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UNESCO to review industrial threats to Wood Buffalo park UNESCOsworldheritagecom- mittee will be visiting Wood BuffaloNationalParktocheck on environmental concerns regarding hydro and oilsands. See page 3. Womens workshops aim to empower through ceremony Traditional indigenous cul- tural knowledge will be the focus of a series of womens workshops in Fort Smith next week. See page 19. HAPPY HAY DAYS Hundreds turned out for Hay Rivers annual music and arts fest. See page 13. Food trucks take to NWT streets in time for summer Check out the hottest meals on wheels in the Northwest Territories this summer with the Northern Journals food truck guide. See page 7. Fort Smith ofcer receives medal of bravery An ofcer from Fort Smith NWT was awarded a medal of bravery for an incident that occurred during his tour in Afghanistan. See page 9. V IS IT W W W .N O R J.C A A national award winning independent newspaper serving northern Alberta and the Northwest Territories since 1977 1.00 July 7 2015 Vol. 39 No. 10 PhotoPaulBannister Firefighters stretched thin as drought consumes western Canada By MEAGAN WOHLBERG No one is at rest at this time. Thats the general situation for reghters across western Canada right now according to Frank Lep- ine director of forest management forNWTsEnvironmentandNatural ResourcesENRandcertainlytrue of the Northwest Territories where all28ve-personcrewsareengaged along with an additional 100 emer- gencyreghtersdoingmop-upwork. Those crews have been joined by 85 personnel imported mostly from Ontario - one of the only places in thecountryabletosupplyadditional resources while Saskatchewan and Alberta evacuate thousands from their northern communities and smoke pours into cities typically immune from the burning boreal forest like Vancouver and Victoria. The cupboard is empty Lepine said. Right now the country is on level ve which is the highest level its ever been on. I dont know if weve ever experienced a situation like Saskatchewan before. He said Canada is looking at importing human resources from Australia New Zealand and South While some rain and cooler weather has aided containment efforts in the NWT Lepine worries what will happen when the drought rebounds next week when temperatures are The res that were not action- ing we can expect a lot of growth on them...Were going to see a lot of smokyconditionsoverthenextwhile. Risks to Hay River Jean Marie River dissipate Still the momentary downturn has helped avoid total disaster for at least two NWT communities. Hay River which was put on alert for evacuation and whose outer estates voluntarily evacuated last week after a re came within a few kilometres of peoples homes saw favourable wind conditions allow ENR crews to doze cat guards and conductburnoutoperationsbetween the blaze and the community. Crews are now mopping up hotspots in the area and are wait- ing for weather to become favour- able once more to conduct a nal burnout that will protect the com- munity from the southeast. See Lack of water on page 2. Africa while Alberta has already brought in reghters from Mexico. Theres very few resources avail- ablesoCanadaislookinginternation- ally for help Lepine said. The big issuebecomesafterawhileyouhave torecycleallthesepeople.Theyhave to have breaks and you need relief. To date there have been 195 res in the NWT with 145 still burning. predicted to rise with no chance of precipitation. Thats when the bad news starts. Ourmeteorologistissayingstarting Sundayandforaboutatwo-weekpe- riod well get a high pressure ridge buildingovertheNorthwestTerrito- riesandforatwo-weekperiodwell see some high temperatures very windywarmconditionsLepinesaid. The cupboard is empty...Theres very few resources available so Canada is looking internationally for help. Frank Lepine Environment Natural Resources Roan Foye-Doucette catches a ride on the Mtis oat in the Fort Smith Canada Day Parade. The whole community came together to watch the patriotic display before enjoying events and a sh fry lunch at Riverside Park for the countrys 148th birthday. For more head to pages 10 11. 2 Tuesday July 7 2015 ENVIRONMENT WILDFIRES NEWS BRIEFS RCMP seize incoming liquor on its way into Tulita Deline Just in time for Canada Day RCMP ofcers made seizures of illegal alcohol entering the restricted communities of Tulita and Deline. The rst took place on June 25 when Tulita RCMP intercepted a boat with 31 small bottles of al- coholand32cansofbeer.Twolocalmaleswereinvolvedin the seizures and charges are pending. The next day in De- line RCMP responded to a complaint of an over-rationed amount of alcohol being own in seizing 52 small bottles of vodka. An investigation is ongoing. Car accident shuts down Alberta Hwy 63 at intersection with Hwy 881 OneofAlbertasdeadliestjunctionsclosedlastweekasemer- gencyrespondersfoughtoffamesatthesiteofacaraccident at the intersection of Hwy 63 and Hwy 881 on June 30. A dieseltruckignitedaftercollidingwithanSUVaround630 p.m. that day. Both the north and south-bound lanes of the highway were closed for hours as reghters contained the ames. An investigation in ongoing to determine the cause of the accident and damage to the highway surface. Wine liquor stolen from Fort Simpson golf course Fort Simpsons Seven Spruce golf course was victim to two break and enters in the last week of June the rst which led to stolen goods. After receiving a report of a break-in on June 26 local RCMP found about150 worth of wine and liquor stolen from the clubhouse. A second attempted break and enter took place on June 29 and though entry was not gained signicant damage was done to the exterior of the building. Police are asking anyone with information to come forward. Workshops Discussion Forum Reclaiming Traditional Matriarchal July 13 -16 2015 6pm 10pm Uncle Gabes Friendship Centre 112Conibear Crescent Fort Smith NT Contact Amy Harris Youth Coordinator UGFC Use subject heading Indigenous Womens Workshop 2015 amyharrisychotmail.com 867-872-3004 Sponsored by GNWT and Uncle Gabes Friendship Centre Art by Jackie Traverse Priority will be given to Indigenous Women Female Youth although all are welcome to apply. Space is limited. Continued from page 1. A total of 60 reghters are actively working on the situation and sprinkler sys- tems are protecting homes and other values in the area. A lot of effort has gone into protecting houses and infrastructure along the cor- ridor Lepine said. InJeanMarieRiverwhere a re 3 km from the commu- nitysawresidentsevacuatelast weekcrewshavebeenableto contain 90 per cent of the re andshouldhaveitwrappedup by the end of the week. Explosives used to create ponds in drought areas Apart from the res near Hay River and Jean Marie River ENR is also actioning two other complexes with the potential to impact commu- nities and infrastructure. Around 27 km northeast of Fort Providence crews and dozers are working on putting out a 5000-hectare blaze challenged by a lack of locally sourced water. Lepine saidcrewshavehadtouseex- plosives to blast out articial pondsinordertoghtthere inanarearavagedbydrought. Generally theres no real deep ponds to work with or so on but this year especially with the drought theres no water available Lepine said. We have to look really hard to nd water sources and it seems to be a common occur- rence when you talk to other jurisdictions. NearFortSimpsontheAn- toineComplex-aseriesofseven res-continuestorequirework. Though ve of the res have been brought under control thelargest-at10000hectares -willtakeanotherthreetofour weekstobecontained.Thatre is approximately 35 km south of Fort Simpson. Close to 50 res in Wood Buffalo Park Fireghters in Wood Buf- faloNationalParkcontinueto focus on three complexes the primary one being a set of 10 res stretching 70 km along Highway5westofFortSmith. Parks Canada wildland re management personnel willbeconductingoperations adjacent to NWT Highway 5 tomanageagroupofresthat resulted from signicant re- cent lightning activity. These operations include helicop- ters working in the area and crews and heavy equipment alongsidethehighwayParks spokespeople announced Monday afternoon. Park staffarefocussedonminimiz- ingtheimpactofthesereson thehighwayandthepowerand Onereburning3kmwest oftheNorthTallcreeFirstNa- tion a small community of about 100 people located east of High Level was evacuated last week as a precaution. On Sundayheavyequipmentwas able to complete a 14 km re- guard on the north side of the community. That re is now around6000hectaresinsize. Two of the four out of con- trol res burning 11 km north of Meander River on the west side of Highway 35 are now being held and are not Lack of water impacting reghting Fire crews have been able to set up reguards using heavy equipment and burnout operations between the Paradise Complex and the community of Hay River which was put on alert for possible evacuation last week. PhotoDaliCarmichael telecommunicationsinfrastruc- ture in the highway corridor. ParksCanadaisworkingwith NorthwesTel and the NWT Power Corporation to safe- guard critical infrastructure. Personnelarealsoworking on a set of res known as the SouthSlavecomplexnearHay Camp and another series of res around the Peace River from Garden River to Moose Island and south to the Birch River. Those large res are causing significant smoke impacting air road and river travelcorridors.Theroadfrom Peace Point to Moose Island maybeclosedonshortnotice. More than 20 res in the High Level area FiresnearHighLevelAlta. continued to challenge crews and kept a special air qual- ity statement in effect for the area over the weekend. expected to grow past cur- rent boundaries. Residents of Meander River have been placed on evacuation alert. A wildre burning 50 km west of High Level south of Highway 58 is out of control and over 28000 hectares. Close to 160 reghters are managing the blaze and cat guards are being established on the north and northeast sides of the re. Two more res are burning north and northwest of the Steen River west of Highway 35. One located 12 km north is now under control while the one 24 km northwest is out of control and closing in on 10000 hectares. This re is affecting visibility along Highway 35. Smoke is expected to be heavy again early this week. The wildre hazard for the area continues to be extreme. With the drought theres no water available. We have to look really hard to nd water sources and it seems to be a common occurrence when you talk to other jurisdictions. Frank Lepine Environment Natural Resources Tuesday July 7 2015 3 ENVIRONMENT CONSERVATION whileyoudrivewhileyoudrivewhileyoudrivewhileyoudrivewhileyoudrivewhileyoudrivewhileyoudrive TIRE NORTH LTD. 917 MACKENZIE HWY HAY RIVER NT X0E 0R8 867 874-2686 GET A SET OF CUSTOM WHEELS AT By MEAGAN WOHLBERG The United Nations UNESCO world heri- tage committee is urging Canada to delay any decisions on development projects that could irreversibly impact Wood Buffalo National Park including BC Hydros Site C dam in response to a petition put forth by the Miki- sew Cree First Nation. The Mikisew petitioned the UN body for education science and culture to add the world heritage site to its list of sites in dan- ger in December 2014 citing impacts from hydroelectric dams and oilsands mining on the Peace-Athabasca Delta. That petition was backed by former Parks Canada ofcials sci- entists NGOs and other indigenous groups. Last week the committee met in Bonn Germany and decided the petition merited a fact-nding mission to the park which has been a UNESCO site since 1983. Its been overwhelming. Just being here this week weve received a lot of support Melody Lepine director of Mikisews govern- ment and industry relations told the Journal from Germany. Were just really pleased with thedraftdecisionthatwentthroughsoquickly andwithoutanychanges.Therewasnodebate no discussion it just went through so easily. In its decision the world heritage commit- tee noted the lack of First Nations participa- tion in oilsands monitoring efforts and af- rmed concerns raised in the International Union for Conservation of Natures IUCN 2014 World Heritage Outlook about the im- pacts of dams on the delta. The committee has requested that Canada undertake a strategic environmental assess- ment to address the cumulative impacts of hydro and oilsands development within the park and to not take any decision related to any of these development projects that would be difcult to reverse. When I read that it almost sounds like Canada shouldnt be giving any approvals Lepine said. How Canadas interpreting that though is to be determined. A joint monitoring mission composed of UNESCO and IUCN representatives will now be visiting the park to review the impacts of development evaluate its state of conser- vation and to carry out more in-depth con- versations with Parks Canada the Mikisew Cree First Nation provincial governments and other stakeholders like BC Hydro and oilsands companies. It seems thorough that theyre indepen- dent and unbiased. Theyre going there to study and determine if the impacts weve in- dicated in our petition are what they are so thats their way of going there and validating everything Lepine said. Parks