really liked the story - they had good notes. Its been a very positive relationship. It is really a Northern story and I think thatsonereasonIwasattractedtotheproject Scott said. What makes our industry grow is to have a homegrown Northern story being written and directed and made in the North. With the project nally a reality Scott and Carthew are ready to get down to work. We have a pretty ambitious timeline here Scott said. Were trying to lm it in August through September and we still need to cast the movie so theres a handful of things hap- pening at once. Inprotectingtheauthenticityofthestorythe duoarelookingtohireamostlyindigenouscast. This is not a Hollywood blockbuster lm. Itsfairlynicheandwereallythinkthattheau- dience for this lm will be drawn to it because of its authenticity and because of the theme of survival and the setting and the landscape of the North Carthew said. I think its really important for the story and for the audience that it feel authentic. It wouldnt be appropri- ate to have non-indigenous cast in the roles. However they are encouraging people from all ethnicities to try out for the lm as an exercise in building a catalogue of actors and production people in the North. You never know what you might uncover duringtheauditioningprocessCarthewsaid. For more information on the lm and the casting process head to httpwww.jilland- jacksh.com PhotocourtesyofJillandJackshProductions The Sun at Midnight tells the story of Leah a troubled girl from Montreal who is sent to live with her grandmother in Fort McPherson. Filming for the production is set to run from August through September. Tuesday June 23 2015 15 ARTS CULTURE MUSIC By MEAGAN WOHLBERG The NWT Cree Language Programs new musical compilation album celebrated an of- ficial launch on Aboriginal Day in Fort Smith claiming its status as the first indigenous lan- guage album of its kind. The album called Nehihaw Nikamonak Oyoyowak Ohci Nanaskomowin or Cree Songs Howling for Gratitude features 14 tracks. Half are by local Northern artists like State of the Art and The Johnnys while the other half are by well-known Cree language artists from down south including A Tribe Called Red Jason Burnstick K.A.S.P. and the Iskwew Singers to name a few. CreeLanguageProgrammanagerKyleNapier said the album is first and foremost a collec- tion of fantastic original songs that he hopes will serve as a language learning resource. Ifindthatitseasiertofeelemotionallycon- nected to an album more so than you would to a dictionary or a plant identification book so we hope that the album elicits an emo- tional response that will encourage people to keep listening to the album and then parse out words gradually learn those words and then the sentences and phrases that theyre in he said. Thats maybe something that music offers that books or websites wont is that its something you can sing along to. Unlike most music the songs on Oyoyowak Ohci Nanaskomowin are meant to be shared for free Napier said. While the CD is labeled all rights reserved it also tells listeners that reproduction as a learning resource is encouraged. Cree album aims to inspire indigenous language learners Thats something you dont typically see on CDs. The album isnt available for sale its available for free Napier said. Thats because Napier wants the album to not only facilitate the spread of the Cree language but to inspire other indig- enous people to write songs in their own languages. We are encouraging those from other lan- guage groups whether its another dialect of Cree or another language group entirely to create resources like this he said. We recognize that a compilation album in an indigenous language hasnt been done like this before so we really want to see projects from other languages. There are approximately 330 speakers of Bush Cree in the NWT and another 1500 to 2000 in northern Alberta. With another 11 dialects of Cree across Canada roughly 83475 people identified as Cree speakers as of 2011 according to Statistics Canada. Napier said the album is mutually intelli- gible for speakers of both the Bush Cree and Plains Cree dialects. Every word spoken on the album is in Cree though the accompany- ing booklet translates the lyrics into English. While many of the songs were commis- sioned from known artists five of the songs were written during songwriting workshops held over the winter in Fort Smith and Hay River and are intended to have simplistic phrasing for easy comprehension. There arent any complicated series of words or lyrics in the songs theyre in a fairly basic sentence structure Napier said. So wed encourage people who do listen to the album or engage with it will use the liner notes or translated lyric book...You can use it to not only translate the word but use the songs as pronunciation guides. Since becoming Cree Language manager last fall Napier said he has been working to increase his capacity