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Serial smugglers keep RCMP busy TheRCMPseeasteadystream of coffee makers juice jugs cereal boxes and laundry detergent stuffed with drugs or booze. See page 3. Hay is for horses but this river has rice After 30 years of seeding wild rice around the NWT Pat Bobinski says 2015 saw a record crop. See page 22. EKATI BEST IN THE WEST Emergency rescue team wins national skills competition. See page 23. Fort Simpson knows how to rock and roll Thebandthestolenprototype guitar and the NWT commu- nity that rallied to nd it in time for the show to go on. See page 16. Senator holds no punches in tell-all memoir Senator Nick Sibbeston was not shy when he penned his memoir which he released this week. See page 8. V IS IT W W W .N O R J.C A A national award winning independent newspaper serving northern Alberta and the Northwest Territories since 1977 1.00 September 22 2015 Vol. 39 No. 21 BY CRAIG GILBERT TheGNWTsnewdraftlandsprotec- tion plan blew through Tom Hoefers ofce like a Great Slave gale. TheexecutivedirectoroftheNWT- Nunavut Chamberof Mines said last weekhisorganizationwasshocked by the content of the 12-page NWT Conservations Areas Action Plan 2015-2020. The voice of the North- ernminingandexplorationindustry since 1967 is worried the amount of land the draft plan proposes forbid- ding industrial development on will createuncertaintyintheexploration communityandsignalinvestorsthat the NWT is closed for business. The number raising alarms ap- pears in one reference near the end ofthedocumentindicatingthatupto 40 per cent of the NWTs 1.2 million square-kilometrelandmasscouldbe protectedfromdevelopment.Assess fragmentationandtheneedsfornew conservationareastoensurecontinued connectivity between core protected areas and to contribute towards a target of 40 per cent in conservation areas in the NWT reads Action 5.2. Each of the plans actions has a timeframe attached. Addressing that 40 per cent target is scheduled for year ve 2019-2020 but a re- view of the Territorial Parks Act is scheduled to begin this fall. Today about 130000 sq-km or slightly more than nine per cent of the NWT is off-limits to industry. In 2013 10.4 per cent of Canadas Act 23146 sq-km are withdrawn for surface development but may permit subsurface development with conditions. Changes to either of those types of protected land re- quire an act of parliament. Land use plans subject to review everyveyearsprohibitdevelopment feedback on it. The plan circulated to stakeholders including First Na- tions environmental and industry associations asks what is missing andwhethertheplanallowsenough exibility and space for a diversity of conservation values to be part of our collective conservation narrative. Thediscussionandthoseopinions are important Miltenberger said. He said the document is an exten- sion of the national action plan for conservationwhichtracesitsgenesis backto1999andthatitshouldnotbe a shock to anyone involved. Thereisnonewlandidentiedin theplanandsomeofthoseareashave beenonthebookssince1970hesaid. Further he said the 40 per cent is split in two 20 per cent of the land would be completely protected from developmentwhiletherestwouldhave conservationdesignationsforavariety ofreasonsculturalrecreationalbut wouldbeopentodevelopmentshould it be deemed warranted. He said there are six levels of protection within the Parks act and ve of them allow some form of development. See Land on page 6. land area including freshwater lakes and about 0.9 per cent of its marine area was protected it is a signatory to an international accord aimed at protecting 17 per cent of land and 10 per cent of marine areas world- wide by 2020. National parks 102930 sq-km in NWT prohibit any surface or sub- surface development while areas protected by the Migratory Birds inagivenareaforaslongasthey are in place. The only one in the NWT is the Gwichin Land Use Plan which protects almost 6000 sq-km. MichaelMiltenbergerministerre- sponsiblefornanceandtheenviron- ment told the Journal last week the plan would create more certainty for investors not scare them off. Hestressedtheplanisstilladraft and that the GNWT is looking for Government mining industry miles apart on proposed land protection plan Nobody is going to put their money in that 20 per cent where there is protection against development. Tom Hoefer NWT-Nunavut Chamber of Mines Brad Caribou Legs Firth aproaches the Centennial Flame on Parliament Hill in Ottawa Sept. 19 accompanied by local artist and activist Jaime Koebel. On Sept. 21 Firth ofcially completed an ultra marathon for water protection awareness that started in Vancouver B.C. on June 1. For more on his 4400-kilometre journey and the cause head to page 14. PhotoTsulGraphics 2 Tuesday September 22 2015 HEALTH WELLNESS MENS CANCER NEWS BRIEFS Townsturnthepagewithnewlibraries BookwormsintwoNorthwestTerritoriescommunitieshave a new place to dig in. Dignitaries including education and culture Minister Jackson Lafferty gathered in Fort Simp- son to cut the ribbon on the new John Tsetso Memorial Li- brary Sept. 15. The library has lled its new space with an expandedcollectionincludingiPadswithdigitallanguage apps. The school library at Elizabeth Mackenzie Elemen- tary School in Behchoko will celebrate its grand opening as the new community public library Sept. 25. Kings sell off business empire TheKingFamilyannouncedMondaymorningtheysoldKing- landHayRiverKinglandYellowknifeKinglandFreightliner KingManufacturingMiningDivisionKlassicAutobodyand Hay River Esso effective September 30. They retained Kal TireTireNorthaccordingtoamessagepostedonFacebook. Wehavesoldtoafuture-drivencompanythatiswellknown in the vehicle industry the message read. Go Auto shares the King Familys vision of excellent customer service and care for our employees. An important part of the decision was an agreement with the new owners that all employees are retained and have job security. We sincerely appreciate your business over the past 50 years. Winter is coming check your CO detectors The NWT Fire Marshal reminds residents that with the beginning of another winter all residents should check theircarbonmonoxidesafetypreparedness.AspartofFire Prevention Week the Ofce of the Fire Marshal will run a HomeFireSafetycontest.Residentsandtheirchildrenare encouraged to ll out an online checklist at www.maca. gov.nt.ca and all completed checklists will be entered into the contest prize draw. The entry deadline is October 30. Please leave a message at 872-5543 for details. WESCLEAN NORTHERN SALES LTD. Ph 867 875-5100 Fax 867 875-5155 Avalon Cat Hair - long Size - medium Gender - female Avalon is a very loving and beautiful cat. She is spayed and is up-to-date with all her shots.If you think you have a home for a Avalon please call the shelter at 872-5543. Please leave a message at 872-5543 for details. WESCLEAN NORTHERN SALES LTD. Ph 867 875-5100 Fax 867 875-5155 E-mail infowescleannwt.com web www.wescleannwt.com Avalon Cat Hair - long Size - medium Gender - female Avalon is a very loving and beautiful cat. She is spayed and is up-to-date with all her shots.If you think you have a home for a Avalon please call the shelter at 872-5543. Please leave a message at 872-5543 for details. WESCLEAN NORTHERN SALES LTD. Ph 867 875-5100 Fax 867 875-5155 E-mail infowescleannwt.com web www.wescleannwt.com Avalon Cat Hair - long Size - medium Gender - female Avalon is a very loving and beautiful cat. She is spayed and is up-to-date with all her shots.If you think you have a home for a Avalon please call the shelter at 872-5543. SpayedNeutered Up-to-datewithroutineshots House trained GracieFemaleBaby Grey tabby Looking for a new home Heres Gracie. Shes the sweetest little kitten youll ever meet and shes so calm and relaxed. Give this sweet little baby kitty her forever home Fort Smith Health Social Services Authority STARTS ON OCTOBER 13 2015 From 1030 am noon daily at Community Counselling Services at the Fort Smith Health Centre THE ADULT MATRIX Outpatient Addictions Treatment Program This program is offered to accommodate those who wish to receive local support with addictions. It is open to anyone dealing with an addiction or wanting to maintain their sobriety. This FREE program is 10 weeks in length with daily 1.5 hour sessions and bi-weekly one-to-one sessions with a counsellor. CALL 867 872-6310 to book an intake appointment By DALI CARMICHAEL A recovering alcoholic Jef- fery Amos knows rst-hand the importance of living a healthy lifestyle. Nowamenshealthadvocate fortheInuvialuitRegionalCor- porationinInuvikAmosuses hisexperiencestoencouragehis clients to take proactive mea- sures to protect their health. This means being active staying active eating health- ier fresh foods he said. In the last few years Ive taken it upon myself to see a doc- tor every six months and I do a regular medical check-up. Ive tried hard to encourage men in general to try to limit or even avoid drinking alco- hol or smoking. Amos and the territorys chiefmedicalofcerDr.Andre Corriveaucametogethertoad- dress issues impacting mens healthonSept.14inrecogni- tion of Mens Cancer Health Awareness Month. Mens Cancer Health Awareness Month is not only about cancer its about men reecting on ways to improve overall health and wellness for their benet and for the benet of their families their children and their grandchil- dren Amos said. The trouble men are sta- tistically less likely to take preventativeactioninregards to their health. Itsbeenourexperienceover theyearsthatmentendtocome late for screenings they dont participateasmuchinscreen- ingprogramsCorriveausaid. Healthprofessionalsrecom- mend patients begin routine screeningsaroundage50unless thereisafamilyhistoryofdis- easeinwhichcasetheyshould consult their family physician about starting earlier. We know that especially in many of our small commu- nitiesparticipationinscreen- ingactivitiesislowCorriveau noted.Wedontevenreach20 percentofpeopleaftertheage of50forcolorectalscreening. Because of this men are morelikelytoaskforhelponce theyarealreadyexperiencing symptoms leading to a high rateofdiagnosisoftenatmore advanced stages of cancer or chronic disease. This could be attributed to the socialized expectations of men Amos said. As men there are expecta- tions for us to be strong and to be protectors of our family and our traditions to always be in control and never show vulnerability. High rates of alcoholism and smoking in the NWT are also linked to many chronic conditions. Cancer is the second lead- ing cause of death amongst men in the North after stroke and heart disease according to Corriveau. The three most commonlydiagnosedcancers inmenareprostatecolorectal cancers and lung cancer the latter being the most deadly causing 26 per cent of all can- cer-related deaths in the ter- ritory. Smoking rates in the NWTarebelievedtobeabout twice the national average. Smokingisstillthemain preventative factor for cancer overall not just here in the North but across the world Corriveausaid.Ithinkmany peoplearenotawareoftherole of alcohol and the increase in cancer risk. The Canadian Centre for Substance Abuse guidelines recommends no more than two drinks a day and 10 per week for women and three drinks a day and 15 per week for men. A drink is dened as aglassofwineorasinglebeer. Wehaveoneofthehighest rates of alcohol consumption inCanadainparticularbinge drinking which is really problematic Corriveau said. Menare3.5timesmorelikely to be heavy frequent drink- ers the category where you consume ve or more drinks in one sitting. About 24 per cent of males in the NWT identify them- selves as frequent drinkers. GNWT taking action Duringthenextsessionofthe Legislative Assembly the De- partmentofHealthandSocial Services is hoping to pass the territorysrstcancerstrategy. Weareplacingastrongem- phasisonhowtosupportNWT residentstoleadahealthylife- style and reduce their cancer risk Corriveau said. With the holistic strat- egy HSS looks to make the entire cancer journey better for patients from providing more access to screenings to improving recovery and pal- liative services. We were quite inspired and inuenced in a way by the ve cancer sharing circles we had over the last two-and- a-half years where we heard from communities and from patients and from families on the experience and what needed to be included. Chief medical ofcer recommends preventative action to avoid cancer PhotocourtesyoftheNWTDept.HealthSocialServives Dr. Andr Corriveau left and mens health advocate Jeffrey Amos on monitor hold a conference in Yellowknife addressing preventative health care on Sept. 14. Tuesday September 22 2015 3 JUSTICE SMUGGLING EDMONTON AB ALL Meetings held at the Chateau Nova Grand Room General Meeting Sept 2115 700 pm ACDEN Meeting Sept 2215 900 am ACFN-IRC Meeting Sept 2215 100 pm FORT MCMURRAY AB ALL Meetings held at the Stonebridge Clearwater Room General Meeting Sept 2315 700 pm ACDEN Meeting Sept 2415 900 am ACFN-IRC Meeting Sept 2415 100 pm FORT CHIPEWYAN AB ALL Meetings held at the EY Lodge General Meeting Sept 2815 700 pm ACDEN Meeting Sept 2915 900 am ACFN-IRC Meeting Sept 2915 100 pm FORT SMITH NT ALL