Canada will also be required to sub- mit an updated report on the state of conser- vation in the park for UNESCO examination by Dec. 1 2016. Concerns overstated Parks Canada In its submission to the UNESCO commit- tee Parks Canada called the concerns raised by Mikisew overstated and said the conser- vation situation is far from critical. The petitioners refer to a number of spe- cific proposed developments outside the park including the proposed Site C Dam on the Peace River in British Columbia and pro- posed mining activity in proximity to Wood Buffalos southern boundary. It is important to recognize that Canada has - at both the federal and provincial levels - robust envi- ronmental assessment and permitting pro- cesses states the letter from Parks Canadas George Green head of the Canadian delega- tion to the world heritage committee. The governments of Canada and Alberta are committed to developing the oil sands... in an environmentally responsible way Green added. Since Mikisew led its petition Green said Parks Canada outlined a number of new com- mitments in relation to issues raised by the First Nation which include continued moni- toring of water levels on the Peace River and delta enhanced monitoring and research on the effects of ow regulation and climate change on biodiversity in the delta and in- creased discussions with Aboriginal groups BC Hydro and the Alberta and B.C. govern- ments on management practices to protect the delta. Management actions needed now Mikisew Though Mikisew is aware of those commit- ments Lepine said there has been no indica- tion that theyre being implemented. While Mikisew participates in Parks Canadas Peace Athabasca Delta Environmental Monitoring Program PADEMP she said there are few management outcomes. PADEMP doesnt seem to have a lot of funding and it doesnt seem to be operat- ing under a management process in deal- ing with anything that they do nd. Theyre strictly just focused on monitoring so how does that tie into any legislation and report- ing from Canada to UNESCO on how theyre managing this world heritage site Lepine said. Canadas made some commitments of working further with us. Were yet to see what that looks like because we havent had any conversations yet about those commitments. Apart from the petition Mikisew is one of many First Nations who have led judicial reviews of the Site C dam approval in B.C. If constructed the BC Hydro project would be the third dam on the Peace River. Land-us- ers in the Peace-Athabasca Delta have com- plained of massive landscape changes due to existing hydro projects and fear a third will have irreversible impacts on the delta and their traditional way of life. Construction is expected to begin this summer. We feel there has been no consultation and specically because weve been asking Canada throughout the whole process regard- ing Site C to assess the impacts on the delta on the world heritage site Lepine said. For Canada to say its not going to impact this site and the delta they have no evidence to prove that because they didnt even include the delta in their regional study area. They didnt look at impacts that far downstream. Lepine said Mikisew is now preparing for next years world heritage committee UNESCO to review hydro oilsands threats to Wood Buffalo National Park Canada asked to withhold approving projects that could impact delta meeting in Istanbul Turkey where the nd- ings of the mission will likely be presented and a decision could be made on the re- quest to have the park listed as a UNESCO site in danger. PhotocourtesyofParksCanada The worlds largest beaver dam is located in the heart of Wood Buffalo National Park a UNESCO World Heritage Site. 4 Tuesday July 7 2015 The Northern Journal is an independent newspaper covering news and events in the western Arctic and northern Alberta. 2013 CCNA BLUE RIBBON CANADIAN COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER AWARD 2013 C M C A AUDITED The Northern Journal is published weekly by Cascade Publishing Ltd. Printed at Star Press Inc. Wainwright AB. Publisher................................................................................. Don Jaque 867-872-3000 ext.21 donnorj.ca Editor.........................................................................Meagan Wohlberg 867-872-3000 ext.24 newsnorj.ca Reporter....................................................................... Dali Carmichael 867-872-3000 ext.25 reporternorj.ca Comptroller ..................................................... Dixie Penner 867-872-3000 ext.23 dixnorj.ca Advertising.............................. Heather Foubert Hay River 867-874-4106 adsnorj.ca Administration............................................Jeremy Turcotte 867-872-3000 ext.26 adminnorj.ca Production Manager ......................................Sandra Jaque 867-872-3000 ext.22 sandranorj.ca Graphics........................................................Paul Bannister 867-872-3000 ext.27 graphicsnorj.ca Letters to the Editor Policy The Northern Journal welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and include a phone number so the author can be veried. Names will be withheld on request in special circumstances where the reasons are determined to be valid. The Journal reserves the right to edit letters for length libel clarity and taste. Opinions expressed in letters and columns are not necessarily those of the publisher or editor. Advertising Deadlines Display ad deadline is Thursday at 400 p.m. Classied ad deadline is Thursday at 500 p.m. Email adsnorj.ca Subscription Rates Prices include GST. 47.25 in Fort Smith 52.50 elsewhere in Canada 105 in the USA overseas 164.30. EDITORIAL COLUMN Time is now for a cleaner greener future Given that the future of the planet may hang in the balance it would be a good idea to make changes as quickly as possible. Most countries except Canada are doing their part to move the worlds economy away from dependence on fossil fuels and many innovative individuals are working on new ways to source energy but it will take the impetus of all of us and how we use energy in our day to day lives if the world is to truly move to a green economy. The worlds rst zero-emission double- decker bus arrives in London England this year a forerunner of a new electric-powered eet of red British icons of public transpor- tation. The announcement was made at the Clean Bus Summit last week where 24 cit- ies around the world committed to putting ultra-low emission buses on the road. Utilities in Texas are now selling solar power at near or even under five cents a kilowatt hour. One of them energy giant Sun Edison is so optimistic there are prof- its to be made at those low rates they are investing billions of dollars in India and China on solar panel manufacturing. As new materials and technologies emerge the cost of solar panels and the energy they generate continues to drop rapidly to the point where new hydro power plants that face escalating construction costs can no longer compete. Meanwhile the solar-powered single-pilot airplane dubbed Solar IMPULSE is making aviation and renewable energy history as it circumnavigates the globe running only on energy from the sun. It ew 4000-miles from Japan to Hawaii last week as part of its round the world expedition without using fossil fuels. Those are examples at the leading edge. How fast will the world shift from using fos- sil fuels Change on such a scale is typically slow and because so many people make so much money off sourcing and supplying fos- sil fuels opposition to such change is a huge impediment to any move to a new economy. Canada dependent as it is economically on the export of fossil fuels is one of those with inuence trying to stop or at least delay any move away from it. If the gases that are the byproduct of fos- sil fuels are causing climate change how much time do we have before damage is irreversible Many people still feel climate change is a natural phenomenon and not caused by human activity. Theories of alternative causes abound including solar storms or a change in the axis of the earth. More and more sci- entists are coming on side in support of the thesis that climate change is caused by the release of gases from vehicles factories and power plants running on fossil fuels. Those gases collect in the atmosphere and cause a greenhouse effect warming the earth and changing weather patterns. Arguments that climate change does not exist have become muted as science con- firms what is more and more obvious that our planet is undergoing a dramatic trans- formation. With weather getting crazier all the time ordinary citizens are aware - and concerned. The results are fright- ening. What messed-up world will future generations face We have to take better care of the world that sustains us as we grow and evolve. Massive islands of plastic refuse oat in our oceans. Oilsands mining tears up the land and leaves massive toxic tailings ponds while it spews carcinogens into the atmo- sphere. Diesel trucks emitting noxious ex- haust proven harmful to human health are our main source of hauling goods. Two-cycle engines that power everything from lawn- mowers to chainsaws emit pollution. Those are but a few contributors to a way of life that is counter to intelligent living. All of them need to be replaced. That would be the case even if there were no climate change. Weaning the global economy off fossil fuels is the obvious solution. We have to change the way we think and make the transition. Given that the future of the planet may hang in the balance it would be a good idea to make changes as quickly as possible. Humanity has come a long way in the last 200 years and we have fossil fuels to thank for that. Energy derived from the earth has been a boon to development and progress. Now it is time to move on. The undertaking will be huge. It will also be exciting and a particular boon to the North where we so desperately need an alterna- tive to our costly inefcient diesel power plants. We all have to do our part to make the change happen as individuals and as a society. Our leaders have to be in the fore- front making the big decisions and invoking ways to encourage the new economy. Elec- tions are coming and we the people have the power to choose. Challenge candidates. Make sure they have a vision for a cleaner greener future. Tips for safety while enjoying activities on or around water By Cst. ELENORE STURKO Media Liason Royal Canadian Mounted Police G Division Yellowknife NT The RCMP in the Northwest Territories would like to remind the public about the importance of safety when enjoying recre- ation on or around the water this summer. With its abundance of lakes the North- west Territories is an excellent location for boating shing swimming and other water- based activities. There are risks associated with recreation on or around water drowning hypother- mia boating collisions or even getting lost. However by being aware and ensuring you are properly equipped these risks can be greatly reduced. Over the past week there have been three incidents where stranded boaters required the assistance of the RCMP and Canadian Coast Guard in Yellowknife and Hay River. Two of the three vessels required towing back to their dock while the third was able to reach its dock under escort. All of these incidents were related to mechanical issues. No injuries were reported. These incidents serve as a reminder for the public to be prepared for an emergency on the water. Have a plan and practice water safety and encourage others to do the same. The following are tips for enjoying a safe boating season Be familiar with the operation of your vessel and ensure it is in proper working condition prior to heading out on the water. Have a spare battery or a means to recharge your boat battery and a backup motor. Have everyone wear a lifejacket or personal otation device. Familiarizeyourselfwiththeareainwhichyou will be traveling learn about local hazards. Familiarize yourself with marine navigation. Check the marine forecast before heading out and monitor the weather for changes. Ensure that you have the appropriate re- quired safety equipment for your vessel a bailer paddles a whistle or horn and a throw rope. Carry a satellite phone marine radio or other means of communication. Inform someone of your travel plans where you are going and when you plan to return. Carry emergency supplies and learn sur- vival skills. This important message is part of the Northwest Territories RCMPs commitment to public safety. PhotoDaliCarmichael Marilyn Barnes president of the Hay River Beautication Committee hands out baby birch and spruce to customers visiting the Fishermans Wharf farmers market on June 25. Barnes and her partners aim to get potential horticulturists out of their homes and into their gardens in a community effort to make the town a beautiful place. Tuesday July 7 2015 5 COLUMNS 15 Years Ago... NWT athlete killed in bear attack The NWT and Canada lost a promising young ath- lete on the Canada Day weekend in what appears to be a black bear attack. Mary Beth Miller from Yellowknife was killed July 2 while running on a training path near Quebec City. She was said to be among