in the language which has influenced the kinds of resources he feels would be beneficial to others learning the language such as the album. As an early learner it does benefit my ap- proach to language resource development he said. Anything that would be commu- nity-minded and wouldnt involve just my participation it has to involve the work of elders of youth of artists and collaborators and designers. Mmawpiyak - community - is a big big focus. Thats whos really creat- ing the resources. The album is now available to download for free from nehiyawewin.com. FEATURING ARTISTS SUCH AS ELDER MARY CARDINAL A TRIBE CALLED RED VERONICA JOHNNY JASON BURNSTICK THE JOHNNYS ART NAPOLEON STATE OF THE ART K.A.S.P. ASICI ELDER WINSTON WUTTUNEE GERALD AND GERRY POITRAS ISKWEW SINGERS DOMINIC ABRAHAM NORTHERN CREE JORDANN POITRAS MINA KELCEY PIERROT The NWT Cree Language Program gratefully acknowledges the financial contribution from the Department of Education Culture and Employment of the Government of the Northwest Territories. NEHIYAW NIKAMONAK OYOYOWAK OHCI NANASKOMOWIN CREE SONGSHOWLS FOR GRATITUDE Education Culture Economic Development AVAILABLE FOR FREE DOWNLOAD AT NEHIYAWEWIN.COM ON JUNE 21ST 2015 NATIONAL ABORIGINAL DAY MEKIWIN NIKAMONAK FREE ALBUM Cree Language Program manager Kyle Napier hands out free copies of the new Cree language album at Aboriginal Day celebrations in Fort Smith on Sunday June 21. PhotoDaliCarmichael 16 Tuesday June 23 2015 INDUSTRY AVIATION By MEAGAN WOHLBERG The versatile workhorse of the aviation worldthathelpedshapetheCanadianNorthis celebrating the 50th anniversary of its maiden ightwithatripbackacrosstheYukonNorth- west Territories and Nunavut. The de Havilland Canada Twin Otter air- plane now produced by Viking Air got its start in 1965 and quickly became a staple for transportation and shipping in the North due to its ability to access isolated places on oats or wheels in any season. This summer the Series 400 Twin Otter will be traveling across the three territories to celebrate the legacy of the plane the commu- nities it helped build and the personal stories of Northerners who depended on its service. ParticularlyintheCanadianNorththeTwin Otterreallywasquiteinstrumentalinassisting thedevelopmentoftheNorthandopeningitup saidJeannieFullerprojectmanagerforViking Air.Itwasthataircraftthatmadesuchadiffer- encetonotonlycommunitiesstayingconnected tootherpartsoftheNorthbutalsofromamili- tary standpoint or medevac standpoint or as- sisting in building the mines...When we look at whereitsbeenmostusedinCanadatheNorth is really where its had the most impact. The tour will kick off on Canada Day in Vic- toria B.C. ying the next day to the North and stopping at 13 different communities across the three territories. The tour will start in Nunavut before com- ing over to Yellowknife on July 8 in time for Twin Otter to mark 50th anniversary with Northern tour the annual Midnight Sun Float Plane Fly- In. It will then head to Inuvik Tuktoyaktuk Sachs Harbour Fort Good Hope and Norman Wells also stopping in Whitehorse Yukon. Because of its timing with Canada Day the tour will not only mark the 50th anniver- sary of the Twin Otter but the half century of the Canadian ag - two Canadian icons Fuller said. At each of the stops participants will be encouraged to visit the aircraft share their Twin Otter stories and sign a wing rib that will be added to the 100th Viking produc- tion aircraft scheduled to be built in 2016. Those signatures will be forever a part of that aircraft which is really a nice legacy piece Fuller said. Its got a really nice feel to it...It really provides a way to give people in the communities that were going to an opportunity to participate in the celebration and have it be meaningful to them. Aframedwallhangingwillalsobepresented to the mayor and council in each community to be displayed in the municipal ofce. According to Fuller people from the North have already expressed excitement about the tourandaresharingtheirstorieswhetherthey be former pilots or RCMP ofcers or midwives with personal connections to the aircraft. Fuller said the Twin Otter is unique in that it holds both historical and contemporary signicance for the North. Its a pretty special and incredible to think that there are so many Twin Otters built origi- nally that are still ying she noted. It con- tinues to serve communities in a big way. Tour Dates Locations and Celebration Times Walk-in patients are welcome T 867-872-2887 or Toll Free 1-866-535-2887 195 McDougal Road Fort Smith NT X0E 0P0 HappyAboriginalDay Dr. Kobaisys Dental Clinic COMPLETE CARE FAMILY DENTISTRY HYGIENIST Monday to Friday Clinic Hours Monday - Friday 830 am - 500 pm Phone number 1-867-872-2887 Book for your cleaning Ask about our teeth whitening Denture repair and denture cleaning AboriginalDay Day Day 872-2568 Serv ing Fort Smith since 1990 Mon-Fri Sat Sun 9 a.m. - 8 p.m. 