Meetings held at the Meeting Room 182A McDougal Rd. General Meeting Sep 3015 700 pm ACDEN Meeting Oct 115 900 am ACFN-IRC Meeting Oct 115 100 pm NOTICEOF MEETING DATES FOR ATHABASCA CHIPEWYAN FIRST NATION MEMBERS Refreshments will be served. Wishing you an awe-inspiring golden birthday lots of love your family Wishing you an awe-inspiring golden birthday lots of love your familyyour familyy Wishing you an awe-inspiring golden birthday lots of love your Family happy Five perFect tens day to our wonderful father grandfather husband and best friend happy Five perFect tens day to our wonderful father grandfather husband and best friend happy Five perFect tens day to our wonderful father grandfather husband and best friend BY CRAIG GILBERT The best part of waking up is Folgers in your cup the old jingle goes. Substitute a mug of coffee for a carafe stuffed with a half-pound of weed and a box of cereal containing a similar haul and that is the kind of week NWT RCMP had. Between Sept. 11 and 14 police seized smug- gled marijuana and alcohol in four separate busts at the Yellowknife and Tulita airports. Constable Elenore Sturko said busts sometimes occur in clusters but not all are announced in press releases. The seizure stream is relatively steady with officers finding contraband routinely through- out the NWT and ingenuity is rarely in short supply. If you can imagine a creative way some- one would use to attempt to smuggle theres a good chance someone really is doing that Sturko said. Although interesting its sad the lengths to which people go to support illegal alcohol in their communities. On Sept. 11 ofcers found 181 grams of marijuana in a cereal box packed with other supplies destined for Lutselke and six bottles of vodka in another package being shipped to Gameti in the same Yellowknife hangar just hours later. The boxed up coffee-maker with 196 grams of marijuana in seven individual bags in- side was discovered at Tulitas airport on Sept. 14. A 22-year-old Tulita woman was charged with possession for the purpose of trafficking. RCMP are aware of attempts to smug- gle illicit substances into town using boats and airplanes Sturko wrote in a press re- lease. Drug trafficking is a problem that creates many spin-off crimes and affects all Northerners and police will continue enforcement in all areas of transportation in which illicit drugs make their way into the community. The RCMP have also seized Five Alive also destined for Lutselke laundry deter- gent bottles lled with booze and dozens of over-ration alcohol destined for or within restricted communities including Behchoko Deline and Fort McPherson since the start of August. Charges havent been laid in those ongoing investigations. Sturko wouldnt reveal the tactics or tech- niques ofcers use to counter smuggling. We want to keep those investigative tac- tics viable she said. Those restrictions are in place because the communities see drug and alcohol abuse as a concern and the RCMP will continue to work with them to enforce the territorial liquor law. Stabbings machine guns drugs and multiple arrests Meanwhile police are busy making arrests in the Municipality of Wood Buffalo. During the early morning hours of Sept. 13 FortChipewyanRCMPrespondedtocomplaints ofapossiblestabbingontheDogheadReserve. A female victim was located and transported by emergency medical services then airlifted to hospital in Edmonton. She had serious but non life-threatening injuries. Amalesuspectwaslocatedashorttimelater and taken into custody. A search warrant was executedattheresidencewherethesuspectwas arrested.DaltonVermillion20amaleresident of Fort McMurray has been charged with mul- tiple Criminal Code infractions including ag- gravated assault in relation to the incident and has been remanded in custody. OnSept.10policeexecutedasearchwarrant ataresidenceonLoutitRoadresultinginseveral charges being laid against 35-year-old Clayton Vickers. The charges are as follows Two counts each possession of a restricted rearm unauthorized possession of a rearm unsafe storage of a rearm possession for the purpose of trafcking One count each possession of marijuana possession of property obtained by crime fail to comply with an undertaking About 10 grams of marijuana a 9mm pistol a machine gun and an undisclosed amount of cocaine and cash were seized. McMurray police also executed a search warrant at an Elmore Drive residence on Sept. 11 resulting in the arrest of three men. They seized approximately four ounces of cocaine 3400 in cash and undisclosed property from some recent break-and-enters within the municipality. The three men from Fort McMurray are MohamedOmar29chargedwithpossession forthepurposeoftrafckingandtwocounts ofpossessionofpropertyobtainedbycrime. Mohamud Omar 20 charged with posses- sionforthepurposeoftrafckingtwocounts of possession of property obtained by crime and fail to comply with an undertaking. Ismail Mohamed 19 charged with posses- sion for the purpose of trafcking and pos- session of property obtained by crime. On Sept. 18 Wood Buffalo RCMP executed a search warrant at a Fraser Avenue residence wherethreewomenwerearrested.Thesearch resulted in police seizing approximately three ouncesofcrackcocaine3000incashandan undisclosed amount of stolen property. Charged are RollaJabak19 possessionforthepurposeof trafckingandpossessionofstolenproperty. Dezerae Brown 23 possession for the purpose of trafcking and possession of Stolen Property. Taylor Bowin 21 possession for the pur- pose of trafcking and possession of sto- len property. All three women are from Fort McMur- ray and have been released from custody on cash bail. They are awaiting a court appear- ance on Sept. 30. Breakfast of un-champions NWT smugglers get creative smuggling contraband booze weed and cocaine RCMP in the NWT uncovered some creatively concealed drugs and alcohol in recent weeks seizing suspect cereal boxes juice jugs detergent bottles and even a coffee maker. PhotocourtesyofRCMP 4 Tuesday September 22 2015 The Northern Journal is an independent newspaper covering news and events in the western Arctic and northern Alberta. 2013 CCNA BLUE RIBBON CANADIAN COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER AWARD 2013 C M C A AUDITED The Northern Journal is published weekly by Cascade Publishing Ltd. Printed at Star Press Inc. Wainwright AB. Publisher................................................................................. Don Jaque 867-872-3000 ext.21 donnorj.ca Editor..................................................................................... Craig Gilbert 867-872-3000 ext.24 newsnorj.ca Reporter....................................................................... Dali Carmichael 867-872-3000 ext.25 reporternorj.ca Comptroller .......................................................Jessica Dell 867-872-3000 ext.23 webnorj.ca Advertising.............................. Heather Foubert Hay River 867-874-4106 adsnorj.ca Administration............................................Jeremy Turcotte 867-872-3000 ext.26 adminnorj.ca Production Manager ......................................Sandra Jaque 867-872-3000 ext.22 sandranorj.ca Graphics........................................................Paul Bannister 867-872-3000 ext.27 graphicsnorj.ca Letters to the Editor Policy The Northern Journal welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and include a phone number so the author can be veried. Names will be withheld on request in special circumstances where the reasons are determined to be valid. The Journal reserves the right to edit letters for length libel clarity and taste. Opinions expressed in letters and columns are not necessarily those of the publisher or editor. Advertising Deadlines Display ad deadline is Thursday at 400 p.m. Classied ad deadline is Thursday at 500 p.m. Email adsnorj.ca Subscription Rates Prices include GST. 47.25 in Fort Smith 52.50 elsewhere in Canada 105 in the USA overseas 164.30. EDITORIAL LETTER TO THE EDITOR CORRECTION In the Sept. 8 story Northern Voices ampli- ed at Ko Ke Storytelling Fest a photo of Quantum Tangle was incorrectly credited. ThephotoshouldhavebeencreditedtoKay- ley Mackay of Picture This Productions. The Journal apologizes for the error. We have a duty to the herons Editor I am a former resident of the NWT seven years in Fort Smith and three years in Yel- lowknife 1962 to 1972. My husband Bernard Gillie was Direc- tor of Education. I remained a homemaker one daughter born in B.C. before we moved to Fort Smith and another daughter born three years later. Bernard continued his career here in Vic- toria before retirement on the family farm. We considered the ten years in NWT as the best in our lives. He died in 1996. I nd that ones interest and care for the NWT continues in ones life and interest. I receive the copies of the Northern Journal as a letter from home and pass on the news to local former residents. While I am appalled at the news of the death of dozens of blue herons found dead at one of Syncrudes oilsands just north of Fort Mc- Murray I will pass on to my birdwatching friends and others this information. May I ask that you continue to inform your readers about any action taken by Syncrude and also public reaction We all have a duty to pass on the information and to demand Syncrudes replies and information if any regarding their actions in response. Again my deep thanks and those of friends. Mavis M. Gillie Victoria BC Vote also for those who run government An attractive pick as the best possible leader for Canada is Elizabeth May for what she says and what she stands for seems to resonate with what should be the true Canadian character. When it comes time to vote we the elec- torate are susceptible even gullible swayed by TV sound bytes and images crafted by marketing gurus the worst example is the throng following Donald Trump. Surely we in Canada dont want to be like that When Justin Trudeau walks toward you looking all doe-eyed and sincere in those television ads are you reacting to an image that advertising magicians burn into your brain or if you like him are you choosing a leader with skills and ability Keep in mind what Trudeau did in cutting loose Liberal senators was the only constructive act to improve the senate we have seen in the midst of all the controversy about it in over a decade. Would you vote against Tom Mulcair be- cause you dont like his beard or because you fear left-wing politics Mulcair has historically been a Liberal and his formi- dable performance as an Opposition leader in House of Commons debates is backed by experience a depth of knowledge and a sharp mind. Both those leaders would likely make good prime ministers and since this elec- tion is all about choosing an alternative to Stephen Harper if you dont like him or what he does your challenge is to deter- mine which one Mulcair or Trudeau is the better choice. The hope of the Conservatives is that the vote will split between the two so they can slip through and retain power. The move in 2003 to unite the right forming the federal Conservative Party was brilliant. Its kept the Conservatives in power since. The centre and left of Canadas politi- cal spectrum remains divided to the de- light of Conservatives. On the other side if you are not a Stephen Harper fan then you will have to vote strategically. That means waiting to make up your mind until the end of the campaign then going with the party that has the momentum to beat the Conservatives. An attractive pick as the best possible leader for Canada is Elizabeth May for what she says and what she stands for seem to resonate with what should be the true Canadian character. Unfortunately for her a vote for the Greens will take a vote away from one of the other two Harper opponents. A vote for the Greens is a vote for Harper. Many Canadians are dedicated to one party like sports fans with a favourite team and will vote for them regardless. Others vote for the best riding represen- tative selecting a Member of Parliament who will do the best job regardless of party affiliation. There is a third component to how the country is run that we voters un- fortunately know little of. Party insiders have a huge say in how policy and legis- lation are developed and executed by the party in power but they remain nameless and out of sight. Consider the power of the current Prime Ministers Office PMO and the role of young guns there revealed in the Mike Duffy scandal. It is now common knowl- edge that at the core of all that the Con- servative government does is a powerful group of young unelected Conservative Party stalwarts who run its actions. They tell Conservative MPs what to say and do and formulate - even dictate - legislation. They essentially run Canada. In addition there is a powerful group in the background mostly men old-school Conservatives who have tremendous sway over government policy. If you like Stephen Harper with his care- fully coiffed hair and his open at the neck dress shirts keep in mind that is an image and he is but one man. When you cast a vote it is for the whole package - includ- ing the young guns of the PMO who run