the top 10 female biathletes in Canada. Issue July 4 2000 20 Years Ago... Deh Cho Annual General Assembly The Deh Cho First Nations will be holding their An- nual General Assembly in Kakisa July 10-15. Drum dances exploratory discussions womens gatherings reports of ongoing initiatives and the Deh Cho First Na- tions Constitutional Forum are going to be some of the activities at the Assembly. Issue July 5 1995 30 Years Ago... Zinc reduction takes jobs Some workers at Pine Point Mines will lose their jobs due to a reduction in zinc concentrate production says mine general manager Mike Mandry. Mandry says the reduction spread over the second half of 1985 and into 1986 will denitely have an impact on the work payroll. Issue July 4 1985 ARCHIVES Northern Journal 2015 Join us online Like Northern Journal on Facebook and get the weekly news delivered to your feed FACEBOOK FEEDBACK Fireghting operations near Sandy Lake in the South Slave were brought to a halt last week after crews and helicopters showed up to a fuel cache to nd all four drums of Jet-A fuel had been stolen. Fire operations grind to halt after helicopter fuel stolen Eileen Norman I sure hope the police are investigating this. I would love to see these idiots identied and charged. Ron Gwynne Tough world out there. I heard the same for drug dealers in Co- lumbia who had to guard the fuel for their drug planes usually it was swapped for water...before they got there and tried to take off. But re ghting fuel being stolen sounds Conservative to me... By DAWN KOSTELNIK Hunters return to camp with four seals. The seals are alreadyrigidinthecoldofthe early evening the heat of the sunrunsquicklyawayintothe dusk.Stiffsealsarestuckinto thesnowandbecomeanchors forthetent.Insidethetentwe have laid down caribou hides with the hair on the ice then welayermorehidesontopwith thehairfacingup. Caribouhair is hollow this provides insu- lation from the solid ice oor beneath us. For heat we have the primus Coleman stove withsevenofuscrammedinto the small space it is still cool enoughtoseeyourbreathbut warmenoughtotakeyouritigi parkie off. We are left to our own amusement which turns into multiple games of cards and cats cradle. It seems that the adults have been brewing theirownsourceofentertain- mentraisinssugaryeastand maybe a potato is the usual bouquet of this drink in the North.Ithasbeendetermined thatinordertoenjoythejuice of their labour it is better to leave town rather than risk having the brew pot stolen. Laughing erupts from the tent beside us as night nally decides to brush a black wing over the skies. My friends sis- ter a much younger girl pos- sibly eight years old is with the adults. How come Sally is drinking homebrew with them I ask. She likes it is the answer. What do you say to that We return to the card game. Morning arrives with the smellofboilingwillowptarmi- gan. This is not a good thing. Heads peek out from under bigvestarsleepingbags.The bottom sheet on our bed is a rawtannedcaribouhidehair is everywhere. I drowsily lift my head trying not to swal- low the hair that has lled my mouth though the night. On the Coleman stove which is in the centre of the tent a big pot is lled with whole ptar- migan no feathers. Thepothascometoarolling boilandtheheadsoftheptar- miganbobwiththeboil. Eyes bulgingfromtinyheadsarein direct line of sight with mine and only inches away. Open beaks appear to gasp Save me save me. Ptarmigan that have been eating willow buds forweekssmellpowerfullyacid andwild. Thiswillbebreakfast. ImthenewkidontheblockI likeptarmiganbuthavenever hadthemcookedquitelikethis. No one has a problem with my ignorance everyone is smiling big smiles and show- ing me the delicate method of poking out the grouse eyes as hors doeuvres and biting the beakandsuckingoutthecon- trol panel. In deference to my hostsIsuggest that they have myshareofeyesandcranium. Chewing on the tough stringy bird with innards intact is as muchasIcandealwithonthis maiden voyage. For dinner the evening be- fore we had frozen raw Arctic char and frozen raw caribou base line sushi...condiment of saltthatsitnowasabi. Ifound both to be good I did not like the sensation of big chunks of slightly thawed char so much andtriedtoswallowitquickly. This is fast food when there is no wood to build res to cook your food. There is the most wonderfulbannockandwefry Pilot Biscuits in canned butter andsmotherthemwithstraw- berry jam an Easter feast www.thewhitegirl.ca White Girl Easter in the Arctic How to get happy have a great attitude increase energy and be smarter By ANGELA SLADEN Who doesnt like the feel of the sun on their skin Espe- cially after a long cold win- ter. For those of us who live up in the North we particu- larlyenjoythesunandNEED the health benets that come fromspendingtimeinitsglo- rious heat. Research tells us that the majority of us spend almost 90 of our time inside our homes or ofces and 7 of our time in vehicles. This is a total of 97 of our life This is concerning because contaminants and pollutants are often ve times higher inside than outside. One way to help reduce the levels is to open a window on opposite sides of the room to allow a cross draft of fresh air. The optimal way to gain the health benets of the sun and fresh air though is to be outside soaking up all those wonderful rays which then convert to tools our bodies need to function at top speed. And if you can do this while weeding your garden all the better Here are just a few of the benets of spending time outsideenjoyingtheH-E-A-T H is for happy and healing Spendingtimeoutsideincreases happiness because of the vita- min D that is produced within the body as a result of being in thesun.VitaminDisknownto helpalleviatedepressionandthe winter blues. Have you noticed howmuchbetteryoufeelaftera littletimeoutsideandespecially inthesunThatisVitaminDin action.VitaminDisfatsoluble it accumulates in your fat cells and you can build up a reserve thatwilllastuptothreemonths. Afterthatitsgoneanditneeds to be replenished. Many peo- ple choose to take a Vitamin D supplementorgoonatriptothe beach.Oneofthebestcuresfor SADorseasonalaffectivedis- orderisthesun. Spending time outside is also very healing for the mind body and emotions. Youhavelesspainsleepbetter and maintain better function throughout the day. Studies show that people who spent time outside after surgery re- quired 22 less pain medica- tion than those who didnt. E is for energy and self-es- teem. Spending time outside helpsincreaseyourenergyeven ifyouareexpendingmoreen- ergy. This is why it is better to exerciseoutsidethaninsideif possible.Insteadofwalkingon atreadmilltakeawalkinthe woodsorworkinyourgarden. We all know how stress tires us. Getting outside can not only help get rid of stress it will give you energy to con- tinue your day. It is hard to feel good about yourself when you are tired stressed cant focus and feel sad. Watch and feel your self- esteemshootupafteronlyve minutesoutside Ifyouworkin an ofce make it a goal to get outside for ve minutes every chanceyoucan. Itwillmakeall thedifferenceIpromiseyou. AisforattitudeandADHD. Being outside is known to perk up your mood in as little as 10 minutes Again this is Vitamin D in action in com- bination with the fresh air and sounds of nature which are soothing and comforting. Severalmedicalauthorities haveanothernameforADHD NDD nature decit disorder. ChildrenandadultswithADD or ADHD have shown great improvement in their ability tofocusandconcentratewhen they spend signicantly more timeoutside.ThisbeatsRitalin oranyotherdruganditsfree and totally natural T is for thoughtfulness and therapy.Ifyouareworkingon a project or need a great idea andarehavingtroublestirring one up get outside and get in- spired Studies have shown that walking outside can in- creasecreativitybyover80 Forgetthecoffeebringonthe sunshine Finallyeveryonceinawhile we all need a little self-ther- apy a little self-healing and a little self-love. There is no better therapy for body soul andspiritthanspendingtime inthedirttreesgrasswater eldairnatureormountains. Perform a little self-therapy before anything else. Angela Sladen is a nutri- tionistandentrepreneurfrom Edmonton. She is a member of the Tahltan First Nation in Northern British Columbia. Patricia Sepp I hope they nd these in- dividuals. Lets shame them. Joy Stewart R U kidding me - for SHAME George Lessard Good journalism ter- rible story. Aboriginal education prioritized at Canadian ministers meetings 6 Tuesday July 7 2015 EDUCATION ABORIGINAL Seeking Public Comment on NWT Species at Risk Proposals The Government of the Northwest Territories is looking for your input on the following proposed actions under the NWT Species at Risk program Proposed addition to the NWT List of Species at Risk Western Toad as Threatened Comments due by July 20 2015 Proposed Draft Recovery Strategies NWT Boreal Caribou Recovery Strategy Comments due by July 20 2015 NWT Hairy Braya Recovery Strategy Comments due by August 10 2015 For more information on these proposals or copies of the recovery strategies visit the NWT Species at Risk website at www.nwtspeciesatrisk.ca or contact your local Environment and Natural Resources Office. Send your comments to Lynda Yonge Director Wildlife Environment and Natural Resources Government of the Northwest Territories Box 1320 Yellowknife NT X1A 2L9 Phone 867 873-7588 Fax 867 873-0293 Email saragov.nt.ca cascade graphics New solutions. Book design Brochures posters Business stationery Greeting cards Logo design Marketing solutions Photography Promo material Signs banners Stickers magnets Call us at 867.872.3000 Email us at graphicsnorj.ca or designnorj.ca or simply drop-in at 207 McDougal Rd Fort Smith NT By DALI CARMICHAEL Yellowknife played host to two Council of Ministers of Education Canada CMEC meetings last week where Aboriginal education was singled out as a top prior- ity for educators and policy developers from across the country. Two days of conferences started on June 29 with a dedicated Aboriginal Edu- cators Symposium followed the next day by CMECs 104th annual general meet- ing where recommenda- tions from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission TRC were at the forefront of discussions. We have invited Aborig- inal educators and elders from across Canada to tell us how to encourage more Aboriginal people to pur- sue a teaching career said NWT Education Culture and Employment Minister Jackson Lafferty. We are also asking what we can do to ensure that seasoned Ab- original educators remain in the profession. The meetings provided an opportunity for about 75 delegates to network and share ideas on both policy development initiatives and on-the-ground practical methods of improving edu- cation for students and for closing the gap between indigenous and non-indig- enous youth as many pre- senters commented. At last years AGM Laf- ferty and his Alberta coun- terpart were tasked with developing CMECs Aborig- inal Education Plan. At the meetings they presented their findings organized into four key areas of devel- opment the rst of which is supporting the development of more Aboriginal teachers Lafferty said. Numerous studies includ- ing a 2010 research report by Canadian Teachers Fed- eration have found that not only do Aboriginal teachers enjoy providing education that focuses on indigenous histories and frames peoples in a positive light but also better integrate Aboriginal teachings and perspectives in a variety of subject matter. Aboriginal educators are a positive inuence on their students and will play a piv- otal role in reducing the aca- demic achievement gap be- tween Aboriginal and non- Aboriginal students Laf- ferty said. To ensure more Aboriginal people become educators we needed to listen closely to and learn from the true experts on this topic Aboriginal teachers themselves. The second priority is to promote understanding of the history and legacy of res- idential schools in all K-12 education systems across the country. For several years high schools in the NWT and Nunavut have delivered curricula based on the his- tory and legacy of residen- tial schools to Grade 10 stu- dents. At the CMEC meet- ings the Northern educa- tors took the opportunity to share that curriculum with the intent of having it become a model for other regions to develop their own residential school cur- riculums. They were joined by TRC commissioners Dr. Marie Wilson and Wilton Littlechild who presented to delegates sharing insights from the commissions final report. Some of those recommen- dations include eliminating the discrepancy in federal education funding for First Nations children being ed- ucated on and off reserves publishing annual reports looking at the funding and outcomes for schools on and offreservesdraftingnewAb- original education legislation withthefullparticipationand informed consent of Aborigi- nal peoples and encouraging provincialandAboriginalgov- ernments to develop cultur- ally appropriate early child- hood education programs for Aboriginal families. The recommendations tie into a third priority which is to ensure teachers - both in- digenousandnon-indigenous - understand the intergener- ational legacy of residential schools on families. In 