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. 11a.m. - 6 p.m. Happy Aboriginal Day A salute to all aboriginal members of our communities on this special day. Thank you for your role in making Canada a great place to live Walk-in patients are welcome T 867-872-2887 or Toll Free 1-866-535-2887 195 McDougal Road Fort Smith NT X0E 0P0 HappyAboriginalDay Dr. Kobaisys Dental Clinic COMPLETE CARE FAMILY DENTISTRY HYGIENIST Monday to Friday Clinic Hours Monday - Friday 830 am - 500 pm Phone number 1-867-872-2887 Book for your cleaning Ask about our teeth whitening Denture repair and denture cleaning July 3 July 4 July 5 July 7 July 8 July 13 July 14 July 15 July 16 July 17 Cambridge Bay 100 pm Resolute 300 pm Pond Inlet 130 pm Gjoa Haven 12 noon Yellowknife 130 pm Whitehorse 200 pm Inuvik 330 pm Tuktoyaktuk 1030 am Fort Good Hope 100 pm Norman Wells 100 pm PhotoWikipediaCommons A de Havilland Twin Otter DHC6 200 Series rests at the Cambridge Bay Airport in Nunavut. Tuesday June 23 2015 17 NORTHERNERS TEACHERS building your community workforce Are you looking for ways to bring training and work experience opportunities into your community Do you need funding to employ youth in your community this summer ECE can help. The Small Community Employment Support Program provides assistance to both youth and adults to gain work experience and secure jobs in eligible small communities. Two program streams develop workplace capacity and youth employment Youth Employment Training-on-the-Job provides a wage subsidy for employers in small and remote communities and Community Initiatives provides project based funding for training delivered through partnerships. Contact us today to talk about how our programs and services can support capacity building in your community. Applications submitted before July 1 2015 are given priority. For more information www.ece.gov.nt.caece-service-centres building your community workforceAre you looking for ways to bring training opportunities for older workers into your community Do you need funding for projects that provide training to individuals between the ages of 55 and 64 ECE can help. The Targeted Initiative for Older Workers Program provides assistance to organizations working with older individuals who want to improve their chances of getting or keeping a job. We are looking for projects that provide group-based programming for older workers. These projects will ensure that individuals between the ages of 55 and 64 can gain the skills they need to successfully compete for jobs and continue to contribute to the economic growth of their communities. Contact us today to talk about your project ideas and to receive the preliminary project proposal application form. Applications submitted before July 1 2015 are given priority. For more details contact Lesleigh Grice Coordinator Career Development Training phone 867-920-3391 email Lesleigh_Gricegov.nt.ca Fort Chipewyans original college instructor retires By DALI CARMICHAEL After almost four decades of teaching stu- dents at Keyano Colleges Fort Chipewyan campus the institutions rst-ever instruc- tor has decided to graduate into retirement. MaureenClarkeateacherwhostartedoutin the Northland School Division before crossing overtopost-secondaryeducationcelebratedher retirement with an intimate group of friends familyfacultyandformerstudentsonJune16. Ive been teaching all along said Clarke whostartedhercareerasanelementaryteacher with the Northland School Board in 1968. Whenavocationalcollegeopenedinthecom- munityin1977Clarkewasoneoftherststaff members brought on board. Eventually that school was taken over by Keyano and Clarke was absorbed into the new organization. When I started out I was the only instruc- tor she said. We did it all and then as we started to grow we moved into different fa- cilities and more staff were hired. In her 38 years with the college Clarke taught mostly math and science courses to students attaining their Grade 12 equivalen- cies or taking college-prep classes. She is a very committed instructor very in tunewithstudentssaidLeonaRistauafellow instructor and friend of Clarkes. They are her priority and she is an amazing woman. Amaz- ing.Studentslovehersheworkswithgoodpro- gramsshehassomefantasticresultsandforme as a new member when we came 13 years ago shewascertainlyagoodmentorandrolemodel. Clarke also took leadership roles outside of the classroom sitting on boards for the North- land School Divisions district improvement advisory council and the Education North society which eventually evolved into the Fort Chip Historical Society and Museum. Fort Chip is a great place to live and work the people are great the scenery is beautiful Clarke said. It seems like weve got the best of both worlds here weve got a little bit of nature andwecangetoutandgoshoppingifwehaveto. Making a life in northern Alberta Clarke didnt always call Fort Chipewyan