government and those backroom old boys who have influence. In fact that will be a similar situation no matter which party is in power. A vote for who we feel will serve as the best local MP or if we place an X for the party we be- lieve has a leader who will do the best job running the country whether it be for the Conservatives again or the NDP or Liber- als to replace them keep in mind that be- yond the leader who is the face of the party is an unknown team that will have a very important role in how government is run. Try to find out about them. When you cast your ballot you are voting for them too. Eight baseball teams from Fort McPherson Aklavik and Inuvik joined Tsiigehtchic for the nal snow pitch game of the season at Tsiigley eld last weekend. Above Donnie Hendrick from Inuvik makes the muddiest catch of the day tagging out Shawn Firth of Aklavik. Below Dinah Blake from Fort McPherson attempts to beat a throw to rst base. After several days of drizzly weather with a mix of light snow Aklavik came out on top followed by Inuvik then Tsiigehtchic. PhotosLawrenceNorbert Tuesday September 22 2015 5 COLUMNS 15 Years Ago... Airport retrot A retrot to the Sachs Harbour Airport will go ahead thanks to 1.6 million in funding from the federal De- partment of Transport GNWT Minister of Transport Vince Steen has announced. The Sachs Harbour Airport was constructed in 1978 and has only received annual operations and maintenance care since. Issue September 19 2000 20 Years Ago... Admin team no-show at Chip school School was already underway when the Athabasca Delta Community School learned the principal and vice- principal they were expecting from down south had de- cided not to ll their positions. The husband and wife team waited until part-way through the rst week of school to notify the Northland School Board that they had decided not to move to Fort Chipewyan after all. Issue September 19 1995 30 Years Ago... Lumber industry to get 72000 Incentives will be provided to NWT lumber produc- ers to increase their harvest and construct roads to new timber and to encourage domestic retailers to purchase home-grown lumber in the off season. The NWT uses 25 million board feet of lumber per year but the domes- tic lumber industry provides only about one-fth of it. Issue September 19 1985 ARCHIVES Northern Journal 2015 Join us online Like Northern Journal on Facebook and get the weekly news delivered to your feed FACEBOOK FEEDBACK NWT responds to Syrian refugee crisis Eileen Norman I am deeply saddened and sickened by how shallow many people are in Canada how easily they are inuenced by the racist fearmongering of our government and many opinions pieces in the media and for sure - the absolutely disgusting comments from uninformed frightened uneducated people on social media. Please - educate yourselves on what is happening in the Middle East educate yourselves on where YOUR an- cestors came from and what drove them to nd refuge in Canada. Educate yourself about the many commu- nities in Canada where there are people different from yourselves Vietnamese Ukrainians South Americans Muslims and yes - even the once reviled Irish and how these refugees have contributed to our country. In 1956 we welcomed almost 40000 of the 200000 Hungar- ian refugees who escaped that country although you would never know it from the way they themselves are now reacting to helping others. Educate yourself on the statistical future of Canada our low birth rate the number of people per square mile the statistics of how many excellent doctors nurses engineers teachers and small businesses we depend on who come from these countries - especially the Middle East Companies who employ Canadians of all races and religions. I had no idea how many bigoted people there are in this country - thank goodness Donald Trump is not run- ning here. We have a close enough facsimile of the Re- publican Party in ofce already and it aint pretty. How very fortunate we are in this country that we have never been bombed our children and family killed and maimed. We sit and yawn on our couches and wonder what we will cook for dinner while we watch the news videos of bombed out streets and smoking buildings with people wandering through the rubble - like its a video game. We rush our babies into the outpatient room at the lo- cal nursing stationhospital because they have a fever. Imagine if your babys leg was blown off and the hospital no longer exists Give your heads a shake count your blessings and imagine yourself in their shoes. I dont know anybody who would venture out with their children to cross Great Slave Lake in a crowded rubber raft much less pay for the privilege with their last savings. How awful it must be to have to make that choice and to think crossing an ocean in one of those is better than staying where you are. By DAWN KOSTELNIK Itdoesnttakemuchtoopen thebag.Thereisnowrapping papertobeboughtanywhere andheisadad.Insideissome- thingwhiteandheavy. Ipullit out of the bag it weighs a ton itishugeabigwhiteblanket There is not much denition to it. Oh OK I see a hood and arms it is some type of par- kie very different. It is from the Eastern Arctic they have a different style of parka in the east the hood is very big with a funny point at the top. Thereisnozipperanditcomes down longer in the back than thefrontbutthefrontreaches to my knees. It is huge I will have to tie a rope around the waisttomakeitt. Everypart of it is white very white. How do I keep this clean My father has a big smile on his face do you like it he asks with happiness in his voice. Oh Daddy I love it What can I say He is so very happy. I wanted something that wasnt green I now have a parkie that is denitely not greenandforsurenotgroovy. He is excited that it will keep mewarmwhenwegosealingin the spring on the sea ice you can sneak right up on a seal with that on you will have to becarefulnottogetlostinthe snow we will never nd you. No zipper so you can pull it right over your head and the wind wont blow through A perfect father parka Mymotherislookingathim strangely.Johnnydidyoufor- gettheotherpresentsheasks. HelooksbackconfusedIam notsurewhatotherpresent The one we talked about just before you left More bewil- derment my mother reaches behind her and pulls out an- otherpackage.Thisisforyou Dawn.Thisisnotusualinmy lifetwobirthdaypresentsdoes nothappen. Idontknowwhat to do Thank you. I open the brown paper package and Oh my God Another parkie Do I have to choose between the two How could I not choose the parkie that makes my dad so happy Thisparkieisnavybluewith a zipper and contrasting trim along the bottom wolverine furaroundthehoodandcuffs and bottom. It is beautiful I pull it out slowly it is short I try it on. It ts just right just abovemykneesIcanrunlike the wind in this parka. Do I get to keep it Of course you do you can have both. The navy blue parka is absolutely perfect.IfIhadsewnitmyself Iwouldhavepickedeverything exactly like this it is not at all practicalitisbeautiful.Ican- not wear this out hunting. My dadisnotsayingmuchIguess herememberedhearingabout a parka and small parts of the conversation. Now I have two parkas this is unheard of. Youonlyhaveonebodyyou can only wear one at a time why would you have two I know why I need two. Dad I cannot go out on the ice hunt- ingwithmygroovyparkiebut I can go if I put my beautiful whiteparkieovertop.Itisbig enoughtowearovertopIwill bedoublewarmwarmerthan anyone this is perfect thank you so much. In town I will wearmybeautifulnavyparkie to school. I have everything I will be cool and warm at the sametime.Itcangetnobetter www.thewhitegirl.ca White Girl High fashion The Bucket List Canadian Towns You Must Visit from www.EscapeHere.com By Bruce Yaccato 1.FortSmithNorthwest Territories Fort Smith de- serves a place on the bucket list if for no other reason than it is a gateway to the remote spectacular World Heritage Site Wood Buffalo National Park. The northern boreal plain and forest is home to endangered species like wood bison whooping cranes per- egrine falcons and seemingly endlessacresofpristinenatu- ral beauty that are a paradise for the outdoor enthusiast. Its nameinChipewyanisTheba- cha or beside the rapids and thoserapidsontheSlaveRiver areamajorattractionforwhite water buffs today. 2. Rankin Inlet Nuna- vut In Inuktitut its called Kangiqtiniq meaningdeepinlet.Ithasbe- comethegatewaytotheterri- toryforcivilservantsmining execsscientistsandadventure travel acionados hence the cell phone service and golf coursesnotcommontotherest of the region. There is a thriv- ing Inuit art scene especially in ceramics and carving. For exploring the stunning pris- tine Iqalugaarjuup Nunanga the land around the river of little shes Territorial His- toric Park has hiking shing and fauna that you wont see south of 90 degrees north. Therearealsohabitationsand graveyardsfromthe13thcen- tury. To celebrate spring Pak- aluk Time there is a festival whichincludesmusicdancing and the famous unique Inuit sport competitions. 3. Dawson Yukon You canstillpanforgoldandhave thefamousSourToecocktail. For a more satisfying taste attempt to make it yourself It was parodied by a Daw- son banker named Robert W. Service in The Ballad of the Ice-Worm Cocktail a story of a gullible Englishman who downed one with great trepi- dationandcomicresults.The romance of the Gold Rush evenmorethanacenturycome and gone remains. Such was the transient wealth it was called the Paris of the North. Heritagebuildingsfromits15 minutes of wealth and fame abound. And yes you can see thecan-cangirlsatGambling Gertiesbutitsnotaone-trick pony. Cruise the Yukon River andor hike 1700 feet up the Midnight Dome and take in the views of it and the Klond- ike Valley. Parks Canada has a nice tour from Crocus Bluff to Services cabin in the hills conductedwithexcerptsfrom his legendary poetry. 4. Nelson British Co- lumbia For a town of under 10000peoplethereisawhole lotgoingoninNelson.Theski- ingintheKootenayRockiesis sensational.Whenitstimefor water skis Lake Kootenay of- fers any activity you want on and under the water. Ther- malandnaturalbathsareless than an hour away as is the beginning of the provinces fabulous wine country. Nel- sonissomethingofanartistic community with a surprising cacheofVictorianQueenAnne and Beaux Arts architecture. Thetownwebsiteclaimsmore restaurants per capita than San Francisco. It also likely has more hippies per capita as the counterculture is bred by American draft dodgers during the Vietnam War and continues on today. 5. Legal Alberta A proud little town whose web- site says it puts unity back into community. Its close enough to be considered a suburb of Edmonton but it retains its separate identity with its old rural charm in- tact. Still bilingual it was founded as a French-speak- ing settlement in 1894 be- fore Alberta was a province and less than a decade after French Canadas champion Louis Riel was hanged for treason. The stop signs still say ArrtStop. Legal is re- nowned for its 28 French murals and its summer Fte Au Village or Town Festival. 6 Tuesday September 22 2015 ENVIRONMENT CONSERVATION The NWT Seniors Society advocates for the rights and quality of life for senior citizens across the NWT. We want to be assured that the political candidates in this election have issues that affect seniors as their priorities. We would like you the voter to keep that in mind too. The candidates answers to the questions will be posted in the newspaper in early October. Lets make sure our seniors are assured of a good life Bob Stewart Libertarian Dennis Bevington NDPFloyd Roland Conservative John Moore GreenMichael Mcleod Liberal Here are four questions we are asking all the Federal MP candidates 1. Will you advocate for national strategies for housing poverty food security and seniors If so what measures do you consider most important to include in these strategies 2. Do you support an enhanced federal Northern Residents Deduction for seniors based on cost of living Why or why not 3. What actions will you take to reduce living costs throughout the NWT 4. The federal government introduced the Social Finance Accelerator Initiative which provides for private investment in community organizations that address persistent social problems. Do you agree with this approach to addressing social problems Why or why not Continued from page 1. The new conservation plan would lead to more land being identied for development as thegovernmentestablisheslanduseagreements with First Nations according to the minister. Were saying our priority has to be work- ing with First Nations to resolve outstanding land claims in the North Miltenberger said. Its an issue of certainty. We have 144000 sq-km of land tied up has been for the last 27 years in unsettled land claims. As we move forward as a territory the 18th As- sembly especially as the rst government post-devolution were identifying the need to work with the Aboriginal governments to in fact settle the land claims and have that frozen land released so its clear what lands the Aboriginal government owns and what lands revert to crown land. He said the government wants develop- ment to occur in a