2016 the Alberta and NWT ministers are set to lead the development of teaching resources that will delve into the history and legacy of residential schools for both Bachelor of Educa- tion students and pre-service teaching programs. In addi- tiontheywillsetupanonline resource to share resources between jurisdictions to be used by teachers from all backgrounds. The nal key priority for CMEC will be sharing best practices on improving indig- enous education throughout the country. In addition to the exchange of ideas CMEC members put forward a draft renewed in- tergovernmental agreement that will allow representa- tives from one of the three territories to chair the or- ganization for the rst time in its history. The initiative led by the NWT clears the pathway for more Northern people to lead the charge in improving Canadas educa- tion system. This was not possible in the past and marks an im- portant step in the evolution of the territories role in the Canadian federation Laf- ferty said. Elders and delegates at the CMEC Aboriginal Educators Symposium open with a feeding the re ceremony on June 29. Food trucks hit NWT roads in time for the summer Tuesday July 7 2015 7 INDUSTRY SMALL BUSINESS By DALI CARMICHAEL With the summer season in full swing Northerners are soaking up the long hours Sousanh Chanthalangsy is the owner of One of a Thai a Yellowknife food truck dedicated to serving up authentic Thai cui- sine. Chanthalangsys culinary inspiration comes from her mother who is also a chef on the truck. Growing up she would always cater birthday parties or just family functions she said. I would watch her cook or help her out and I told her one day we are going to show off your cooking And now every dish we make or put together its the same Robin Wasicuna known for his stint on the competitive cooking show Chopped Canada runs the Wise Guy Foods truck one of the biggest names in Yellowknife. In the process of opening his new station- ary restaurant Wasicuna prides himself on serving quality comfort foods with a North- ern flair year-round. However when working out of his truck his specialty is burgers and sandwiches. Everything has a little twist on it as one wouldexpectfrommehesaid.Oursignature Daniel Probst and his wife Beate run Dan- iels Swiss Baking Hay Rivers home for fresh pastries and light lunches. For the past two years the duo has set themselves up at the communitys weekly Fishermans Wharf market but recently started parking their truck in the garden centre of the Super A grocery store. The response from the community was overwhelming and encouraging said Daniel Fishermans Wharf Fish and Chips Hay River While technically not a food truck the fish and chips pop-up stand hosted at the Fishermans Wharf in Hay River is not a meal to be missed. These cooks serve up flaky fillets of whitefish reeled in fresh from Great Slave Lake. The fish is then lightly breaded fried and plated on a bed of crunchy french fries with side of tartar sauce ketchup and lemon. Eat this hearty meal right next to the river at the picnic tables set up in the marketplace. Dont forget the market runs from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturdays in the summer make it a day and check out the vendors before treating yourself to this clas- sic meal. Curbside Treats and Eats Yellowknife Murray Jones is the owner and operator of the year- old Curbside Treats and Eats Truck which can be found parked along Franklin Ave. in Yellowknife during the week or out at Fred Henne Park near Long Lake on the weekends. There is a lot of variety on the menu but Jones top sell- ers are definitely his bannock balls and fresh-squeezed lemonade. He also hosts a Fish Taco Friday where he serves up fresh whitefish from Great Slave Lake with some South American heat. We just like to have good fun foods Jones said not- ing that a lot of his recipes are the result of suggestions from his family members. Street Treats Fort Smith The Street Treats food truck is run by Fort Smith entre- preneur Denise Yuhas. A busy businesswoman Yuhas is serious about delivering fresh delicious food to her cus- tomers sourcing her ingredients locally whenever possible. Hertarthomemadelemonatordrinkisnottobemissed and neither is her menus newest item fried whitefish har- vestedfromGreatSlaveLakeservedwithfresh-cutfrenchfries. We never just want to have one thing Yuhas said. For the first time this year Yuhas will be setting up her stand every Thursday next to the Rusty Raven caf start- ing July 16. She also plans on running some more regular weekend hours either parked out of her lot on McDougal Rd. or out and about around town. After years of being told she should be sell- ing her savoury foods Mitu Nahar finally caved and opened the Saffron food truck this summer bringing authentic Indian food to the streets of Yellowknife. The truck has only been open for about a week but so far the most popular dish has been Nahars butter chicken. She serves it up with a side of rice and also offers warm naan samosas and even some soups. PhotocourtesyofOneofaThai PhotoVisualIndexPhotography PhotocourtesyofDanielsSwissBaking PhotocourtesyofSaffron of sunlight as much as they can. While out- doors why not hit the streets and try out some of the best food the NWT has to offer To help you on your culinary road trip the Northern Journal has rounded up some of the top food trucks North of 60. as when I was younger. Its authentic and comfort food. One of a Thais signature dish and one of the most popular on the menu is their Combo 1 which comes with pad thai noodles a co- conut curry chicken skewer and two spring rolls either pork or shrimp. With a new truck on the road Chanthalangsy looks forward to cruising around the city to deliver her delec- table Asian cuisine. Youll most likely find the mother-daughterduoparkedoutsideofVisual Effects on the corner of 48th St. and 49th Ave. One of a Thai - Yellowknife burger is called the Numbnuts. It has peanut butter bacon jam cheese and burger sauce. All our patties are hand formed 100 per cent ground chuck roast and almost all our condi- ments and toppings are made from scratch as well as our buns. Rain or shine youll find Wasicuna and his crew of wise guys and gals parked near the Northern Frontier Visitors Centre in Yellowknife. Wise Guy Foods - Yellowknife who trained as a pastry chef in Switzerland. My inspiration for food is based on the cus- tomers what they might like and what I might like. I love good food Daniel said his most popular menu items are his Swiss-style doughnuts and turnovers filled with almond paste or sour cream cus- tard. But if its a hearty lunch youre look- ing for make sure to try out the pretzel- bun hot dogs. Daniels Swiss Baking - Hay River Until Saffron finds its home customers might have to do some searching around downtown Yellowknife to find those unique Eastern flavours. I just started so I go wherever there is space Nahar said. Its hard to get parking so I just try to get the best spots. Saffron - Yellowknife Fromclassicbarbecuedishesthebestfillets of fish and the most aromatic Eastern cuisine thesemobilechefswillhelpquashany cravings. 8 Tuesday July 7 2015 POLITICS LABOUR Town hiring replacement workers as Hay River strike enters seventh month By MEAGAN WOHLBERG The Town of Hay River plans to bring on more replacement workers to ll the gaps in service caused by the ongoing municipal strike that enters its seventh month this week. Councilhasattemptedtoresolvethelabour dispute through negotiations however our efforts have constantly been rejected by the unionsaidHayRiverMayorAndrewCassidy. Council is still committed to ending the strike through the negotiation process but is now looking at longer-term service delivery. Approximately30workershavebeenonstrike sinceFeb.9duetoadisputeoverwageincreases. The town is now advertising for as-and- when contract workers to perform duties in administrative support nancial administra- tion support project management and rec- reation operation and maintenance services. UnionofNorthernWorkers1stvicepresident Gayla Thunstrom warned that bringing in re- placementworkerswillonlyexacerbateincreas- ing tensions in the community where conicts betweencontractworkersandpicketersrecently resulted in RCMP being called to assist. Replacement workers or scabs and con- tractors are not heroes brought in to save the day she said. Weve said that all along. Their use only serves to make a settlement more difcult to achieve and to create bitterness that will last long after the dispute. By hir- ing scabs it usually ends in lengthening the dispute in most cases. The union rejected the towns latest offer last month after taking it to the membership for a vote. The town had bumped its offer up to a 1.7 per cent annual wage increase over the life of the three-year collective agreement which expired December 2013. According to union ofcials two thirds of the employees rejected the offer calling for a fairer agreement on par with similar con- tracts recently signed by union employees in the Village of Fort Simpson and with the Fort Smith Housing Authority. Since then the town has dropped its offer back down to 1.55 per cent. The union is still asking for a 2.25-2.5 per cent increase over the three years. Thunstrom said the union wants to see the matter taken to an independent third party to decide as was requested earlier this year but rejected by town council. I really truly believe that the way to set- tle this dispute at this point in time is for the employer to accept the unions offer of bind- ing arbitration she said. Mining incentive program funds 12 exploration projects By MEAGAN WOHLBERG A dozen mining juniors and prospectors were given a leg up last week during the sec- ond round of the GNWTs recently introduced mining incentive program. Twelve gold and diamond exploration proj- ects in the North Slave and Sahtu regions re- ceived 400000 on June 30 in an attempt to boost exploration and possibly spark some discoveries. We know our territory is rich in minerals but we are still under-explored said Indus- try Tourism and Investment Minister David Ramsay. Prospecting maximizes the return on our investment through innovative and effective exploration. The majority of the projects funded are looking for gold or diamonds in the Slave Geo- logical Province but one owned by DEMCo L.P. - a Dene-owned mining company - is searching for silver iron oxide copper and gold near Great Bear Lake in the Sahtu. Companies that received funding include TerraX Minerals Inc. which is looking for gold in the Yellowknife area along with Panarc Resources Ltd. GGL Resources Corp. both of which are in search of a variety of base met- als. Proxima Diamonds Corp. and Canterra Minerals Corp. are on the hunt for diamonds. In the prospector program Dave Nicker- son Penelope Shaw Ken Baigent Nicolas Walker and Wayne Kendrik have all received funding to look for gold while Gary Jaeb is the sole prospector exploring for diamonds. The mining incentive program comes out of the territorys Mineral Development Strat- egy intended to promote and support explo- ration and mining work in the NWT. It was modelled after similar programs in other jurisdictions and is managed by the NWT Geological Survey. The annual budget for the program is 400000andgivesprospectorsupto15000 each. Companies are eligible to receive up to 100000 representing 50 per cent of eli- gible expenses. This is the second year of the program. In both years the GNWT indicated exploration companies and prospectors asked for more funding than was available. INDUSTRY MINING Companies and prospectors on the hunt for diamonds and gold in the NWT were given a funding boost by the territorial governments mining incentive program. PhotoDaveBrosha I really truly believe that the way to settle this dispute at this point in time is for the employer to accept the unions offer of binding arbitration. Gayla Thunstrom Union of Northern Workers YOUR source for Northern news 2011 National Award Winner 2011 Best All-Round in Canada 2012 Top Three Overall in Canada 2013 National Award Winner 2014 National Award Winner 2013 CCNA BLUE RIBBON CANADIAN COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER AWARD 2013 Find the Journal in these communities throughout the North By telling the stories of Northerners were making our communities stronger AKLAVIK NT ANZAC AB ATHABASCA AB ATIKAMEG AB BEHCHOKO NT BERWYN AB BROWNVALE AB BUCKINGHORSE RIVER BC CADOTTE LAKE AB CALLING LAKE AB CAMBRIDGE BAY NU CHARD JANVIER AB CHATEH ASSUMPTION AB CLEARWATER RIVER SK COLD LAKE AB COLVILLE LAKE NT CONKLIN AB DAWSON CITY YT DELINE NT DIXONVILLE AB DRIFTPILE AB DUFFIELD AB EAGLE PLAINS YT EDMONTON AB EKATI MINES NT ENILDA AB ENOCH AB ENTERPRISE NT FOND-DU-LAC SK FORT CHIPEWYAN AB FORT GOOD HOPE NT FORT LIARD NT FORT MACKAY AB FORT MCMURRAY AB FORT MCPHERSON NT FORT NELSON BC FORT PROVIDENCE NT FORT RELIANCE NT FORT RESOLUTION NT FORT SIMPSON NT FORT SMITH NT FORT ST. 