home. After growing up in rural Irma Alta. she moved to the hamlet with her husband Tommy Clarke a mechanic at the Sweetgrass Landing sawmill who hails from the region. Sheremembersatimewhenrunningwaterand electricitywerenotpresentineveryhousehold. Changes are just almost astronomical in a short time when you think about it. When we rst came there was no radio station even she said. I still remember when the rst jet landed in Fort Chip. Thetechnologythathelpedadvancecommu- nicationstransportationandlivingstandards inthecommunityalsoimpactedtheclassroom - not always for the better Clarke noted. I think the major change that was very dif- cult for the students was the advent of online learningshesaid.Thestudentsheredomuch better with interpersonal relations and face to facerelationshipsandthatkindofpersonalsup- port.Internetattimesiskindofacoldenviron- mentwithoutthatsocialaspecttoit.Ithinkthe youngerpeoplethestudentstheyrelosingsome of their social skills and they react much better with a cellphone than they do with ears in per- son.Andyetyoucantknocktechnologybecause it has opened up many spheres of learning and discoverythatwedidnthavebefore.Therehas to be a nice mix and mesh of the two. Clarkesaidshedoesntliketodwellonthetough timeschoosinginsteadtofocusonthepositive experiences shes had during her long career. Every student thats succeeded thats what you remember Clarke said. You dont remember the few bad days along the way. Some of the students have been so excited when they got their grade 12 its like they see the world through new eyes. PhotoMichaelBeckerKeyanoCollege Keyano College instructor Maureen Clarke right with Terry Marten one of her rst students. The two reunited at Clarkes retirement party held on June 16. Say it in 25 words or less for only 3.50 Extra words are 20 centseach.Businessclassifieds are 10 for 30 words and 25 centsforeach additionalword. E-mail your advertising to adsnorj.ca or fax it to 872-2754 or call 872-3000 ext. 26 FOR SALE FIREWOOD. Cus- tom cut sizes - split green dry bagged. Wood Gasification Outdoor wood boilers. Delivery from Fort Smith to Hay River Yellowknife. Contact Dave at 867 872-3435 or cell 872-0229 or email dhehnnorthwestel. net. UFN FORT SMITH CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING BLANKET CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Blanket advertising reaches all 122 weekly newspapers in Alberta and the NWT with a combined circulation of over a million readers. Call our Northern Journal sales desk at 867-872-3000ex.26fordetails. COMMUNITY TRADING POST If you operate a business and need affordable advertising call the Northern Journal. Find out how to have your business listed in our Service Directory. Call 867 872-3000 or email adsnorj.ca. Northern Journal Directory Get your name out there 18 Tuesday June 23 2015 Home Heating Oil For on-time or anytime delivery...call 100 Locally owned and operated 1 Breynat Street Fort Smith NT 872-4567 Petroleum Whispering Pines Cottages Serving you with 50 years experience Please Contact Sandra Robichaud PhoneFax 867 872-2906 - Cell 867 621-0254 85 Pine Crescent P.O. 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WERE HIRING A SENIOR SALES ASSOCIATE IN OUR FORT SMITH STORE Are you organized motivated and passionate about customer service Our Fort Smith store needs you Email your resume and references to hrfields.ca or drop them off at the store 81 King Street. Please be sure to include the location and position. Photos wanted for 2016 Fort Smith Pet Desk Calendar Filling up fast Get your pictures in soon Ifyouwouldliketohavephotosofyour petstakenarrangementscanbemade. Please call Chris at 872-5547. Becauseofthehighvolumeofrequests we are on a first come first in basis. Special consideration will be made for pets not in previous calendars. Please submit photos of living pets only. Thereisnofeetohavephotosinthecalendar. If you have any questions or need more information please call Chris at 872-5547 or email dewolfnorthwestel.net Deadline is August 31 This ad sponsored by the Northern Journal EMPLOYMENT TENDERS AND LEGAL NOTICES Tuesday June 23 2015 19 VISIT WWW.NORJ.CA EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY The Town of Fort Smith has an opportunity for a highly qualified individual responsible for the imple- mentation of strategies projects and events that promote and strengthen the economy of Fort Smith. The incumbent will facilitate economic development planning and initiatives identify and foster community economic development opportunities secure funding for economic development activities and programs and promote the community in order to expand economic development opportunities. The ideal candidate will have a post-secondary degree in marketing communications business administration or tourism management or a diploma with two years experience in marketing public relations or tourism promotion or equivalent