careful sustainable way. Hoefer wishes the plan had been revealed in a more careful sustainable way. He said draft or not including a target like 40 per cent in such a plan creates doubt in the already wary minds of investors and that concern is measured each year in the Fra- ser Institutes Survey of Mining Companies. The NWT always shows up as very attrac- tive geologically but drops way down because of all the uncertainty he said. There are people watching always. In 2013 the NWT got high marks for min- eral potential with 74 per cent of companies saying that factor was enticing or at least not a deterrent to investing on par with other jurisdictions with resource-centric econo- mies like Alaska Nevada Nunavut and the Yukon. When it came to uncertainty over what lands would be protected as parks or archeological sites 59 per cent of companies considered the situation in the NWT to be a mild or strong deterrent to investment. Un- disputed land claims rated as not a deter- rent to investment in the NWT for 40 per cent of respondents while 45 per cent said it was a mild or strong deterrent 25 and 20 per cent respectively. Where do you put the money in your RRSPs Hoefer asked rhetorically. Where there is a low risk and a good return. Nobody is going to put money into that 20 per cent where there is protection. He said there is already a regulatory frame- work protecting the land from wayward or irresponsible development including the en- vironmental assessment EA process which the Dominion Diamond Corp.s Jay pipe ex- pansionatEkatimineisworkingthroughnow. This calls into question the validity of the governments environmental assessment processes Hoefer said. There are all kinds of regulations that industry has to follow in order to protect the environment. So these kinds of protections in the draft plan say we just want to take this land right out of circulation and I dont think we can afford it particularly if we are in a post-devolu- tion world where we are pursuing increased self-reliance. Norman Wells Tulita Dlne Jean Marie RiverNahanni Butte Gamt What Fort Providence Behchok Wrigley Trout Lake Fort Resolution utselke Colville Lake Fort Good Hope Sachs Harbour Ulukhaktok Paulatuk Tuktoyaktuk Inuvik Tsiigehtchic Hay River Enterprise Fort Liard Fort McPherson Aklavik Kakisa Wekwet Yellowknife Detah Ndilo Fort Simpson Aulavik National Park Banks Island No. 1 Migratory Bird Sanctuary Banks Island No. 2 Migratory Bird Sanctuary Tuktut Nogait National Park Anderson River Delta Migratory Bird Sanctuary ehdacho Saoy Tsude niline Tueyeta Gwichin Settlement Area Sahtu Settlement Area Great Bear Lake Ezdzt Wekezhi Resource Management Area Thelon Wildlife Sanctuary Thaidene Nene Proposal Hidden Lake Territorial Park Wood Buffalo National Park Eji T Ndde Buffalo Lake River and Trails Sambaa Ke Kaagee Tu Edhzhe ue T Sli Nahanni National Park Reerve Ntsihchoh National Park Reserve British Columbia. Yukon South Slave Area Dehcho Area Alberta Saskatchewan Manitoba Nunavut Inuvialuit Settlement Region Kendall Island Migratory Bird Sanctuary Cape Parry Migratory Bird Sanctuary Pingo Canadian Landmark Gwichin Territorial Park Great Slave Lake Kelly Lake Doi TohCanol Heritage Trail Fort Smith Ding Wekhod 13000W14000W15000W 12000W 12000W 11000W 11000W 10000W 10000W 9000W 6000N 6000N 6500N 6500N 7000N 7000N 7500N 0 200 400100 km Established and Proposed Protection TerritorialProvincial Boundary Draft Dehcho Land Use Plan Boundary Settled Land Claim Boundary Conservation Areas in Land Use Plans Conservation Areas in Approved Land Use Plans Proposed Conservation Initiative in Sahtu Land Use Plan Dehcho interim draft conservation zones Surface and subsurface interim land withdrawal Hay River Reserve and Salt River First Nation Reserve Map created July 24 2015 Established Protection Proposed Protection Reserves Lands Withdrawn to Facilitate Land Claim Negotiation Surface only interim land withdrawal Subsurface only interim land withdrawal s Thaidene Nene interim and indeterminate land withdrawals Thaidene Nene Exclusion Area Thaidene Nene Caribou Area Conservation and Interim Land Withdrawals in the Northwest Territories A GNWT map illustrates protected lands in two shades of green. IllustrationcourtesyofGNWT Regulations already protect land says mines chamber opposing new conservation plan Whither diesel What if the water never comes back Tuesday September 22 2015 7 INDUSTRY ENERGY cascade graphics Advertising solutions Book design Brochures posters Business cardsStationery Cerlox Binding Document Printing Faxing - SendingReceiving ID Photos for treaty cards FAC Invitations custom design Laminating Logo design Marketing solutions Photography Photocopying - Up to 11 x 17 colour and black white Promo material Scanning Posters Banners Stickers Magnets Wedding Party favours Call us at 867.872.3000 Email us at graphicsnorj.ca or designnorj.ca or simply drop-in at 207 McDougal Rd Fort Smith NT We offer a range of custom design services that include We may have changed our look but we still offer all the quality products and services you are used to plus more. BY CRAIG GILBERT The GNWT has spent almost 50 million in two years covering the cost of diesel burned in place of hydroelectricity. Both times it was called a stopgap measure designed to prevent the Northwest Territo- ries Power Corporation from having to place a rate rider of up to 25 per cent on the bills of residents. Michael Miltenberger minister of nance and environment was quick to point out that the severe drought causing or con- tributing to the low water levels at the Snare and Bluesh hydro systems is wreaking eco- nomic havoc in jurisdictions up and down the Pacic Coast and across the Prairies. Fair enough but the drought is in its fourth year which begs the question How long can the GNWT cover the cost of powering the NWT with massive cheques for diesel What if the water never comes back RightoutofthegateregularMLAsincluding DarylDolynnyandBobBromleywerecriticalof the29.7millionpaymenttoNTPCannounced earlier this month and have been on Premier Bob McLeods case about alternatives for the long-term. Both believe the GNWT should be investing in renewable energy. Energy costs are the black hole question of the day for the NWT Dolynny told the Journal on Sept. 3. Bromley who isnt seek- ing re-election told the CBC the GNWT has sunk millions of dollars into one-off solutions with no return money that would be better spent subsidizing wind and solar projects. We are hoping the water is going to come back and through some miracle all the costs are going to go down or something he said. Wehavedonenothingintermsofinvestment. Bromley questioned the premier on the subject in the Legislature in March. McLeod replied that the government was at the time on schedule to respond to the recom- mendations made at the Energy Charette - a large-scalestakeholderforum-heldinNovember. At the same time we are doing a tremen- dousamountindevelopingalternative sources of energy McLeod said. We are the lead- ers in the country when it comes to biomass and other forms of renewable energy. I dont think that should be discounted. Bromley told the Journal on Sept. 21 solar makes more sense than diesel and the tens of millions of dollars being shelled out for fossil fuels could pay for a sustainable solution if it was instead spent on subsidies for consumers. Bumping up the subsidy to convince indi- viduals to install solar could easily offset the cost of diesel and would create that benet for the next 25 years all the solar equipment is guaranteed for 25 years now he said. There is a modest subsidy but if you reduced the payback from ten to seven or even ve years you could very well get enough to replace die- sel in that year and every year after. We need that kind of thinking but its very disappoint- ing that we havent done that feasibility. The Minister is on track but the government is very slow to do the work and its frustrating. Miltenberger told the Journal on Sept. 17 that the government knows paying 30 mil- lion for diesel every year is not sustainable economically or ecologically. We are hard at work looking at alterna- tives in terms of the generation capacity in the Yellowknife area and diesel-dependent communities around the NWT. What new technologies are out there The second Renewables in Remote Mi- crogrids conference took place in the capi- tal Sept. 15-17 the rst took place in Toronto in 2013. It was sponsored by Environment and Nat- ural Resources Bullfrog Power the Pembina Institute and Natural Resources Canada and attracted more than 100 leading experts community members manufacturers and researchers from across the United States and Canada. Amajorfocuswashelpingremoteindigenous communitiesgetoffdiesel.Miltenbergersaidthere are about 300 places in northern Canada that couldbenetfromgreentechnologyinthisway. We know we have to spend as a govern- ment tens upon tens of millions of dollars in the coming years to switch to renewables and get off diesel he said. Weve been working on that for the last three or four years. He added the government has in the works an expression of interest for green projects on the scale of one to ten megawatts in the Yellowknife area to respond to the urgency of the hydroelectricity shortage. We are denitely in a time of considerable change to the environment. Jim Sparling manager of climate change programs for Environment and Natural Re- sources takes a broad view of that consid- erable change. He does not share the concern expressed by Bromley and Dolynny arguing there is evidence the NWT has endured longer and deeper droughts than the current one. We dont know when the water comes back but theres a lot of evidence that there was a signicant ood-drought cycle more signi- cant than this one in the past 50 years he said. Using sediment cores in lakes or tree core samples we can see pretty signicant uctuations in past centuries and things have come back. Its always a ood-drought cycle. Things have come back. Its always a ood-drought cycle. Jim Sparling GNWT climate change programs manager 8 Tuesday September 22 2015 NORTHERNERS A MEMOIR COLLABORATE PROGRESS COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP www.rmwb.ca WE NEED YOUR HELP Volunteering on one of Wood Buffalos Council appointed Boards and Committees gives you the opportunity to shape the future of our community. Take a seat at the table today rmwb.caBoards NTLC Literacy Week 2015 NWT Wide Ad NJournal.indd 1 2015-09-14 143 PM By DALI CARMICHAEL Growing up Senator Nick Sibbestons mother always told him he would wear a white shirt. She had this idea that if I was educated and went to school that I wouldnt have to work so hard and live the life of a hunter and trapper he said. Those were encour- aging words because its like a mother putting out hope that someday youre going to be somebody someday you could be somebody. The former premier cab- inet minister and MLA re- leased his memoir You Will Wear a White Shirt in Yel- lowknife on Sept. 21. The candid autobiography takes the reader back as far as 1943 - when Sibbeston was born to a single mother in Fort Simp- son - through his experiences in residential school and his resulting healing journey all the way to his time in the Senate. My hope is that every household in the North will have this book if possible he said. I really think theres good information about the way life was in the early years and also the political devel- opment within it. Theres been a lot of changes and I was part of that. I think its a good historical document a good history about the gov- ernment and society in the North. An ongoing education When his mother fell ill with tuberculosis Sibbeston began attending residential schools across the territory starting in Fort Providence and moving to Inuvik Fort SmithandnallyYellowknife. Eachschooladdedanewlayer to his story some positive and formative like his time in Fort Smith while others were much darker. Eventually he headed south to Alberta for univer- sity. After failing out mar- rying his wife Karen and starting a family Sibbeston decided to hit the books again this time driven by the responsibilities of being a husband and father. From there he would take on roles in municipal and territorial government moving his way up the chain while attending law school and becoming one of Canadas rst Indigenous lawyers. Sibbestons journey is a tale of lifelong learning and teaching. As a justice special- ist for the GNWT a public administrator for Deh Cho Health and Social Services and member of the Cana- dian Human Rights tribunal he sought justice for those he represented by teaching incoming judges about the social realities impacting both Indigenous and non- Indigenous peoples. He had worked to address the abuses of residential school which he felt rst hand substance abuse and depression that seemed to be passed through the generations and families like his own divided by ill- ness and circumstance. Everything Ive done every aspect Ive been trying to have people understand I was trying to bridge the gap between the Dene and the social problems and the criminal court system he