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PAUL AB TOAD RIVER BC TROUT LAKE NT TSIIGEHTCHIC NT TUKTOYAKTUK NT TULITA NT ULUKHAKTOK NT URANIUM CITY SK VALLEYVIEW AB WABASCA DESMARAIS AB WEKWEETI NT WHATI NT WHITEHORSE YT WRIGLEY NT YELLOWKNIFE NT ZAMA CITY AB Tuesday July 7 2015 9 NORTHERNERS VETERANS Smiths Landing First Nation NWT Cree Language Program Fort Smith Mtis Council Northwestern Air Kaesers Northern Store NWT Power Corp. TDC Northern Journal Town of Fort Smith Fort Smith Justice Committee Freunds Building Supplies Smiths Landing TentGrounds Crew Smiths Landing Council Members Uncle Gabes Friendship Center NWT Womens Corrections River Ridge F.S. Mtis Council President Ken Hudson MLA M. Miltenberger Lorraine McDonald Destiny Martin Bev Heron Delbert Bourke Trent Heron George Kurszewski Chief Andrew Wanderingspirit Kyle Napier Carla Ulrich Tina McNeill Ethel Chalifoux Peter Paulette Victor Marie Henry Beaver Don Matthews Jr. Peter Daniels Richard Van Camp Jeremy Turcotte Ronnie Schaefer Annie Bourke Denise Yuhas Maggie Sikyea Julie Beaver Lida Blesse Violet Edgi Esther Gordon Emily Smith Lia Ruttan Cecilia Schaefer Eileen Beaver Ashley Stokes Linda Masson Mary Cardinal Leonard Cardinal Daryl Cardinal Ryan Beaver Raymond Beaver Freddy Beaulieu Simon Beaver Ervin Beaver Donald Beaver Joyce Courtoreille Teena Beaver Judy Bourke Colleen Eckert Lucy Tulugarjuk Mike Foster Linda Foster All the Judges Time Keepers Fort Smith officer awarded medal of bravery By DALI CARMICHAEL Two years ago while serving in Kabul Af- ghanistan Master Warrant Ofcer Stanley Mercredi disarmed his neighbour a fellow soldier who threatened to kill himself. Inthemilitarywerealwaysbeingtaughtto watch for signs of people in distress watching to see how their reactions are from one day to anothermakesurethattheyreonhesaid.It just happened to be that the guy who actually did this was living in the room next to mine. For his act of valour Mercredi - born in Inuvik and raised in Fort Smith - was hon- oured with a medal of bravery by Governor General David Johnston at a ceremony held in Rideau Hall in Ottawa on June 26. I was pretty shocked. I actually thought at that time about being humble having Ab- original roots I learned to be humble from my grandparents he said. The incident took place on Jan. 13 2013 when Mercredi noticed a military member fromanothercountryactingerraticallynearby. I went and rapped on the door he was very agitated and he wanted to be left alone Mer- credi said. He left the room then he came back and I heard screaming. I knocked on the door again and I asked him Are you O.K. The next few moments moved in slow mo- tion Mercredi said. He just looked at me then looked at his friend he said. Right behind him was his service pistol it was sitting in the holster. He started to reach for that and his room- mate wasnt fast enough he was only able to grab the holster. Decades of military training and instinct kicked in as Mercredi sprang into action. Afterhedrewhispistoltheguyspunaround. Ibelievedatthattimetherewasgoingtobedan- gernotjusttomyselfbuttoalltheothersoldiers that were around us which was several Cana- dians him and his roommate Mercredi said. I didnt have a choice because at that time the pistol was coming around in my direction. I had to run into the room tackle him and his roommate to the ground and twist the pistol out of his hand. I removed the pistol from the room and unloaded it then ran back in to secure the member until the police in Kabul came over. Mercredi later learned the soldier had re- ceived bad news from home which caused the member to act irrationally. A shift in military mental health Sincethe1990stheCanadianArmedForces CAF have put a renewed effort into offering suicide prevention and mental well-being ser- vices formilitary personnel and theirfamilies. Providing greater access to clinical and non-clinical interventions mental health education and suicide awareness information are only some of the measures being taken to address the matter according a document on suicide and suicide prevention in the CAF published by the federal government. Still incidents can happen. Between 2010 and 2014 CAF recorded ve suicides in fe- male regular force members and 68 males in the same time frame 16 of which took place within the last year. CAF continues to offer preventive initiatives with the intent of de- creasing these numbers. Hanging up his rucksack NolongertouringMercredinow lives about 150 km west of Ottawa by the military base in Petawawa Ontario. As of this November he will have served as a CAF member for 33 years with tours in Croatia Bosnia Kosovo Germany and two tours in Afghanistan. Looking back on his career every so often Mercredi will reflect on the events of Jan. 13 2013. I think when you look at situations like that it does have an effect on you because every time you think of something or you see something on TV you rethink the moment Mercredi said. You learn to live with it be- cause its part of being in the military. PhotoSgtRonaldDuchesneRideauHall Master Warrant Ofcer Stanley Mercredi left shakes hand with Governor General David Johnston after being awarded a medal of bravery in a ceremony held in Ottawa on June 26. 10 Tuesday July 7 2015 Fort Smith decorates vol By DALI CARMICHAEL Smoky conditions around the South Slave didnt stop revelers from donning their red and whites and enjoying Fort Smiths Canada Day festivities last week. In addition to enjoying the towns annual pa- radeandwhiteshfrysomeofthecommunitys most dedicated volunteers were awarded for their efforts in making Fort Smith a wonderful place to live. Lifetime achievement award Richard and Barbara Mercredi were called to the Canada Day stage set up in Riverside ParktoacceptthetownsLifetimeAchievement Award where Mayor Brad Brake thanked the couple for hosting the annual Fort Smith sh- ing derby by their cabin on Jacksh Lake over the last 25 years. The beloved tradition not only provides win- tertimeanglerswithafunweekendoficeshing butservesasafriendlyremindertoresidentsthat winter is almost over and spring is on its way. We were surprised and certainly appreci- ated the award and that people were thinking about us Richard said. We werent expect- ing to get anything its just something we do for the community. The duo decided to pass the organization of the event on to a new generation of shers this year but said they will be happy to assist who- ever picks up the gig. Its a lot of hard work you just have to get yourteamorganizedRichardsaidnotingthat he and Barb usually start preparations for the March event in January. Theres lots of things to keep track of and plan like the food and the advertising letters for the sponsors - theres a whole pile of stuff that has to be done. I made a list for whoever is willing to step up were will- ing to help them out too. Elder of the year Cathy Lepine otherwise known as Gigi was named as the 2015 elder of the year. In addition to feeding the community out of her cafe Lepine is an active volunteer. Each year she gives her all to Fort Smiths Relay for Life event a fundraiser for the Canadian Cancer Society the town holds held every other year. ARTS CULTURE CANADA DAY Caden Dalby shows off his patriotic spirit.Fort Smith Mayor Brad Brake left with 2015 Paul Currie volunteer of the year recipient Jessica Cox and Thebacha MLA Michael Miltenberger. Wood Buffalo National Parks nature theme decoration contest in the government institu Clarie Loutit came prepared to collect candy and other treats during the parade. Smiths Landing First Nations charming river scene won them the top prize in the oat contest for the organization category. Amy Paziuk left Riley Venema and Kalysta Benwell get decked out in their best red and whites for the Canada Day parade. Tuesday July 7 2015 11 lunteers on Canada Day Im an eight-year survivor so anything they do I try to get involved with to show people that there is hope Lepine said. Theres a lot of people that arent going to make it but you just have to hope for them that they will. I have some friends who have cancer and it bothers me because I survived. Not one to dwell on the negative Lepine said she is grateful for the award. Its about time I got recognized Lepine laughed noting she has lived in the commu- nity for almost 50 years. I thank whoever sponsored me. Paul Currie volunteer of the year The 2015 volunteer of the year went to Jes- sicaCox a woman always ready to lend a hand. Most notably Cox is an athlete who shares her love of sport in numerous capacities in addi- tion to chairing Fort Smiths recreation advi- sory board Cox was a key player in the South Slaves successful bid for the 2018 Arctic Win- ter Games. A lover of Canadas national game Cox plays womens hockey and regularly volunteers as a hockey and skating coach for the towns youth. ThisyearshetookherpassiontoPrinceGeorge B.C.whereshecoachedtheNWTsCanadaWin- terGamesgirlsteamduringtheirtournament. The award is handed out in memory of the late Paul Currie. Citizen of the year Adedicatedvolunteerreghterregularevent organizer and self-proclaimed Fort Smith ad- vocate Shari Olsen was named the towns out- standing citizen of the year. Born and raised in Smith Olsen has had her hand in helping with endless activities for her fellow citizens includingthebiannualRelayforLifefundraiser. LikeCoxOlsenhasastrongloveofsportand enjoyscoachingyouthinavarietyofsports.Last year she participated in the Canada Winter Games as mission staff for Team NWT. Olsen isalsoontheFortSmithplanningboardforthe upcoming 2018 Arctic Winter Games. I really love this town and am proud to be a part of it. I will do what I can to make every- one love it as well she said. And thanks for the nomination PhotosPaulBannisterDaliCarmichael Madeleine Buckley rolls into the parade on the Mtis oat. Rebeckah Bird takes a unique approach to wearing her countrys colours with pride. Ryann Williams watches the Canada Day parade roll by with dad Mike Pickles. e takes second place in the Fort Smith oat utions category. Richard and Barbara Mercredi are awarded a lifetime achievement award. For the last 25 years the couple has voluntarily hosted the towns shing derby near their cabin on Jacksh Lake. The rec centre lifeguards arm themselves with water guns as they march alongside their oat which won third place in the government institutions category. 12 Tuesday July 7 2015 yellowknife chrysler .jeep .dodge .ram A Auto dealership YELLOWKNIFE CHRYSLER 340 Old Airport Road Yellowknife NWT X1A 3T3 Phone 867 873-4222 Fax 867 873-2029 YELLOWKNIFE CHRYSLERYELLOWKNIFE CHRYSLERYELLOWKNIFE CHRYSLER THE TOY STORETHE TOY STORETHE TOY STORE FOR GROWN UPSFOR GROWN UPSFOR GROWN UPS 2015ram 1500STARTING AT 29398 0 FINANCING FOR 72 MONTHS Wildcat TrailsSTARTING AT 11995 ARCTIC CAT QUADSSTARTING AT 3995 Lowes Pontoon S230 BoatsNOW ONLY 159 BI-WEEKLY Lowes fish Ski 1810 BoatsAS LOW AS 159 BI-WEEKLY COUGAR TRAILERS by KEystone AS LOW AS 139 BI-WEEKLY We deliver to your doorWe will fly you in 2015JEEP CHEROKEESTARTING AT 26995 0 FINANCING FOR 72 MONTHS 2015 Tuesday July 7 2015 13 ARTS CULTURE FESTIVALS Hay Days rocks through the smoke and fires PhotosScottClouthier Husband and wife duo Veronica and Dave Johnny of The Johnnys perform as VJDJ at the Doghouse Sports Bar in Hay River on Friday night. Danielle Schnyder spins yarn by hand. Schnyder was one of many artisans who sold their wares at the Hay River beach on Saturday afternoon during Hay Days. Hay River band Tour De Mac draws a crowd of dancers on Saturday evening. Shane Daniels and The Usual Suspects perform on stage at the Hay River beach on Saturday night. Toronto-based rock band Sun K performs at the Hay River beach on Saturday night. The band made the trip north for Hay Days as part of their ongoing tour of western Canada. Despite a week of threatened evacuation due to forest fires and a persistent haze of local smoke the weather cooperated with organizers of the Hay Days Festival last weekend. 