combination of education and experience. Salary Benefits Salary is Pay level 20 range from 63478.46 to 73206.78. The Town also provides a Northern Allowance of 7715.79 annually comprehensive health dental benefits and a pension plan provided by Northern Employees Benefits Services. Closing Date July 3 2015 To view a job description please visit our website at www.fortsmith.ca Qualified candidates are invited to forward their resume to Director of Corporate Services Town of Fort Smith Box 147 174 McDougal Road Fort Smith NT X0E 0P0 Fax 867 872-8401 Email receptionfortsmith.ca Only applicants selected for interview will be contacted. Resumes may be kept on file for future consideration. Town of Fort Smith Economic Development Officer EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY TITLE TECHNICAL SUPPORT ANALYST Location Corner of Highways 3 and 4 Yellowknife NT X1A 2P7 Reporting to the Director Information Technology the Technical Support Analyst provides effective and timely operational and technical support to computer users concerning system applications hardware and software. They also contribute to the efficient allocation of computer hardware and software resources develops and maintains business applications and ensures the reliability and sustainability of information and communication resources through system administration responsibilities. Education Diploma in Computer Science from a recognized university or college institution. ITIL certification encouraged. Qualifications Good project management and system development experience applicable to information system deployments. Excellent communication interpersonal customer service and problem solving skills in order to listen to train and assist users in identifying needs and resolvingproblems.Excellentanalyticalhardware and software troubleshooting skills to address problems presented by users. Over 10 years of IT systems and technical support experience related to business and systems applications tele- communications and minicomputers preferred. Salary and Benefits Salary range is 43.34 to 52.67 per hour plus location and accommodation allowances of approximately 8592 per annum. This is a full-time permanent position. We offer a comprehensive benefits package which includes health and dental benefits long-term disability life insurance paid sick days and a defined pension plan. Please send rsums to Human Resources Northwest Territories Power Corporation 4 Capital Drive Hay River NT X0E 1G2. Fax 867 874-5229. Email careersntpc.com. Competition 10-YK-15 Closing date Open until suitable candidate found. Affirmative Action Employer - Candidates must clearly identify eligibility status in order to receive priority consideration. We thank all those who apply and advise that only those selected for further consideration will be contacted. Empowering Communities 12345 12345 3 wide version 3.75 wide version Place your ad in this newspaper and province wide with a combined circulation of over 800000 for only... 995plus GSTHST Value Ad Network Alberta Weekly Newspapers Association toll free 1-800-282-6903 x228 email andreaawna.com or visit this community newspaper the most out of your advertising dollarssqueeze Place your ad in this newspaper and province wide with a combined circulation of over 800000 for only... 995plus GSTHST Value Ad Network Alberta Weekly Newspapers Association toll free 1-800-282-6903 x228 email andreaawna.com or visit this community newspaper the most out of your advertising dollarssqueeze Program-value-ad.indd 1 72511 1230 PM 12345 12345 3 wide version 3.75 wide version HAVE THE EXPERIENCE OF A LIFETIMEOF A LIFETIME Are you a Mtis youthbetween 18-30 Do you seek a greater connection to your community Through volunteering you will learn to lead and connect to your community while you gain valuable employment skills and exposure to post-secondary education. Application Deadline July 132015 Program RunsAug 4 Dec 162015 Call1-888-48-MTIS 1-888-486-3847 online atwww.metisemployment.ca Funded in part by the Government of Canada. HAVE THE EXPERIENCE OF A LIFETIMEOF A LIFETIMEOF A LIFETIME Are you a Mtis youthbetween 18-30 Do you seek a greater connection to your community Through volunteering you will learn to lead and connect to your community while you gain valuable employment skills and exposure to post-secondary education. Application Deadline July 132015 Program RunsAug 4 Dec 162015 Call1-888-48-MTIS 1-888-486-3847 online atwww.metisemployment.ca Funded in part by the Government of Canada. 