said. My life in the Legisla- tive Assembly again it wasnt just simply a matter of being there it was really trying to recognizetheDenelanguages and cultures and practices and trying to change a system of practices so it was more accommodating. Eventually Sibbeston him- self caved to his demons. Surrounded by a lifestyle of partying and boozing feel- ing pressure from his career and experiencing depression andPTSDfrompasttraumas he fell into a trap of alcohol- ism and adulterous relation- ships to numb the pressure of being a forward-pushing politician and the pain of his past. Ive had alcohol problems and stuff like that but I went to AA and Adult Children of AlcoholicsandIwentthrough a whole lot of treatment he said. When youre on a heal- ing journey you dont really care what people know be- cause you feel so much bet- ter having taken steps to heal yourself. He credits his recovery to his familys support at- tending ongoing treatment therapies and comforts in the Catholic faith. It was a conscious decision to write the memoir so can- didly Sibbeston said. It really exposes you. I felt wow everybody knows about me now my good parts and some of my bad parts he said. Maybe thats what makes it interesting. Its not just a fairytale story of all the things Ive accomplished. Ive done a lot but its been at a terrible cost. By sharing his trials trib- ulations and successes the senator from the NWT hopes to encourage others to be all they can be especially those intheyoungestdemographic. I would encourage peo- ple to get a good education to really strive Sibbeston said. Theres so many times along the way you could be discouraged and quit so I re- ally encourage young people today to get educated and go all the way right to the very top. Still a sitting senator Sib- beston hinted this year may be his last depending on who wins the upcoming federal election. Senator Nick Sibbeston gets candid in new memoir PhotoLaurieSibbeston Senator Nick Sibbeston released his memoir You Will Wear A White Shirt in Yellowknife Sept. 21. Traveling the territory with Ko Ke Storytelling Festival Tuesday September 22 2015 9 ARTS CULTURE STORYTELLING NWT Literacy Week Contact your school or follow us on Facebook for more information about this weeks events. How are you Im fine Good Thank you in Slavey Chipewyan and Cree September 20-26 This year staff and students are celebrating Aboriginal languages by learning how to say... By DALI CARMICHAEL The small chapel in Mission Parks historic church was packed Sept. 14 as Fort Smith lo- cals took in the offerings from this years Ko Ke Storytelling Festival. It was a rare opportunity for live perfor- mance in the small town as for the rst time theNorthernArtandCulturalCentresNACC annual autumn celebration of spoken word traveledtocommunitiesoutsideofYellowknife. Former CBC reporter Patti-Kay Hamilton opened the show passionately telling stories passed down from her in-laws. Radiating an excited energy she engaged the crowd getting them to participate as she acted out packs of men running through the forest and broke ta- boos asking her audience to smack their legs and whistle out to the northern lights. Next was Reneltta Arluk an actress who counts Fort Smith as one of her homes. Arluk described her summer as months of listening to cassette tapes curled up with a blanketandsometea.Thetapescontainedsto- ries from her recently deceased grandfather Archie Larocque which she decided to share. Loud applause and roars of laughter fol- lowed each of the tales from Larocques life as a trapper prospector and guard for the RCMP. Between Larocques sense of humour and the petit Arluks gruff impressions there was plenty of fodder for moments that were at once touching and comical. She nished her set with an audible con- tribution from Larocque a rendition of the country classic Green Green Grass of Home over an old acoustic guitar. Arluk followed up with her own rendition. Last but certainly not least was Quantum Tangle made up of Yellowknife-based artists Greyson Gritt and Tiffany Ayalik who closed out the show with a set that was truly a fu- sion of the traditional and the contemporary. Together the duo mixed Inuit throat sing- ing and legends with looping pedals and harmonic riffs from Gritts electric guitar. Quantum Tangle managed to take the crowd onanemotional rollercoasteras they explored plights of the modern Indigenous person from substance abuse issues to shallow questions about living cultures often using charm and comedy to bring the message home. Its always important to empower the voices of people that dont often get heard Gritt said in an interview with the Journal. I think any time that were giving a megaphone or a platform to folks that normally dont have a say or normally arent in the public eye or anything like that it just leads to more diver- sity it leads to understanding it leads to more sharing it means were taking steps towards equality and I always think thats important. Following the Fort Smith show performers headed to Norman Wells and Inuvik while a separate contingent of artists brought their talents to Fort Simpson. PhotoDonJaque Greyson Gritt Tiffany Ayalik Patti-Kay Hamilton and Reneltta Arluk told stories in Fort Smith on Sept. 14. 10 Tuesday September 22 2015 The Northwest Territories Teachers Association is proud to support on behalf of our 800 educators who promote literacy every day. Northwest Territories Teachers Association 5018 48th Street Box 2340 Yellowknife NT X1A 2P7 Phone Fax Email Website 867-873-8501 867-873-2366 nwttanwtta.nt.ca www.nwtta.nt.ca Literacy WeekLiteracy WeekLiteracy Week A reader today a leader tomorrow. Celebrating Literacy Week C M Y CM MY CY CMY K NORJ - Literacy Week 2015 copy.pdf 1 9152015 105348 AM EDUCATION LITERACY WEEK By DALI CARMICHAEL The NWT Centennial Library in Hay River sees itself as more than just a place to take out books. Located in the heart of the communitycen- tral to the towns main drag folks running the libraryconsideritahubofcommunitywellness. Promoting literacy in a community and making people feel part of a community by having a group space like this to do it in is an important part of wellness said library com- mittee vice president Tom Lakusta. Every community in the NWT has a list of commu- nity wellness priorities. There are about 10-15 priorities here and the library hits about ve or six of them. Now the organization is asking its users for help in the form of an annual book appeal fundraiser. Donations received between now and Christmas will be used to stock up on new books periodicals and audio materials. With every 20 donation made the philan- thropists name will be stamped into one of the new books. Though the library does receive some mon- etary aid from the town and through some of itsprogrammingthosedollarsareusedtokeep the operation aoat. Were very fortunate because the funding wehavewehave160000fromthetownthat allows us to hire not just staff library clerks and things like that to run the library when its openbutalsoforustohireaprogramlibrarian so we have somebody thats focused on lead- ingprogramsandpickingupnewprogramsin the community. Those programs include home delivery of books for seniors with limited mobility com- puter classes English as Second Language classes a monthly Philosophers Cafe for friendly debate parent and tot time a Lego clubgueststorytellersandwritingworkshops. We see reading to be a gift and part of what everypersonneedsintheirlivessowecontinu- allylookforavenuesforallpeopletoenjoywhat- ever aspect of literacy appeals most to them Lakusta said. It really unites all people from everyagegroupandeveryeconomicsituation. Tyrus Finstad shows off his superpowers during a superhero-themed event hosted at the NWT Centennial Library in Hay River. Hay River Library more than just a home for books PhotocourtesyofNWTCentennialLibrary Tuesday September 22 2015 11 www.auroracollege.nt.ca NWT Literacy Week 2014 September 22-26 Aurora College is committed to literacy at all levels no matter where you are on your educational journey. Our School of Developmental Studies offers a variety of options including part-time or full-time academic upgrading full-time Access Programs Introduction to Office Skills Start Your Own Business and Household Budgeting. The Developmental Studies program includes six levels that range from basic literacy to coursework at the Grade 12 level. A variety of programs courses and levels are offered at our Campuses and Community Learning Centres. Contact the Campus or Community Learning Centre nearest you to begin your journey towards a better future. infoauroracollege.nt.ca www.auroracollege.nt.ca NWT Literacy Week 2015 September 20-26 Aurora College is committed to literacy at all levels. Our School of Developmental Studies offers part-time and full-time academic upgrading full-time Access Programs and a variety of short term programs. Developmental Studies includes six levels of learning from basic literacy to Grade 12-level courses. Contactoneofour3Campusesor23CommunityLearning Centres to find a course or program that is right for you. To find out how you can participate in Literacy Week visit www.nwtliteracy.ca. To learn more about literacy programs across the NWT visit www.ece.gov.nt.ca. Literacy is important for a strong healthy territory where everyone is able to reach their potential. The Department of Education Culture and Employment ECE would like to congratulate the NWT Literacy Council for 25 years of exceptional work in supporting literacy. The NWT Literacy Council promotes and supports literacy and essential skills in all the official languages of the NWT and ECE is proud to partner with them to help NWT residents improve their literacy. NWT Literacy Week 2015 September21-28 Minister of Education Culture and Employment Jackson Lafferty with students at Kaw Tay Whee School EDUCATION LITERACY WEEK By DALI CARMICHAEL Uncle Gabes Friendship Centre has been recognized with a countrywide award of excellence. The National Association of Friendship Centres NAFC announced the award at the organizations annual general meeting held in Brandon Man. from July 21 to 24. It feels amazing said Amy Harris youth coordinator. All the hard work that weve done throughout the years its certainly paid off. Theres lots of youth that weve helped along the way and other people and its just nice to be recognized for a tonne of work that we do. It was great I always thought we didnt do enough said Tina McNeill executive director and regional representative for the NAFC. We always think we should do more and more and more but then I went to the national AGM meeting and thats where they presented the award. I was really surprised that we won. Like there are eight centres in the NWT In addition to hosting events for outside groups Gabes offers a plethora of services to young and older folks alike everything from cribbage and bingo evenings to coun- seling services bullying workshops drug alcohol and tobacco workshops violence and crime information sessions programs on healthy relationships cultural develop- ment a homework tutor club employment and creative development services. It also sends young people to events outside of the region like the annual Spirit Seekers youth conference in Grande Prairie. Since it was established in 1972 to rep- resent friendship centres emerging across Canada 118 centres and seven provincial or territorial associations have been included under the NAFCs umbrella. The NAFC rec- ognizes one friendship centre from each province and territory with an award of ex- cellence each year. Working with a tight budget In February 2014 NAFC funding was streamlined from four separate programs to two with a total of 43 million per year to be shared with centres across Canada in 2015 and 2016. At the same time a 1.1-mil- lion Cultural Connections for Aboriginal Youth program was cut entirely forcing the closure of the T-Rev Youth Hub evening and weekend program for a time. Now the initiative is up and running again but organizers have had to get creative with their funds. Weredoingthebestwecanwiththemoney we get but we also have the youth doing a lot of fundraising McNeill said. We do fund- raising for the youth we do the T-Rev bingo on Tuesdays at the youth centre and thats extra dollars for them for programming or supplies or whatever is needed. We cant and dont use it for salaries we get money from the government for salaries. Were struggling but were managing in that area. Setting aside money worries for just a mo- mentGabeswillbeinvitingthecommunityto jointhemincelebrationoftheawardforseveral days starting with a community feast on Oct. 10. They will also host a cribbage tournament and a fall fair over the Thanksgiving weekend. Theres going to be entertainment and maybe a little jigging and different activi- ties McNeill noted. Throughout the community weve been very lucky to be helped Harris said explain- ing that generous donations and fundraising efforts from a variety of community organi- zations kept programming going. Thanks to everyone who supports with donations and volunteering. Were always looking for more volunteers