14 Tuesday July 7 2015 The deadline for fall applications is July 15th Late applications are accepted but payment is not guaranteed for the start date of fall classes. www.nwtsfa.gov.nt.ca Student Financial Assistance NOW ONLINE www.facebook.comnwtsfa Like us on Facebook for updates reminders tips and to APPLY ONLINE APPLY ONLINE ase leave a message at 872-5543 for details. ESCLEAN NORTHERN SALES LTD. Ph 867 875-5100 Fax 867 875-5155 on long medium er - female on is a very loving and tiful cat. She is spayed s up-to-date with all hots.If you think you a home for a Avalon e call the shelter at 5543. Please leave a message at 872-5543 for details. WESCLEAN NORTHERN SALES LTD. Ph 867 875-5100 Fax 867 875-5155 E-mail infowescleannwt.com web www.wescleannwt.com Avalon Cat Hair - long Size - medium Gender - female Avalon is a very loving and beautiful cat. She is spayed and is up-to-date with all her shots.If you think you have a home for a Avalon please call the shelter at 872-5543. s eave a message at 872-5543 for details. CLEAN NORTHERN SALES LTD. g dium emale a very loving and cat. She is spayed to-date with all If you think you me for a Avalon l the shelter at Please leave a message at 872-5543 for details. WESCLEAN NORTHERN SALES LTD. Ph 867 875-5100 Fax 867 875-5155 E-mail infowescleannwt.com web www.wescleannwt.com Avalon Cat Hair - long Size - medium Gender - female Avalon is a very loving and beautiful cat. She is spayed and is up-to-date with all her shots.If you think you have a home for a Avalon please call the shelter at 872-5543. Please leave a message at 872-5543 for details. WESCLEAN NORTHERN SALES LTD. Ph 867 875-5100 Fax 867 875-5155 E-mail infowescleannwt.com web www.wescleannwt.com Avalon Cat Hair - long Size - medium Gender - female Avalon is a very loving and beautiful cat. She is spayed and is up-to-date with all her shots.If you think you have a home for a Avalon please call the shelter at 872-5543. lon c long hair ew home eutered with routine shots ned ovely girl who is She loves being just about any lon will make a to any family. Please leave a message at 872-5543 for details. WESCLEAN NORTHERN SALES LTD. Ph 867 875-5100 Fax 867 875-5155 E-mail infowescleannwt.com web www.wescleannwt.com Avalon Cat Hair - long Size - medium Gender - female Avalon is a very loving and beautiful cat. She is spayed and is up-to-date with all her shots.If you think you have a home for a Avalon please call the shelter at 872-5543. Kitkat is soft and friendly and he needs a new home. So give him a break for goodness sake. Please stop by and make Kitkat your new pet. Neutered and house trained Up-to-date with routine shots Please leave a message at 872-5543 for details. Kitkat is soft and friendly and he needs a new Kitkat Male - Adult Looking for a new home PhotosMarilynMarshallPhotography Ryan Dragon hugs his grandmother Sharon Dragon. Olivia Sperry left embraces sister Elizabeth Sperry one of the JDSS graduates. Taylor Price takes time to embrace her grandmother Gidget Dean after the ceremony. The Schumann family gives their best wishes to graduate Levon. From left is dad Tracey brother Jordan Levon mom Louise and grandfather Wally Schumann Sr. Hats off to the Hay River high school graduates Diamond Jenness Secondary Schools graduating class of 2015 celebrates their convocation on June 25. EDUCATION GRADUATION Fort Chipewyan sends off Grade 12 graduates in style Tuesday July 7 2015 15 EDUCATION GRADUATION By DALI CARMICHAEL Fort Chipewyan high school graduates set the small Alberta town abuzz as residents celebrated their youths achievements with a convocation ceremony and a loving send-off from the Athabasca Delta Commu- nity School. Fourteengraduatescrossed the stage the evening of June 27 acknowledging their achievement in style with a 1920s Great Gatsby decor theme. We went all out in terms of decorations and food said teacher Bailey Campbell. The glitzy event came to- gether with the support of several organizations based inthesmallhamletincluding donations from the local re departmentandtheLakeAtha- basca Youth Council LAYC. Chippers a local restau- rant even served up 14 in- dividualized pizzas one for each grad. Unfortunately a recent death in the community de- layed the graduation awards ceremony. It will be held in- stead this coming September. Until then the graduates arelookingforwardtosetting off on their own paths some leadingthemoutoftheregion to study everything from the trades to media design while others plan to stick around the town on the edge of Lake Athabasca. Tasheena Campbell takes on the traditional graduation march with father David. PhotosBrianLepine High school graduates from Athabasca Delta Community School in Fort Chipewyan cheer after receiving their diplomas. ADCS principal Kerri Ceretzke hands graduate Bobbi Lepine her high school diploma. Cameisha Gladue left Kaisha Marcel and Bobbi Lepine let loose after their convocation ceremony. Say it in 25 words or less for only 3.50 Extra words are 20 centseach.Businessclassifieds are 10 for 30 words and 25 centsforeach additionalword. E-mail your advertising to adsnorj.ca or fax it to 872-2754 or call 872-3000 ext. 26 FOR SALE FIREWOOD. Cus- tom cut sizes - split green dry bagged. Wood Gasification Outdoor wood boilers. Delivery from Fort Smith to Hay River Yellowknife. Contact Dave at 867 872-3435 or cell 872-0229 or email dhehnnorthwestel. net. UFN FORT SMITH CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING BLANKET CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Blanket advertising reaches all 122 weekly newspapers in Alberta and the NWT with a combined circulation of over a million readers. Call our Northern Journal sales desk at 867-872-3000ex.26fordetails. COMMUNITY TRADING POST If you operate a business and need affordable advertising call the Northern Journal. Find out how to have your business listed in our Service Directory. Call 867 872-3000 or email adsnorj.ca. Northern Journal Directory Get your name out there 16 Tuesday July 7 2015 Home Heating Oil For on-time or anytime delivery...call 100 Locally owned and operated 1 Breynat Street Fort Smith NT 872-4567 Petroleum Whispering Pines Cottages Serving you with 50 years experience Please Contact Sandra Robichaud PhoneFax 867 872-2906 - Cell 867 621-0254 85 Pine Crescent P.O. Box 300 Fort Smith NT X0E 0P0 sandralee.robichaudgmail.com Safe Travels Enjoy Private clean comfortable year round accommodations with Free WiFi and HD Relax with our jacuzzi tub fireplace BBQ yard dishwasher great parking and plug ins Affordable Rates daily weekly monthly stays available. 4 private units. 1 2 3 and 4 bedrooms to choose from. www.whisperingpinescottages.ca 867-765-2020 salescascom.ca 116 Nahanni Dr. Yellowknife NT X1A 2R1 www.cascom.ca Please contact us for information on how we can help make your project a success Providing connectivity - telephone and internet - solutions for industry in remote locations. SERVICE DIRECTORY EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY TITLE TECHNICAL SUPPORT ANALYST Location Corner of Highways 3 and 4 Yellowknife NT X1A 2P7 Reporting to the Director Information Technology the Technical Support Analyst provides effective and timely operational and technical support to computer users concerning system applications hardware and software. They also contribute to the efficient allocation of computer hardware and software resources develops and maintains business applications and ensures the reliability and sustainability of information and communication resources through system administration responsibilities. Education Diploma in Computer Science from a recognized university or college institution. ITIL certification encouraged. Qualifications Good project management and system development experience applicable to information system deployments. Excellent communication interpersonal customer service and problem solving skills in order to listen to train and assist users in identifying needs and resolvingproblems.Excellentanalyticalhardware and software troubleshooting skills to address problems presented by users. Over 10 years of IT systems and technical support experience related to business and systems applications tele- communications and minicomputers preferred. Salary and Benefits Salary range is 43.34 to 52.67 per hour plus location and accommodation allowances of approximately 8592 per annum. This is a full-time permanent position. We offer a comprehensive benefits package which includes health and dental benefits long-term disability life insurance paid sick days and a defined pension plan. Please send rsums to Human Resources Northwest Territories Power Corporation 4 Capital Drive Hay River NT X0E 1G2. Fax 867 874-5229. Email careersntpc.com. Competition 10-YK-15 Closing date Open until suitable candidate found. Affirmative Action Employer - Candidates must clearly identify eligibility status in order to receive priority consideration. We thank all those who apply and advise that only those selected for further consideration will be contacted. Empowering Communities Business Opportunities HIP OR KNEE Replacement ArthriticconditionsRestrictions in walkingdressing Disability Tax Credit. 2000 tax credit. 20000 refund. For Assistance 1-844-453-5372. GREATCANADIANDollarStore franchiseopportunitiesareavail- able in your area. Explore your future with a dollar store leader. Call today 1-877-388-0123 ext. 229 www.dollarstores.com. Career Training MEDICAL TRAINEES needed now Hospitals doctors of- ces need certied medical ofce administrative staff No experience needed We can get you trained Local job placement assistance available when training is completed. Call for program details 1-888- 627-0297. MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION- ISTS are in huge demand Train with Canadas top medical transcription school. Learn from home and work from home. Call today 1-800-466-1535 www. canscribe.com.infocanscribe. com. Employment Opportunities SEEKING A CAREER in the Community Newspaper busi- ness Post your resume for FREE rightwherethepublishers are looking. Visit awna.comfor- job-seekers. LPH Plumbing Heating Leduc requires Experienced Service Plumber as well as Sheet Metal Technician. Knowledgeable in residential. Competitive wages benets local work. Fax 780- 986-4983.Emailds_lphtelus. net. Phone 780-986-3388. GPRC Fairview Campus re- quiresaHeavyEquipmentTech- nician Instructor to commence August 15 2015. Caterpillar experience will be an asset. Visit our websiteathttpswww.gprc. ab.cacareers. MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION In-demand career Employers have work-at-home positions available.Getonlinetrainingyou need from an employer-trusted program. Visit CareerStep.ca MT or 1-855-768-3362 to start training for your work-at-home career today INTERIOR HEAVY EQUIP- MENT Operator School. In-the- seat training. No simulators. Real world tasks. Weekly start dates. Funding options. Weekly job board Sign up online iheschool.com. 1-866- 399-3853. Equipment For Sale A-CHEAP lowest prices steel shipping containers. Used 20 40 Seacans insulated 40 freezers DMG 2450. Want- ed Professional wood carver needed. 1-866-528-7108 www. rtccontainer.com. Feed and Seed HEATEDCANOLAbuyingGreen HeatedorSpringthrashedCano- la. 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Services ADVERTISE PROVINCE WIDE CLASSIFIEDS.Reachover1mil- lionreadersweekly.Only 269 GSTbasedon25wordsorless. Call now for details 1-800-282- 6903 ext. 228 www.awna.com. CRIMINAL RECORD Think Canadian pardon. U.S. travel waiver. Divorce Simple. Fast. Inexpensive. Debt recovery Alberta collection to 25000. Calgary 403-228-13001-800- 347-2540. EASY DIVORCE Free consul- tation call 1-800-320-2477 or check out httpcanadianlegal. orguncontested-divorce. CCA Award 1 Paralegal. A BBB Reputation. In business 20 years. Open Mon. - Sat. BANK SAID NO Bank on us EquityMortgagesforpurchases debtconsolidation foreclosures renovations. Bruisedcreditself- employedunemployedok.Dave Fitzpatrick www.albertalend- ing.ca. 587-437-8437 Belmor Mortgage. EMPLOYMENT TENDERS AND LEGAL NOTICES Tuesday July 7 2015 17 WWW.NORJ.CA 6.8103 in x 6.3125 in Community reporters and columnists wanted The Northern Journal is looking for community reporters and columnists. Tell us your stories. We want to know what is going on in your community. Send photos too. We pay We also want columns and commentary. If you have an area of expertise like hockey or volleyball birds or animals living on the land or maybe you just want to spin yarns about life in the North then we want you to write about it and send your work to us. We pay We are also looking for discerning Northerners who can write about perspectives on Northern life. Politics education colonialism culture the indus- trialization of Canadas Northern wilderness - what is your passion This is your chance to speak out Do it now send it to us. Advertising sales person needed in Yellowknife The Northern Journal is seeking someone who lives in Yellowknife and can work part time at ad- vertising sales. Past sales experience preferred. A combination of salary and commission would be negotiated. Cartoonist wanted for Northern themes The Northern Journal is seeking a cartoonist - someone who can draw images that entertain and incorporate social and political commentary. Please contact us editornorj.ca 18 Tuesday July 7 2015 EDUCATION POSTSECONDARY 926 MACKENZIE HIGHWAY HAY RIVER NT 867-874-2771 Toll Free 1-866-327-0717 www.monsterrec.com PLUS A great selection of outboard motors are on sale now OUFITTER SERIES 16 AND 18 FEET 926 MACKENZIE HIGHWAY HAY RIVER NT 867-874-2771 Toll Free 1-866-327-0717 www.monsterrec.com MONSTER NOW CARRIES FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION. Fishing Rods Tackle and a large selection of Hunting Knives also available DONT BE SASSEDBY A MOOSE By MEAGAN WOHLBERG Education got us into this mess and edu- cation will get us out of it stated Chief Wil- ton Littlechild a member of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission TRC during its closing ceremonies last month. Thats the spirit behind a new partnership intent on ensuring roughly 200000 Aborigi- nal children in Canada no longer go without the millions of dollars in free post-secondary education funding that most are currently missing out on. A new joint effort led by the J.W. McCon- nell Family Foundation and the National As- sociation of Friendship Centres is aiming to ensure no eligible youth goes without receiv- ing their Canada Learning Bond a 2000 no-strings-attached grant for children born after Dec. 31 2003 whose families receive the National Child Benet Supplement. When it comes to