20 Tuesday June 23 2015 SPORTS RECREATION PADDLING AuroraCollegewouldliketothankthesponsorsof this years Aurora Open fundraising tournament. Through the generous support of our sponsors the 17th annual Aurora Open raised 8000.00 for the annual NWT Youth Symposium 17th Annual Aurora Open www.auroracollege.nt.ca Corporate Sponsors NorthwesTel NWT Power Corp Dr. Stephen Prest Northern Store Dominion Diamonds Prize Sponsors Kaesers Phoenix Automotive Touch of Heaven Berros Pizzeria Shear Fun Northwestern Air Lease Lous Small Engines Pelican Rapids Golf Country Club Northern Store Street Treats Wallys Drugs Paddlers celebrate summer solstice on the Slave River Adam Bathe surfs a wave in his kayak on the rapids at Mountain Portage on the Slave River. Jeff and Vina Turner and their baby Josie enjoy the longest day of the year along the Slave River. Paddlers warm up with a fire and some food on Sunday evening. John Blyth plays with a stand-up paddle board on the wave train at Mountain Portage. PhotosDaliCarmichael Tuesday June 23 2015 21 SPORTS RECREATION SOCCER LTD. Gold medal Olympic soccer player inspires NWT youth By DALI CARMICHAEL Young soccer players from the NWT got to spend time with one of the pros last week as U.S. Olympic gold medalist Lori Lindsey toured around the North Slave region giv- ing tips and tricks for life on and off the eld. The trip was part of the U.S. Department of States Sports United Envoy Program whereby athletes and coaches travel around the globe to lead programs developed by U.S. embassies and consulates. Keeping in theme with Canadas hosting duties of this years FIFA Womens World Cup tournament the Pan Am games and Para Pan games Lindsey said sending out a female soccer player for this years Canadian envoy just made sense. The goal is to ultimately just empower and get young females excited about the sport but all kids as well especially in some of these communities where they dont have as many resources to go there and help teach soccer but get them excited and ultimately have a tonne of fun doing it. For me Ive had a long career and the thing that kept me going was just playing and enjoying the sport. Lindsey a retired midelder for the na- tional U.S. team and a gold medalist in the 2012 Olympic Games in London was ac- companied by members of the NWT Soccer organization as she spent time traveling the NWT from June 18 to 22. Lindsey engaged in speaker sessions and games with school kids in Fort Providence Behchoko and Yellowknife where she spent the weekend. There she geared up for a few drills and a fun game with this years Western Arctic Games ages 14-16 womens soccer team as they completed their recruitment camp over the weekend. Instead of doing some of the drills we just put them into groups so we were able to play games Lindsey said. I would jump in as much as I could and play alongside them. I would stop it and just give them pointers in different areas of the game but for the most part we just wanted to get them running around sweating and laughing and playing. Before taking in some of the Aboriginal Day events in Yellowknife she also played with youth at this weekends Ombrelle Ac- tive Start Festival a fun day full of soccer for kids 12 and under. After hanging up her cleats in December Lindsey is ofcially retired from the eld. Her envoy to the NWT which followed a similar trip to Vancouver is only the rst of many similar trips around the world for the athlete. As much as Lindsey enjoys the envoy ex- perience she said the children seem to love it even more. It just opens up their eyes to see what else they could potentially do or how far they could go with their sport said Lyric Sandhals executive director of the NWT Soccer Association. We dont know or the kids dont see that theres more that they can go play university or they can try out for na- tional teams. Just for them to see that there is a development pathway and to hear her story and what it took - the dedication and the amount of hard work that was needed to get there - I think that was just really good for the kids to see. With long distances between the regions of the territory having ofcial soccer clubs that play against one another can be difcult but Sandhals said the sport has a history of being very popular in the NWT especially in freeplay formats. What we want to do is try to get into the communities and make sure they have their coaches or volunteers trained and that they have equipment Sandhals said. We want to make sure there is development going on so we can eld teams for future games and get more kids involved. For those kids who missed out on the chance to play with Lindsey the NWT Soccer Association will be hosting training camps throughout the months of June and July. For details head to httpswww.nwtkicks.ca PhotocourtesyofU.S.ConsulateGeneral-Calgary Professional soccer player Lori Lindsey works through some drills with youth at the Ombrelle Active Start Festival while visiting Yellowknife on June 20. 