if anyone wants to help BoardmembersandvolunteersatGabesFriendshipCentreinFortSmithcelebratetheirAward of Excellence given to the organization by the National Association of Friendship Centres. Fort Smith friendship centre wins national award PhotoPaulineGordon 12 Tuesday September 22 2015 By DALI CARMICHAEL Students from Paul William Kaeser High School took to the land for four days of learning at Sweetgrass Station an an- nual trip that is now a firmly set commu- nity tradition. Taking turns setting out over the course of Sept. 11 to the 17 about 30 Grade 7 and 13 Grade 8 students boated their way to Sweetgrass Landing for several hours before making the 14-kilometre hike to their cabins where they are nestled deep in Wood Buffalo National Park. A staple of the annual event was heavy community involvement according to teacher Nashara Camel. Volunteers regu- larly provide transportation while parent volunteers and Indigenous elders share their time and knowledge in running the camp. Each day was filled with activity as PWK students set out to EDUCATION CULTURE CAMP Grade 7 students from Paul William Kaeser High School prepare for their trek to Sweetgrass Station on the morning of Sept. 11. Wood Buffalo National Park staff volunteers aCameron Sandy-Heron Chris Laviolette and Duncan Sinclair learn how to pluck a duck. The Grade 8 girls head out on a canoeing excursion. Tuesday September 22 2015 13 students and adults alike practiced tradi- tional harvesting learned about the local environment and navigated their way around the park using canoes compases and GPS systems. They also practiced their photography skills shooting elements of nature and de- scribing what they found. The pieces were submitted to astronaut Roberta Bondars annual photography challenge a contest which encourages kids and adults alike to learn about biodiversity by looking through their camera lens. In addition to all of the learning activi- ties the camp is a chance for teachers and students to bond and interact with elders and Canada Parks staff from the community. The event drew national attention this year with a feature about the 2014 excursion in Canadian Geographics September issue. Sweetgrass Station PhotoscourtesyofPWKHighSchool Grade 7 students Devyn Dievert left and Grace Gauthier take a break from the urry of activities to enjoy their natural surroundings. Elders Henry and Eileen Beaver have helped run events at the Sweetgrass culture camp over the last few years. They announced that after this year they would be retiring from the gig. Parent volunteer Jeff Dixon shows Devyn Dievert how to handle a chainsaw.and Grade 8 students celebrate their arrival at Sweetgrass Station. Caribou Legs reaches Parliament Hill in latest cross-country water protection marathon 14 Tuesday September 22 2015 ENVIRONMENT WATER FORT SMITH RESIDENTIAL FALL CLEAN-UP The Towns Residential Fall Clean-up is scheduled for the period of September 29 to October 3 2015 Residents may have large items washers dryers refrigerators etc. and yard work debris collected by the Town - for a cost of 40.00 from the curb side only. Smaller items must be boxedbagged. Brush and willows must be bundled. Trees must be limbed and cut to 4-foot lengths. All items must be placed at the property roadside. No vehicles will be collected however tipping fees at the Landfill are waived for residential customers for the duration of the Fall Clean-up. No Household Hazardous Waste such as propane tanks batteries paint used oils etc. will be collected however we will be collecting household hazardous waste at the Landfill free of charge for the duration of the Fall Clean-up. No construction materials such as demolished buildings or construction sitesprojects at residential locations will be collected. To register please visit or call the Town Office 872-8400 with the following Name Residence Address Materials to be picked up Contact phone numbers and 40 payment. Registrations close at 500 p.m. Friday October 3 2015. By DALI CARMICHAEL Three-and-a-half-months after setting off from Vancouver ultra marathon runner and water protection activist Brad Firth - also known as Caribou Legs - has reached Par- liament Hill in Ottawa. Upon arriving in the countrys capital the Gwichin activist completed a 4400-kilome- tre effort to raise awareness and reinstate protections for some 2.5 million Canadian waterways that lost their coverage in 2012 a result of the federal governments amend- ments to the Navigation Protection Act. Were just trying to raise our voice and get some attention maybe get people to look and go Yeah lets try to get back to protecting the water and get some kind of water strat- egy there he said. On Monday morning Firth completed his mission with a water ceremony on Victoria Island where he was joined by a multitude of regional supporters including members of the AlgonquinTerritory theAssemblyofFirstNa- tions Six Nations Idle No More Ontario and Council of Canadians. Following that he n- ishedhistrekwitharelativelyquick1.5kmjog to the Centennial Flame on Parliament Hill. I am proud to be running with Caribou Legs and to welcome him to Ottawa said Paul Dewar the NDP candidate for the Ot- tawa Centre riding who joined Firth on his last leg. His determination is inspirational. I share his commitment to watershed conser- vation and to improving welfare including access to water in Indigenous communities across Canada. I am running with him to show my support and to congratulate him on his incredible achievement. Throughout his quest Firth promoted the Council of Canadians Pledge2Prot- ect petition addressed to the federal party leaders. The document calls for parties and their MPs to protect the countrys waterways if elected. So far the petition has garnered 14727 signatures. We need people like him who are willing to go the distance to raise awareness of the vulnerability of our lakes and rivers said Maude Barlow national chairperson for the Council of Canadians. The Navigable Wa- ters Protection Act was Canadas oldest piece of legislation ensuring that our waters were for everyone since 1882. Now our waterways are being prioritized for industry. No mat- ter which government gets elected this Oc- tober I urge MPs to not only reinstate but strengthen our environmental legislation. We can do better. While jogging around the country Firth took time to meet with residents and learn about issues with lakes and rivers from Brit- ish Columbia to Ontario. People in Chilliwack and Hope B.C. they have their own water activism going on there. They have a Nestle water bottling plant right there theyre constantly ghting he said. That kind of sparked my eye and I cheered them on. Firth noted he was disappointed to miss the opportunity to speak with residents of Shoal Lake during the Winnipeg Water Walk held on Sept. 12. The march was in support of the Shoal Lake 40 First Nation a water-locked community on the border of Manitoba and Ontario that has been under a boil-water ad- visory for 17 years and without a bridge to the outside world for twice as long. No stranger to environmental activism Firth has previously completed two ultra marathons in an effort to protect the Peel watershed - bordering Yukon and the NWT - from industrial development. The rst trip was a 1200 km excursion from Inuvik to Whitehorse and the second a 3850 km run from Vancouver to Inuvik. From waterways to classrooms One of Firths favourite visits during his latest marathon took place just outside of Ot- tawa where he took an afternoon off to run with the Bishop Smith Catholic High School cross-country team in Pembroke. I showed them cross-country is about having fun by getting muddy getting foot soakers and the last one in buys healthy drinks he said. It was my rst awesome large group of athletic students that I ran with down here. It was a great opportunity sharing my strengths experiences and hopes with them. I explained that if they stick with running throughout their lives it would take them to great heights In an earlier interview with the Journal Firth noted he will be giving his legs a rest while taking a break from his water activism however he looks forward to bringing some running programs to youth in the far North. Ray Zahab is the Wayne Gretzky of ul- trarunning Firth said. Weve talked about doing some projects together and Im look- ing forward to the chats and coming up with ideas involved in running and things like that in the Arctic. I truly believe that everyone is capable of the extraordinary in their lives - running has been a great teacher for me and I am so very proud of Caribou Legs and his awe- some journey Zahab wrote in an email to the Journal. We have spoken briey about Inuvik and I am hoping to meet up with him again very soon to nail down some rm de- tails. Hes a great guy PhotoTsulGraphics Caribou Legs a.k.a. Brad Firth left and his supporters walk from Victoria Island in the Capital region to the Centennial Flame on Sept. 21 in a rally for water protection across Canada. Paddlers follow the path of blue gold from Oka to Inuvik Tuesday September 22 2015 15 SPORTS RECREATION PADDLING TIRE NORTH LTD. HAY RIVER NT X0E 0R8 867 874-2686 TIRENORTHKINGLANDFORD.COM FOR ALL YOUR WINTER TIRE NEEDS Nokian Hakkapeliitta R2 A non-studded winter tire that offers supreme driving comfort and safety. A new tire for drivers who require absolute driving comfort tangible fuel savings and non-studded winter tire technology with the best safety characteristics. BY DALI CARMICHAEL and DON JAQUE Coming soon to a Mackenzie Valley com- munity near you Six stalwart Quebec river runners who call their journey Les Chemins de lor bleu or The blue gold paths are paddling the length of the NWT as the nal leg of a long journey and hope it to make it to Inuvik by Oct. 20. Gone are the 40-kilometre days even the 50-km days now we are looking at 60-km days said Annik Shamilan wistfully. Were on a tight schedule because of the weather its starting to get chilly. Were trying to beat the ice basically. SinceputtinginnearOkaQue.inthespring the group of committed canoers have paddled their way around the country crossing major bodiesofwaterthroughtheOttawaRiverLake SuperiorLakeWinnipegenroutetotheNorth. Their biggest test though may still be ahead of them. After portaging the Slave Rapids they left Fort Smith on Sept. 18 a brisk sunny fall morning. However they are headed into winter weather and face the challenge of fall wind storms. On the day they left Smith there were gale warnings for Great Slave Lake and wind warnings up to 40 km per hour along the length of the Mackenzie Valley. We went from having some fun in the water because we were sweating too much and in one month we started to wear our big coats and have some ice on our stuff in the morning said Julien Bilodeau. So why paddle almost 7000 km across the country and face these upcoming frigid challenges Its about the voyageur route were follow- ing the voyageur route from the beginning its the old pathway to the North and Inuvik was probably the last place Bilodeau explained. Specically they want to follow in the wa- terways of explorer Alexander Mackenzie. Throughout their journey the group said they had been shown kindness from friends and strangers alike everything from sur- prise bottles of scotch to rides across what would otherwise be extensive stretches of portage route. Headstrong they tried to stay true to the voyageur style with most of the group walk- ing in the same steps and paddling the same waters as their ancestors. Were trying to do it by ourselves the most we can thats why were walking the 27 km Bilodeau said taking a small break in his trek from Fort Fitzgerald to Fort Smith to speak with the Journal. To follow the crew as they head north nd them on Facebook at Les Chemins de lor bleu. Four voyageurs trace the route of their ancestors as they portage 27 km from Fort Fitzgerald to Fort Smith. Les voyageurs from left to right Annik Shamlian Julien Bilodeau Jrmie Blair Frederic Dufresne Martin Trahan and Valrie Jolicoeur. PhotoDaliCarmichaelPhotoDonJaque Fort Simpson mobilizes to find bands stolen gear 16 Tuesday September 22 2015 NORTHERNERS MUSIC BY CRAIG GILBERT A new legend for the North has emerged from Fort Simpson. The working title is The Welders Daughter and the Uncle of the Thief. Welders Daughter a longstanding Yellow- knife band originally from Vancouver rode a rollercoaster of emotions from the deepest valley to the highest mountaintop on Sept. 12 starting when they discovered that morning that about 10000 worth of their gear had been stolen overnight. The hardest thing to deal with is that panic lead vocalist Karen Novak said. You cant believe it happened. Then we start think- ing how are we going to pull off this show Stolen from the Fort Simpson recreation centre were two electric guitars a black Ya- maha bass guitar an iPadApple laptop combo the band uses in place of a mixing board and a myriad of other items including a micro- phone headphones memory cards and ca- bles. The list grew as the veteran musicians took stock and set up what they could. The guitars taken were special to the band. One