reaching Aboriginal peo- ple Friendship Centres are a great service de- livery mechanism said Jeffrey Cyr executive director of the National Association of Friend- ship Centres. We believe we can lend a great deal of value to this project by leveraging our national network to launch pilot projects in key Friendship Centres across Canada. The bond offered by the government of Canada gives low-income families a head start through the creation of a Registered Ed- ucation Savings Plan RESP. It begins with a 500 initial contribution followed by an ad- ditional 100 per year until the child turns 15 to a maximum of 2000 per child. The fund can be supplemented by other grants. According to the NWT Literacy Council only about nine per cent of eligible chil- dren in the NWT are receiving the money while 3000 kids are not. Thats three times below the already low national sta- tistics which indicate just 30 per cent of eligible families are accessing the program across Canada. Katie Randall youth and adult services coordinator for the NWT Literacy Council said the primary issue is awareness. A lot of children may be eligible for the Canada Learning Bond but their parents may not know about the program she said. Thats a barrier weve been trying to help people overcome by just making sure that the information is out there so that fami- lies know. But even when families are aware Randall said there are other logistical barriers that make getting the money tough for families in the North. RESPs must be set up in per- son at a nancial institution which can be difcult in the 27 NWT communities that dont have banks. With so many of our communities not having local bank branches thats a big barrier so people can really only set this up when theyre in Yellowknife or in one of the regional centres Randall said. AdditionallyinordertosetupanRESPboth thechildandparentneedtohaveaSocialInsur- anceNumberwhichrequiresabirthcerticate. In communities where there may not be a Service Canada ofce there might be a delay or an issue in getting the Social Insurance Numbers Randall said. The goal of the fund is to ensure educational outcomes for children are improved across Canada through early planning and savings for post-secondary. Recent studies show that only 45 per cent of high school students from low income families with no savings enroll in postsecondary and only seven per cent of those graduate. By contrast 72 per cent of students with even some savings enroll and 33 per cent graduate. Other partners in the initiative include non- prot organizations like SmartSAVER and the Martin Aboriginal Education Initiative as well as banks like BMO Meridian RBC Royal Bank Scotiabank TD and Vancity. Friendship Centres to ensure Aboriginal youth receive postsecondary education funding PhotocourtesyofAuroraCollege A new partnership between various banks NGOs and friendship centres aims to ensure eligible Aboriginal youth across Canada access their free postsecondary funding. Tuesday July 7 2015 19 ARTS CULTURE TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE UP TO 3000 OFFNEW NON-CURRENT ATVs AND SIDExSIDES 2 Aspen Road Hay River NT X0E 0P0 867 874-3224 Photos wanted for 2016 Fort Smith Pet Desk Calendar Filling up fast Get your pictures in soon Ifyouwouldliketohavephotosofyour petstakenarrangementscanbemade. Please call Chris at 872-5547. Becauseofthehighvolumeofrequests we are on a first come first in basis. Special consideration will be made for pets not in previous calendars. Please submit photos of living pets only. Thereisnofeetohavephotosinthecalendar. If you have any questions or need more information please call Chris at 872-5547 or email dewolfnorthwestel.net Deadline is August 31 This ad sponsored by the Northern Journal Appraised at 515000 asking 499000 Centrally located 6 car parking 3 complete private suites double lot Brand new furnace plumbing and electrical all new windows totally renovated hardwood throughout main floor All appliances and furniture are negotiable. Turn-key operation live in one suite and rent the others or operate a bed and breakfast. TRIPLEX FOR SALE 28 Cumming Avenue Fort Smith NT Email ruth_ rolfehotmail.com for enquiries or to set up a viewing. By MEAGAN WOHLBERG A new series of workshops for indigenous women in Fort Smith hopes to challenge co- lonial structures and empower women lead- ers through reclaiming traditional cultural knowledge. The set of four workshops scheduled to take place July 13-16 at Uncle Gabes Friend- ship Centre in Fort Smith is intended to weave a web of support and begin to break the hold of colonization on indigenous womens relationships and positions in the community. We hope that the project empowers our female participants to contemplate reflect on and possibly change their own ideas on their cultural economic politi- cal and social participation in their com- munities as matriarchs and as present andor future leaders said Veronica Johnny who is coordinating the work- shops along with Uncle Gabes youth co- ordinator Amy Harris. Basically we see ourselves as discuss- ing the rightful place of women as the ma- triarchs and leaders of our families and communities. The workshops will run from 6-10 p.m. each night beginning with a feast and fol- lowed by discussion reection and time for artistic expression whether it be through writing music or visual art. Johnny said the workshops will meld cul- tural knowledge with life skills development with the intent to spread healing and empow- erment by dealing with topics of grief and anxiety through drumming learning about the traditional full moon ceremony and other sacred teachings. I think a lot of healing can be accomplished through ceremony and I just wish there was more of it in Smith Johnny said. The whole point of the workshop is to change our thinking from the way that colo- nial structure has inuenced us. Part of the healing and the reconciliation has to do with getting back to old ways of thinking and part of those old ways of thinking is understanding womens place as a leader within our families and our communities she said. Though the workshops will prioritize in- digenous women and girls Johnny said any- one is welcome including men. She hopes to make it an annual event. For more information or to sign up con- tact Amy Harris at amyharrisychotmail. com. Space is limited. Funding for womens initiatives The Fort Smith workshop is being funded in part by a womens initiative grant from the territorial government. Ten 5000 grants were doled out to projects across the NWT including a wom- ens retreat program by the Yellowknives Dene First Nation yoga classes at Game- tis Jean Wetrade school capacity build- ing for the Norman Wells Metis Womens City Status of Women Council program- ming a Men for Change web portal and a healing workshop for youth affected by intergenerational trauma from residential schools to be led by the Healing Drum Society this fall. These projects are crucial at this time given our understanding of the impacts of residential schools and the ongoing system- atic devaluing of Aboriginal women said NWT Premier Bob McLeod. The Womens Initiatives Grants provide funding to com- munity organizations which is one piece of the GNWTs ongoing commitment to ad- dressing violence against women particu- larly Aboriginal women and girls. Womens traditional knowledge workshop aims to empower PhotoCarlaUlrich Musician Veronica Johnny hopes an upcoming traditional cultural knowledge workshop will empower women in Fort Smith through art and ceremony to reclaim their place as matriarchs. 20 Tuesday July 7 2015 DURING OUR BIGGEST EVENT OF THE YEAR BAILIE P. FORD EMPLOYEE MAX F. FORD EMPLOYEE 2015 F-150 XLT SUPERCREW Employee Price Adjustment 5390 Delivery Allowance 4000 SHARE OUR EMPLOYEE PRICE 38659 TOTAL PRICE ADJUSTMENTS 9390 FORD EMPLOYEE Platinum model shown TAKE A TEST DRIVE AT KINGLAND FORD TODAY. 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saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandfo Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Lorraine Pe Fleet Man Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales I3T643 Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager M Sal Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing DonneLeeJungkind Vehicle RV Sales LorrainePeterson Fleet Manager 2013 F150 SuperCab XLT 4x4 MSRP 40049 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2561 SALE PRICE 28238 I3T664 I3A08 2013 F150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 MSRP 43349 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2957 SALE PRICE 31142 0 down 278 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3T671 0 down 252 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months E-mail us to subscribe to our quarterly newsletter inquiry KINGLAND FORD SALES L 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867- E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.co Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Lorraine Peterson Fleet Manager Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales I3T643 Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Matt Mo Sales Le Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing DonneLeeJungkind Vehicle RV Sales LorrainePeterson Fleet Manager 2013 F150 SuperCab XLT 4x4 MSRP 40049 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2561 SALE PRICE 28238 2 I3T664 201 I3A08 2013 F150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 MSRP 43349 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2957 SALE PRICE 31142 0 down 278 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3T671 0 down 252 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months E-mail us to subscribe to our quarterly newsletter inquirykin THE 2013 HAVE TO Santas not the only one giving things away this December Check out these deals at Kingland in Hay River P to use or ma ev 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867- E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.com www.king Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales KINGLAND FORD SAL 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay Rive Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.king Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales I3T643 Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing DonneLeeJungkind Vehicle RV Sales LorrainePeterson Fleet Manager 2013 F150 SuperCab XLT 4x4 MSRP 40049 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2561 SALE PRICE 28238 I3T664 I3A08 2013 F150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 MSRP 43349 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2957 SALE PRICE 31142 0 down 278 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3T671 0 down 252 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months E-mail us to subscribe to our quarterly newsletter inq KINGLAND FORD SAL 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay Rive Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.kin Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales I3T643 Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing DonneLeeJungkind Vehicle RV Sales LorrainePeterson Fleet Manager 2013 F150 SuperCab XLT 4x4 MSRP 40049 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2561 SALE PRICE 28238 I3T664 I3A08 2013 F150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 MSRP 43349 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2957 SALE PRICE 31142 0 down 278 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3T671 0 down 252 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months E-mail us to subscribe to our quarterly newsletter inq KINGLAND FORD SAL 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay Rive Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.king Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales I3T643 Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing DonneLeeJungkind Vehicle RV Sales LorrainePeterson Fleet Manager 2013 F150 SuperCab XLT 4x4 MSRP 40049 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2561 SALE PRICE 28238 I3T664 I3A08 2013 F150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 MSRP 43349 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2957 SALE PRICE 31142 0 down 278 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3T671 0 down 252 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months E-mail us to subscribe to our quarterly newsletter inq KINGLAND FORD SALES 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.kingland Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Lorraine Fleet M Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales I3T643 Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager M S Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing DonneLeeJungkind Vehicle RV Sales LorrainePeterson Fleet Manager 2013 F150 SuperCab XLT 4x4 MSRP 40049 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2561 SALE PRICE 28238 I3T664 I3A08 2013 F150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 MSRP 43349 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2957 SALE PRICE 31142 0 down 278 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3T671 0 down 252 