22 Tuesday June 23 2015 ARTS CULTURE FESTIVALS 6.8103 in x 6.3125 in By DALI CARMICHAEL Want to learn how to nail your audition for Folk on the Rocks Or how the festivals iconic owl logo came to be These secrets are revealed at the 35 Years of Folk exhibition which kicked off this weekend at the Centre Square Mall in Yellowknife. Formonthsthedisplaywaslovinglycurated by folkers Aine Kavanagh and Alexis Dirks. It showcases memorabilia from throughout the history of the NWTs foremost festival giving insight into the evolution of the North- ern summertime staple. We have an awful lot of stuff both in the Folk on the Rocks archives and among the people of Yellowknife Kavanaugh said. We thought it would be nice to bring it all together and showcase it in some way. Boxes of photographs from basements across the country have been unearthed and organized some seeing the light of day for the rst time in almost four decades. Its going to be pretty interactive whereby people who attend the exhibition were ask- ing them to help us tag the photos with dates and the names of people and memories Ka- vanaugh said. We have a lot of images that are undated that feature tonnes and tonnes of people from the last 35 years. Visitors to the exhibit can expect to see a wall display showing 35 t-shirts each com- memorating a years worth of volunteers who have helped to keep the festival alive. Folk on the Rocks really has been made possible by the volunteers since the very rst festival in 1980 Kavanaugh said. Music lovers reect on 35 years of Folk on the Rocks Archived footage from CBC North plays in the background showing scenes from the rst ever Folk on the Rocks. Old posters and programs some with original sitemaps and performer lineups paint pictures of music lovers dancing to Canadian music at the height of Yellowknifes summers. Some years were rained out oth- ers suffered from poor marketing efforts but still the crowds always seemed to come back. Weve got stories that Ive found in some of the really early programs Dirks said. They used to print things around music anecdotes interesting things like How to survive your Folk on the Rocks audition theres another story about womens music theres one I printed about how the owl logo originated and the artist who designed it sort of talks about the meaning of that symbol and how that relates to music and the festival. Theres just information thats happened since the beginning up until now that I think people will nd interesting. Throughout the run of the exhibition kin- dergarten through Grade 6 students from almost all of the Yellowknife schools will be attending festival-sponsored visual arts workshops in an effort to promote the arts in the community. Were going to give the students a quick tour of the exhibition and talk to them about the owl logo and how it originated and what they think it means Kavanaugh said. We have the owl logo printed out on large pieces of canvas so were going to get the students to do a large collaborative collage and cre- ate their own owl character then were going to display those at the kids section at the festival. The exhibit opened Friday with an inti- mate event and will remain open to the pub- lic until June 25. Folk on the Rocks runs this year from July 17 to 19. PhotoAineKavanagh A collage of Folk on the Rocks volunteer t-shirts from over the years is only one of the memorabilia collections featured in the 35 Years of Folk Exhibition taking place until June 25. 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Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2561 SALE PRICE 28238 MSRP 58899 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 4513 SALE PRICE 45136f 2013 F-150 SuperCrew Fx4 4x4 I3T664 MSRP 29049 Delivery Allowance 4250 Kingland Discount 1429 SALE PRICE 23370 2013 Focus TITANIUM 0 down 220 5.69 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3A08 2013 F150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 MSRP 43349 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2957 SALE PRICE 31142 0 down 278 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months T671 0 down 252 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months CallTinyToday forPre-approval 1-800-661-0716 E-mail us to subscribe to our quarterly newsletter inquirykinglandford.com 0 down only 399 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months KINGLAND FORD SALES LTD 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867-874-7716 E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.com Tina Duggan Finance Manager Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Lorraine Peterson Fleet Manager Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales 643 Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Matt Morse Sales Leasing Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing DonneLeeJungkind Vehicle RV Sales LorrainePeterson Fleet Manager Tina Melvin Finance Manager 2013 F150 SuperCab XLT 4x4 MSRP 40049 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2561 SALE PRICE 28238 MSRP 58899 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 4513 SALE PRICE 45136f 2013 F-150 SuperCrew Fx4 4x4 I3T664 MSRP 29049 Delivery Allowance 4250 Kingland Discount 