was a numbered Fender Stratocaster pro- totype with a striking custom zebrawood fin- ish the other a white Fender Telecaster. The only thing taken from the drummers station was a flashlight that the band figured the cul- prits used to look around with. When Attila got his guitar back he liter- ally hugged it Novak said. Its one of his favourites. You kind of hunt for your whole life for the instrument that makes your life Welders Daughter guitarist Attila Novak holds his favourite axe a numbered Fender Stratocaster prototype in Fort Simpson Sept. 12. The guitar and about 10000 of other gear was stolen from the towns recreation centre overnight found and returned in time for the show to go on. easier that is easier to play and sounds great. Its a euphoric feeling when you find it. You have more fun and that feeling gets passed on to the audience. ShortlyafterNovakpostedaboutthethefton aFortSimpsonFacebookpagethecommunity mobilized coordinating through text mes- sages and physically combing the town. One lady was going through dumpsters because someone broke into the youth cen- tre and stole an XBox and they found it in a dumpster Novak said. People were looking in ditches and going through the woods. It was a huge effort that paid off and it never would have happened in southern Canada. Within 30 minutes of announcing the gear had been stolen Lindsay Waugh the emcee for the evenings event had offered up four high-end guitars for the band to borrow. By 5 p.m. the bands gear had been re- covered. Fort Simpson RCMP which had called in the G Division forensic unit to help investigate credited the communitys coordination over social media with crack- ing the case. A man just walked in holding two guitar cases and the iPad and said Are these your things I found them in my nephews closet Novak said. So we told him what else was missing and they found out where the rest of the stuff was. They found the bass guitar stuffed under the stage at the recreation centre. The RCMP charged 18 year-old Stephan Sekaya Hardisty with one count each of break enter and in- tent to commit theft over 5000 and under 5000 and one count of possession of break- in tools. A second adult male was diverted to community justice. The charges have not been proven in court. We felt so good doing the show that night Novak said. We wanted to show how pleased we were and how much we appreciated the communitys help. We went a little into over- time but it was OK. There was a lot of love in the room. PhotocourtestofWeldersDaughter Exciting action close scores at NT soccer championships Tuesday September 22 2015 17 SPORTS RECREATION SOCCER Parents and their children are encouraged to fill out a simple Home Fire Safety Checklist. All residents who fill out a checklist can submit it online to be entered to win one of five home fire safety kits that include A combo smokecarbon monoxide alarm An emergency lightUSB device charger Childrens Lego fire station building set You can enter by visiting www.maca.gov.nt.ca or by asking your local fire department for a form. Entry deadline is October 30 2015. Is your home fire safe Do you have working smoke alarms in the right locations 684-115 NN NJ Soccer Tournament Results 1st J.H. Sissons School 2nd Princess Alexandra 3rd cole Borale Boys U9 - U10 1st J.H. Sissons School 2nd Princess Alexandra 1st PWK High School 2nd cole Allain St-Cyr 3rd cole Borale 1st Princess Alexandra 1st St. Patricks Green 2nd Diamond Jenness 3rd PWK High School 1st St. Patricks Green 2nd PWK High School 3rd William MacDonald 1st Deninu 2nd Diamond Jenness 1st Sir John Franklin 2nd St. Patricks White 3rd Diamond Jenness U11 - U12 U13 - U14 1st St. Patricks 2nd Sir John Franklin Seniors Boys AA Boys A Girls BY DON JAQUE The NWT Outdoor Soccer Championships kept the three Hay River soccer pitches lled with action on the weekend as players from at least eight communities descended on the South Slave hub town. There were lots of close games and re- ally good competition said organiser Kelly Webster who after a great deal of work was happy with the way things went. PhotoscourtesyofMarilynMarshall She said the nal game with the senior girls wasparticularlyexciting.Tiedatfulltimeitwent intoovertimethentoashootoutwithveshoot- erseach.Thatsolvednothingsotheteamswent into sudden death where the rst goal wins. In a Yellowknife school duel Sir John Franklin - nallydefeatedcoleSt.Patricktotakethecrown. TheboysnalwassimilarlytightwithDeninu School from Fort Resolution winning over the hometown team from Diamond Jenness. Webster said the tournament is always held the third week in September which is a bit of a challenge. With school just under- way the organized outdoor soccer season is very short plus other teachers are focusing on getting their own school year started. RogerValetheFortSmithcoachandinstruc- tor at PWK High School said the tournament is calledtheNWTchampionshipsbutitismoreof aschoolevent.Hesaidincaseswhereschoolsdo nothaveenoughbodiestomakeupateaminacat- egorytheywillshareatheleteswithotherschools. It is more about participation said Vale. Communities with entries included NDilo there for the rst time Behchoko Fort Liard Fort Simpson Fort Resolution Fort Smith Yellowknife and Hay River plus individual athletes from other communities. Students were housed in school gymnasiums in Hay River during the event. Girls Kaldin Hendrickson of cole Boreal makes a fantastic save against a JBT player while Cash Rewegan and Helen Ivenko McKay take defence. Deninus Dion Norn plays keep away from Diamond Jenness Daniel DaRosa. The cole St. Patricks senior girls take on Sir John Franklin. After a tight game Sir John was victorious. Say it in 25 words or less for only 3.50 Extra words are 20 centseach.Businessclassifieds are 10 for 30 words and 25 centsforeach additionalword. E-mail your advertising to adsnorj.ca or fax it to 872-2754 or call 872-3000 ext. 26 FOR SALE FIREWOOD. Cus- tom cut sizes - split green dry bagged. Wood Gasification Outdoor wood boilers. 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The Standing Committee on Economic De- velopment and Infrastructure issued a state- ment saying it is pleased Industry Tourism and Investment Minister David Ramsay con- rmed discussions would continue into the next assembly. We stress that more work must be done to engage and respond to the publics concerns andtotheseveralconcernsandissuesraisedin theCommitteesResearchSummarytabledon June 4 standing committee chair MLA Rob- ert Hawkins said in a press release. It is our viewthatthepublicislookingforguaranteesof protectionforwaterlandwildlifeandhuman health and has brought a range of insightful views before the government. Ramsay said on Sept. 17 the fracking policy dovetails with the GNWTs work towards an NWT Oil and Gas Strategy. Responsibleresourcedevelopmentinclud- ing oil and gas development is a major com- ponent of the NWT economy and essential to creating a prosperous sustainable future for our residents he said. We recognize that peoplewantmoretimetothinkabouthowour resources are best managed and developed. Draft regulations setting out ling require- ments for proposed oil and gas projects were developed earlierthis year.Between April and June 2015 the departments of ITI Environ- ment and Natural Resources and Lands con- ducted 14 public engagement sessions in 12 communitiesthroughouttheterritoryhearing input from residents businesses and industry about the proposed regulations according to theGNWT.Residentswerealsoabletosubmit comments by mail and email. Hawkins said the committee has stud- ied hydraulic fracturing throughout the 17th Assembly considered potential im- pacts on all regions and residents and recognized the need to continually pur- sue the best possible information. Most recently members undertook a review of the proposed Hydraulic Fracturing Filing Regulations. Thecommitteesnalreportwillbetabledin theupcomingsessionoftheLegislativeAssembly. Asdiscussiononhydraulicfracturingandthe proposedNWTOilandGasStrategyproceeds the committee encourages all residents to re- main involved. Parties may also make written submissions to the committee Hawkins said. Industry ministry extends consultation period on new fracking policy into next Assembly PhotoJoshuaDoubek The GNWT has announced it will extend the input period on its new fracking policy into the next Assembly. 22 Tuesday September 22 2015 ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE www.rmwb.cachampions CITIZEN RECOGNITION PROGRAM 2015 Do you know an outstanding resident who deserves recognition by Mayor and Regional Council Wood Buffalo residents are invited to nominate fellow individuals or groups for their contributions to improve the community. Nominations are open until September 30 2015. Forms are available online and at your local municipal contact office. Visit www.rmwb.cachampions BY DON JAQUE For decades Pat Bobinski and Bruce Green have tended wild rice crops in ponds around Hay River. This year they took Kim Ripati the opera- tions manager of the Northern Farm Training Institute NFTI to experience the harvest which was a bumper crop. I was very surprised at how lush the plants were some of them way over my head said Ripati adding she had to reach for the heads of plants and pull them over the canoe with a paddle they were so tall. She said you can run your hand up the stock in an almost meditative way and the mature rice falls into a container but she said that is the slow way. Bobinski and Green just hit the plants and the ripened seeds fall into the canoe a much faster way. This year the harvest was the best ever. Bobinski told the Journal he rst started seeding NWT ponds and lakes with wild rice over 30 years ago including dugouts along the highway and natural lakes. I seeded a number of lakes and ponds around the north especially near Hay River and Fort Smith. In larger lakes he would do the seeding by oatplane landing on the lake and casting the seed from the pontoons as they moved across the lake. He said the most efcient and fun method was with a friend in a Bea- ver aircraft where he built an aluminum chute that allowed the seeds to be released through the camera hatch. When we were over the lake he would yell Bombs away and I would release the seeds. When oatplane seeding became too costly he resorted to using a canoe to seed every burrow pit and pond he came across. He said a number of years ago Bruce Green got involved in the project with him and kept it going. Green took on the science side of the initiative. He tracks such things as how deep the ponds are the soil type at the bottom of the pond and the other types of aquatic plants present. He has been keeping the data records for years now. Initially the seeds would not mature said Bobinski and they are still hoping to evolve a seed variety that becomes acclimatized to the north. That may have happened this year with mature seeds and a good harvest from the ponds they focus on near Hay River. The operation is still very small-scale. Less than a bucket of rice seeds may be recovered from a pond. Once harvested the seeds need to be prepared very much like coffee beans including a roasting process that removes the husks. Ripati said despite the work involved and limited results the progress is really very exciting. We have homegrown NWT seeds now. We will try growing them as part of the NFTI teaching experience. She said the wild rice growing will be incorporated into their Farm Campus which is a productive farm an old pig farm operation abandoned 20 years ago between Enterprise and Hay River. They will take the experiences and stored-up knowledge of Bobinski and Green and de- velop them. More research needs to be done. One thing to note if you try plant- ing wild rice at a local pond people are not the only beings that love wild rice. A problem Bobinski and Green encountered over the years is that wildlife also really like the lush plants. At one pond where the plant heads were all eaten off a pro- fusion of moose tracks were found along the shore. Ducks and geese also love the plump seeds. Likely any crop in the wild will have a shared harvest. Bombs away After 30 years of seeding lakes and ponds NWT wild rice yields a bumper crop After 30 years as the Johnny Appleseed of wild rice in the NWT Pat Bobinski says 2015 has yielded a bumper crop of the stealthily seeded staple. PhotosKimRipati Humans are not the only ones who love wild rice. Experts say wildlife including moose are attracted to the lush plants. Shortchanged first resource payments dash expectations Tuesday September 22 2015 23 NORTHERNERS MINE RESCUE INTERIOR HEAVY EQUIPMENT Operator School www.IHESCHOOL.com Call Now 1-866-399-3853 Housing Transportation Packages Available NO SIMULATORS JOB ASSISTANCE FOR LIFE NEVER SHARE MACHINES START ANY MONDAY GET TRAINED. GET WORKING. BY CRAIG GILBERT Heading underground for a shift of work is always underpinned with danger. Now the miners at Dominion Diamond Corp.s Ekati Mine can pass through the gates with a little more condence knowing their emergency response team was named overall winner of the underground events at the 12th Biennial National