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months E-mail us to subscribe to our quarterly newsletter inquiry THE 2013 HAVE TO Santas not the only one giving things away this December Check out these deals at Kingland in Hay River to or 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fa E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.com ww Lorraine Peterson Fleet Manager NGLAND FORD SALES LTD 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867-874-7716 -mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.com Tina Duggan Finance Manager Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Lorraine Peterson Fleet Manager Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Matt Morse Sales Leasing ainePeterson et Manager Tina Melvin Finance Manager erCab XLT 4x4 40049 e 9250 nt 2561 CE 28238 MSRP 58899 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 4513 SALE PRICE 45136f 2013 F-150 SuperCrew Fx4 4x4 I3T664 MSRP 29049 Delivery Allowance 4250 Kingland Discount 1429 SALE PRICE 23370 2013 Focus TITANIUM 0 down 220 5.69 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3A08 RCREW XLT 4X4 43349 ance 9250 scount 2957 RICE 31142 278 3.49 -weekly for 60 months 52 3.49 weekly for 60 months CallTinyToday forPre-approval 1-800-661-0716 e to our quarterly newsletter inquirykinglandford.com 0 down only 399 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months NGLAND FORD SALES LTD 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867-874-7716 E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.com Tina Duggan Finance Manager Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Lorraine Peterson Fleet Manager Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Matt Morse Sales Leasing ainePeterson eet Manager Tina Melvin Finance Manager perCab XLT 4x4 40049 ce 9250 unt 2561 CE 28238 MSRP 58899 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 4513 SALE PRICE 45136f 2013 F-150 SuperCrew Fx4 4x4 I3T664 MSRP 29049 Delivery Allowance 4250 Kingland Discount 1429 SALE PRICE 23370 2013 Focus TITANIUM 0 down 220 5.69 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3A08 RCREW XLT 4X4 43349 wance 9250 scount 2957 PRICE 31142 278 3.49 i-weekly for 60 months 52 3.49 weekly for 60 months CallTinyToday forPre-approval 1-800-661-0716 e to our quarterly newsletter inquirykinglandford.com 0 down only 399 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months NGLAND FORD SALES LTD 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867-874-7716 -mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.com Tina Duggan Finance Manager Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Lorraine Peterson Fleet Manager Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Matt Morse Sales Leasing ainePeterson et Manager Tina Melvin Finance Manager perCab XLT 4x4 40049 e 9250 nt 2561 CE 28238 MSRP 58899 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 4513 SALE PRICE 45136f 2013 F-150 SuperCrew Fx4 4x4 I3T664 MSRP 29049 Delivery Allowance 4250 Kingland Discount 1429 SALE PRICE 23370 2013 Focus TITANIUM 0 down 220 5.69 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3A08 RCREW XLT 4X4 43349 wance 9250 scount 2957 RICE 31142 278 3.49 -weekly for 60 months 52 3.49 weekly for 60 months CallTinyToday forPre-approval 1-800-661-0716 e to our quarterly newsletter inquirykinglandford.com 0 down only 399 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months GLAND FORD SALES LTD 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT 74-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867-874-7716 saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.com Tina Duggan Finance Manager Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Lorraine Peterson Fleet Manager eve Moll Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Matt Morse Sales Leasing eterson nager Tina Melvin Finance Manager ab XLT 4x4 40049 9250 2561 28238 MSRP 58899 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 4513 SALE PRICE 45136f 2013 F-150 SuperCrew Fx4 4x4 I3T664 MSRP 29049 Delivery Allowance 4250 Kingland Discount 1429 SALE PRICE 23370 2013 Focus TITANIUM 0 down 220 5.69 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3A08 EW XLT 4X4 43349 9250 2957 E 31142 3.49 ly for 60 months 3.49 for 60 months CallTinyToday forPre-approval 1-800-661-0716 our quarterly newsletter inquirykinglandford.com 0 down only 399 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months HE 2013S VE TO GO not the only g things away ecember out these Kingland in y River PLUS get 500to use towards accessories or maintenence plans with every 2013 purchase. 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT 874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867-874-7716 andford.com www.kinglandford.com www.kinglandsaleshr.com Spencer King Dealer Principal Dewey Roy Sales Leasing KINGLAND FORD SALES LTD. 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867-874-7716 Email saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.com www.kinglandsaleshr.comKINGLAND FORD SALES LTD 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867-874-7716 E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.com Tina Duggan Finance Manager Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Lorraine Peterson Fleet Manager Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales T643 Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Matt Morse Sales Leasing Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing DonneLeeJungkind Vehicle RV Sales LorrainePeterson Fleet Manager Tina Melvin Finance Manager 2013 F150 SuperCab XLT 4x4 MSRP 40049 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2561 SALE PRICE 28238 MSRP 58899 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 4513 SALE PRICE 45136f 2013 F-150 SuperCrew Fx4 4x4 I3T664 MSRP 29049 Delivery Allowance 4250 Kingland Discount 1429 SALE PRICE 23370 2013 Focus TITANIUM 0 down 220 5.69 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3A08 2013 F150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 MSRP 43349 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2957 SALE PRICE 31142 0 down 278 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months T671 0 down 252 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months CallTinyToday forPre-approval 1-800-661-0716 E-mail us to subscribe to our quarterly newsletter inquirykinglandford.com 0 down only 399 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months KINGLAND FORD SALES LTD 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867-874-7716 E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.com Tina Duggan Finance Manager Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Lorraine Peterson Fleet Manager Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales T643 Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Matt Morse Sales Leasing Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing DonneLeeJungkind Vehicle RV Sales LorrainePeterson Fleet Manager Tina Melvin Finance Manager 2013 F150 SuperCab XLT 4x4 MSRP 40049 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2561 SALE PRICE 28238 MSRP 58899 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 4513 SALE PRICE 45136f 2013 F-150 SuperCrew Fx4 4x4 I3T664 MSRP 29049 Delivery Allowance 4250 Kingland Discount 1429 SALE PRICE 23370 2013 Focus TITANIUM 0 down 220 5.69 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3A08 2013 F150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 MSRP 43349 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2957 SALE PRICE 31142 0 down 278 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months T671 0 down 252 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months CallTinyToday forPre-approval 1-800-661-0716 E-mail us to subscribe to our quarterly newsletter inquirykinglandford.com 0 down only 399 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months KINGLAND FORD SALES LTD 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867-874-7716 E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.com Tina Duggan Finance Manager Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Lorraine Peterson Fleet Manager Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales T643 Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Matt Morse Sales Leasing Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing DonneLeeJungkind Vehicle RV Sales LorrainePeterson Fleet Manager Tina Melvin Finance Manager 2013 F150 SuperCab XLT 4x4 MSRP 40049 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2561 SALE PRICE 28238 MSRP 58899 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 4513 SALE PRICE 45136f 2013 F-150 SuperCrew Fx4 4x4 I3T664 MSRP 29049 Delivery Allowance 4250 Kingland Discount 1429 SALE PRICE 23370 2013 Focus TITANIUM 0 down 220 5.69 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3A08 2013 F150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 MSRP 43349 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2957 SALE PRICE 31142 0 down 278 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months T671 0 down 252 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months CallTinyToday forPre-approval 1-800-661-0716 E-mail us to subscribe to our quarterly newsletter inquirykinglandford.com 0 down only 399 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months KINGLAND FORD SALES LTD 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867-874-7716 E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.com Tina Duggan Finance Manager Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Lorraine Peterson Fleet Manager Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Matt Morse Sales Leasing Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing DonneLeeJungkind Vehicle RV Sales LorrainePeterson Fleet Manager Tina Melvin Finance Manager 2013 F150 SuperCab XLT 4x4 MSRP 40049 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2561 SALE PRICE 28238 MSRP 58899 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 4513 SALE PRICE 45136f 2013 F-150 SuperCrew Fx4 4x4 I3T664 MSRP 29049 Delivery Allowance 4250 Kingland Discount 1429 SALE PRICE 23370 2013 Focus TITANIUM 0 down 220 5.69 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3A08 2013 F150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 MSRP 43349 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2957 SALE PRICE 31142 0 down 278 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months 0 down 252 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months CallTinyToday forPre-approval 1-800-661-0716 E-mail us to subscribe to our quarterly newsletter inquirykinglandford.com 0 down only 399 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months THE 2013S HAVE TO GO Santas not the only one giving things away this December Check out these deals at Kingland in Hay River PLUS get 500to use towards accessories or maintenence plans with every 2013 purchase. 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867-874-7716 E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.com www.kinglandsaleshr.com Tina Melvin Finance Manager Call Tina today for Pre-approval 1-800-661-0716 2015 FOCUS S Employee Price Adjustment 723 SHARE OUR EMPLOYEE PRICE 17841 TOTAL PRICE ADJUSTMENTS 723 ST model shown 2015 ESCAPE SE Employee Price Adjustment 2306 Delivery Allowance 500 SHARE OUR EMPLOYEE PRICE 28083 TOTAL PRICE ADJUSTMENTS 2806 SE model shown 2015 ESCAPE SE SE model shown SE model shown 2015 FIESTA SE Employee Price Adjustment 1306 Delivery Allowance 1500 SHARE OUR EMPLOYEE PRICE 17008 TOTAL PRICE ADJUSTMENTS 2806 SE model shown 2015 FIESTA SE Employee Price Adjustment 1306 Sport model shown 2015 EXPLORER XLT Employee Price Adjustment 4257 SHARE OUR EMPLOYEE PRICE 43687 TOTAL PRICE ADJUSTMENTS 4257 Sport model shown 2015 EXPLORER XLT Vehiclesmaybeshownwithoptionalequipment.Dealermaysellorleaseforless.Limitedtimeoffers.Offersonlyvalidatparticipatingdealers.Retailoffersmaybecancelledorchangedatanytimewithoutnotice.Seeyour FordDealerforcompletedetailsorcalltheFordCustomerRelationshipCentreat1-800-565-3673.ForfactoryordersacustomermayeithertakeadvantageofeligibleraincheckableFordretailcustomerpromotionalincentives offersavailableatthetimeofvehiclefactoryorderortimeofvehicledeliverybutnotbothorcombinationsthereof.RetailoffersnotcombinablewithanyCPAGPCorDailyRentalincentivestheCommercialUpfitProgramorthe CommercialFleetIncentiveProgramCFIP.FordEmployeePricingEmployeePricingisavailablefromJuly12015toSeptember302015theProgramPeriodonthepurchaseorleaseofmostnew20152016Fordvehicles excludingallchassiscabstrippedchassisandcutawaybodymodelsF-150RaptorF-650F-750MustangShelbyGT500ShelbyGT35050thAnniversaryLimitedEditionMustang.EmployeePricingreferstoA-Planpricing ordinarilyavailabletoFordofCanadaemployeesexcludinganyUniforCAWnegotiatedprograms.Thenewvehiclemustbedeliveredorfactory-orderedduringtheProgramPeriodfromyourparticipatingFordDealer.Allchassis cabstrippedchassiscutawaybodyF-150RaptorMediumTruckMustangBoss302andShelbyGT500excluded.EmployeePriceadjustmentsarenotcombinablewithCPAGPCCFIPDailyRentalAllowanceandAXZDF- Planprograms.Deliveryallowancesarenotcombinablewithanyfleetconsumerincentives.2015FordMotorCompanyofCanadaLimited.Allrightsreserved.