1429 SALE PRICE 23370 2013 Focus TITANIUM 0 down 220 5.69 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3A08 2013 F150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 MSRP 43349 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2957 SALE PRICE 31142 0 down 278 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months 671 0 down 252 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months CallTinyToday forPre-approval 1-800-661-0716 E-mail us to subscribe to our quarterly newsletter inquirykinglandford.com 0 down only 399 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months KINGLAND FORD SALES LTD 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867-874-7716 E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.com Tina Duggan Finance Manager Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Lorraine Peterson Fleet Manager Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Matt Morse Sales Leasing Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing DonneLeeJungkind Vehicle RV Sales LorrainePeterson Fleet Manager Tina Melvin Finance Manager 2013 F150 SuperCab XLT 4x4 MSRP 40049 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2561 SALE PRICE 28238 MSRP 58899 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 4513 SALE PRICE 45136f 2013 F-150 SuperCrew Fx4 4x4 I3T664 MSRP 29049 Delivery Allowance 4250 Kingland Discount 1429 SALE PRICE 23370 2013 Focus TITANIUM 0 down 220 5.69 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3A08 2013 F150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 MSRP 43349 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2957 SALE PRICE 31142 0 down 278 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months 0 down 252 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months CallTinyToday forPre-approval 1-800-661-0716 E-mail us to subscribe to our quarterly newsletter inquirykinglandford.com 0 down only 399 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months THE 2013S HAVE TO GO Santas not the only one giving things away this December Check out these deals at Kingland in Hay River PLUS get 500to use towards accessories or maintenence plans with every 2013 purchase. 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867-874-7716 E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.com www.kinglandsaleshr.com Tina Melvin Finance Manager Call Tina today for Pre-approval 1-800-661-0716 THE ALL-NEW 2015 F-150 XLT FOR 24 MONTHS WITH 2000 DOWN PAYMENT. OFFER EXCLUDES TAXES. THATS LIKE 294BI-WEEKLY LEASE FOR ONLY 637 0.00APR PER MONTH Lariat Model Shown Recycleyoureligible2008oroldervehicleandgetbetween 1000- 2500towardsmostnew2015FordVehicles. RECYCLE YOUR RIDE IS BACK ITS EASY TO GET INTO A FORD WHEN YOU CAN LEASE A NEW F-150 EVERY 2YEARS 24 Tuesday June 23 2015 Clbrations de la Fte du Canada Fort Smith Canada Day Celebrations People interested in a booth at the Street Market please contact Town Hall 2015 Fort Smith Canada Day Parade Route 2015 Fort Smith2015 Fort Smith Canada Day Parade Route 2015 Fort Smith2015 Fort Smith2015 Fort Smith2015 Fort Smith2015 Fort Smith2015 Fort Smith2015 Fort Smith Parade Start Parade Finish Parade Route The parade will set up and start in the parking lot behind the Post Office. The parade will proceed down McDougal Rd. to Mill St. and continue on to Riverside Park. Canada Day Parade RouteCanada Day Parade RouteCanada Day Parade RouteCanada Day Parade RouteCanada Day Parade Route The parade will set up and start in the parking lot behind the Post Office. The parade will proceed down McDougal Rd. to Mill St. and continue on to Riverside Park. The parade will set up and start in the parking lot behind the Post Office. The parade will proceed down McDougal Rd. to Mill St. and continue on to Riverside Park. Parade Start Parade Start ParadeParadeParadeParade StartStartStartStartStartStartStartStart Parade Start Parade Finish Parade Finish ParadeParadeParadeParade FinishFinishFinishFinish Parade Finish Parade RouteParade RouteParade RouteParade RouteParade RouteParade RouteParade RouteParade RouteParade RouteParade RouteParade Route 1100 am Parade judging Jugement de la parade 1130 am Canada Day Parade La Parade de la Fte du Canada 100 pm Flag raising and the singing of O Canada Llevage du drapeau et le chant de O Canada 115 pm Protocol ceremony and awards Crmonie du protocole et des prix 130 pm Cake cutting ceremony Crmonie de la coupage de la gteau 130 pm Street market and kids games March de rue et jeux des enfants 130 pm Music by P.W.K. High School Band Musique par la bande dcole secondaire P.W.K. 200 pm Fish fry Friture des poissons 200 pm Softball game Jeu de balle-molle 200 pm Kite flying Aviation des cerfs-volants 200 pm Elders cribbage tournament Tournoi de cribbage pour des ans 50th Anniversary of the Canadian Flag July 1st 2015 River Side Park 50me anniversaire du drapeau du Canada 1er juillet 2015 parc River Side