Western Regional Mine Rescue Competition in Fernie BC ear- lier this month. The ERT at the Ekati mine is a dedicated team of employees who put their lives on the line to protect our workforce during emer- gencies Dominion Diamond CEO Brendan Bell said in a press release. These individuals volunteer and devote an extensive amount of time to the team constantly expanding their skills and knowledge to handle real-life situ- ations if called upon. The win earned the team an invitation to the Big Nickel to take part in the Interna- tional Mine Rescue Competition next year in Sudbury. The underground team came out on top with rst-place nishes in four of the seven competitions which included re response ropework and a written exam winning the rst overall championship in the teams history. The surface team also did well nishing with their best-ever showing at the competi- tion which was founded in Fernie in 1993 to establish cooperation and support for mine rescue programs across the country and to work towards standardized rescue training and procedures for underground and surface mining through competition. AsaleaderintheCanadianminingindustry Dominion has a responsibility to have robust emergency response and crisis management capabilitiesBellsaid.OurERTmembershave continuedtoexcelinthisregardandhaveshown they have what it takes to get the job done. Ekati Mine rescue team wins national safety competition The 2015 Dominion Diamond Ekati Corp. mine rescue competition team included Peter Devolder Randy Zdebiak Ryan Erickson Gord Zdyb David Heatheld Branden Wallis Gordon Frowen Don Hebden David Squires Geoff Kinder Tom Smith Darryl Klochko Keith Winship and David English. PhotocourtesyofDominionDiamondCorp. INDUSTRY RESOURCE REVENUES By DALI CARMICHAEL Resource revenues from industrial ac- tivity in the territory wont stretch as far as once hoped. The net scal benet which ows cash into three different investment pockets did not meet early estimates because of smaller-than-expected returns from oil and gas companies. Under the Devolution Agreement up to 25 per cent of the net scal benet is shared with Aboriginal governments while 18.75 per cent is committed to a Heritage Fund. The remainder about 56.25 per cent is used to pay off debt and pay for infrastructure. The GNWT originally projected that Ab- original governments would receive about 15 million from resource revenues. By March the expectation was just 10 million. As it turns out the total payout divided between the nine governments is about 6.3 million. The funds were then allocated to the Aboriginal organizations as of August based on population and regional cost-of- living factors. About 4.7 million was allocated to the Heritage Fund this year while 14.2 million went towards investment and debt. The 2014-15 shares were divvied out using lump sums going forward however those payments will be given on a quarterly basis of revenues received. The Devolution Agreement states that re- source revenues are made up of mineral oil and gas and water revenues including royal- ties licences rentals well-head taxes levies forfeited deposits and rentals subtracting land claim agreement amounts. A total of 72.5 million in royalties were received this year. After subtracting amounts for a one-time Canada share and land claims 50.4 million was left over for resource sharing half of which went to the designated funds. Acho Dene Koe First Nation ....................169621 Deninu Kue First Nation............................214785 Gwichin Tribal Council..............................1066164 Inuvialuit Regional Corporation ...........1636919 Ktodeeche First Nation..........................118706 Northwest Territory Mtis Nation ........565846 Sahtu Secretariat Inc. .................................1204041 Salt River First Nation................................225890 Tcho Government.......................................1094308 Resource revenue sharing 2014-2015 24 Tuesday September 22 2015 NADINE Y. SHOPPING FOR A FORD KINGLAND FORD SALES LTD. 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867-874-7716 Email saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.com www.kinglandsaleshr.com ON NOW NO DISGUISES NEEDED On Now 2015 F-150 SuperCab XLT 4X4 PURCHASE FINANCING FOR 281 3.99 BI-WEEKLY FOR 72 MONTHS WITH 1000 DOWN. 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Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Lorraine Peterson Fleet Manager Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales I3T643 Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Matt M Sales Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing DonneLeeJungkind Vehicle RV Sales LorrainePeterson Fleet Manager 2013 F150 SuperCab XLT 4x4 MSRP 40049 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2561 SALE PRICE 28238 I3T664 20 I3A08 2013 F150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 MSRP 43349 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2957 SALE PRICE 31142 0 down 278 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3T671 0 down 252 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months E-mail us to subscribe to our quarterly newsletter inquiryki KINGLAND FORD SALES L 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867 E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.c Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Lorraine Peterson Fleet Manager Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV 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APR OR OWN FOR ONLY 38451 OFFERS INCLUDE 11098 IN TOTAL PRICE ADJUSTMENTS. FREIGHT AIR TAX INCLUDED. LEASE FOR ONLY 492 2.49APR PER MONTH FOR 24 MONTHS WITH 1000 DOWN PAYMENT. OFFER INCLUDES 3471 IN TOTAL PRICE ADJUSTMENTS AND 1750 FREIGHT AND AIR TAX. THATS LIKE 228BI-WEEKLY FEATURES Canada Winter Package Power Liftgate Rear Parking Aid Sensors SYNC Voice Activated System .... 2015 Escape SE 4WD YOU PAY WHAT WE PAY KINGLAND FORD SALES LTD 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867-874-7716 E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.com Tina Duggan Finance Manager Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Lorraine Peterson Fleet Manager Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales I3T643 Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Matt Morse Sales Leasing Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing DonneLeeJungkind Vehicle RV Sales LorrainePeterson Fleet Manager Tina Melvin Finance Manager 2013 F150 SuperCab XLT 4x4 MSRP 40049 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2561 SALE PRICE 28238 MSRP 58899 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 4513 SALE PRICE 45136f 2013 F-150 SuperCrew Fx4 4x4 I3T664 MSRP 29049 Delivery Allowance 4250 Kingland Discount 1429 SALE PRICE 23370 2013 Focus TITANIUM 0 down 220 5.69 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3A08 2013 F150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 MSRP 43349 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2957 SALE PRICE 31142 0 down 278 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3T671 0 down 252 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months CallTinyToday forPre-approval 1-800-661-0716 E-mail us to subscribe to our quarterly newsletter inquirykinglandford.com 0 down only 399 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months KINGLAND FORD SALES LTD 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867-874-7716 E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.com Tina Duggan Finance Manager Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Lorraine Peterson Fleet Manager Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales I3T643 Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Matt Morse Sales Leasing Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing DonneLeeJungkind Vehicle RV Sales LorrainePeterson Fleet Manager Tina Melvin Finance Manager 2013 F150 SuperCab XLT 4x4 MSRP 40049 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2561 SALE PRICE 28238 MSRP 58899 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 4513 SALE PRICE 45136f 2013 F-150 SuperCrew Fx4 4x4 I3T664 MSRP 29049 Delivery Allowance 4250 Kingland Discount 1429 SALE PRICE 23370 2013 Focus TITANIUM 0 down 220 5.69 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3A08 2013 F150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 MSRP 43349 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2957 SALE PRICE 31142 0 down 278 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3T671 0 down 252 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months CallTinyToday forPre-approval 1-800-661-0716 E-mail us to subscribe to our quarterly newsletter inquirykinglandford.com 0 down only 399 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months KINGLAND FORD SALES LTD 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867-874-7716 E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.com Tina Duggan Finance Manager Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Lorraine Peterson Fleet Manager Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales I3T643 Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Matt Morse Sales Leasing Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing DonneLeeJungkind Vehicle RV Sales LorrainePeterson Fleet Manager Tina Melvin Finance Manager 2013 F150 SuperCab XLT 4x4 MSRP 40049 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2561 SALE PRICE 28238 MSRP 58899 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 4513 SALE PRICE 45136f 2013 F-150 SuperCrew Fx4 4x4 I3T664 MSRP 29049 Delivery Allowance 4250 Kingland Discount 1429 SALE PRICE 23370 2013 Focus TITANIUM 0 down 220 5.69 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3A08 2013 F150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 MSRP 43349 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2957 SALE PRICE 31142 0 down 278 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3T671 0 down 252 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months CallTinyToday forPre-approval 1-800-661-0716 E-mail us to subscribe to our quarterly newsletter inquirykinglandford.com 0 down only 399 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months KINGLAND FORD SALES LTD 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867-874-7716 E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.com Tina Duggan Finance Manager Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Lorraine Peterson Fleet Manager Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales I3T643 Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Matt Morse Sales Leasing Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing DonneLeeJungkind Vehicle RV Sales LorrainePeterson Fleet Manager Tina Melvin Finance Manager 2013 F150 SuperCab XLT 4x4 MSRP 40049 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2561 SALE PRICE 28238 MSRP 58899 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 4513 SALE PRICE 45136f 2013 F-150 SuperCrew Fx4 4x4 I3T664 MSRP 29049 Delivery Allowance 4250 Kingland Discount 1429 SALE PRICE 23370 2013 Focus TITANIUM 0 down 220 5.69 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3A08 2013 F150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 MSRP 43349 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2957 SALE PRICE 31142 0 down 278 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3T671 0 down 252 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months CallTinyToday forPre-approval 1-800-661-0716 E-mail us to subscribe to our quarterly newsletter inquirykinglandford.com 0 down only 399 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months THE 2013S HAVE TO GO Santas not the only one giving things away this December Check out these deals at Kingland in Hay River PLUS get 500to use towards accessories or maintenence plans with every 2013 purchase. 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867-874-7716 E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.com www.kinglandsaleshr.com Tina Melvin Finance Manager Available in most new Ford vehicles with 6-month pre-paid subscription Platinum model shown SE model shown SE model shown NADINE Y. SHOPPING FOR A FORD TASHA M. SHOPPING FOR A FORD Finance Manager Call Tina today for Pre-approval 1-800-661-0716 Vehiclesmaybeshownwithoptionalequipment.Dealermaysellorleaseforless.Limitedtimeoffers.Offersonlyvalidatparticipatingdealers.Retailoffersmaybecancelledorchangedatanytimewithoutnotice.SeeyourFordDealerforcompletedetailsorcalltheFordCustomerRelationshipCentreat1-800-565-3673.ForfactoryordersacustomermayeithertakeadvantageofeligibleraincheckableFordretailcustomerpromotionalincentivesoffersavailableatthetimeofvehiclefactoryorderortimeof vehicledeliverybutnotbothorcombinationsthereof.RetailoffersnotcombinablewithanyCPAGPCorDailyRentalincentivestheCommercialUpfitProgramortheCommercialFleetIncentiveProgramCFIP.FordEmployeePricingEmployeePricingisavailablefromJuly12015toSeptember302015theProgramPeriodonthepurchaseorleaseofmostnew20152016FordvehiclesexcludingallchassiscabstrippedchassisandcutawaybodymodelsF-150RaptorF-650F-750MustangShelby GT500ShelbyGT35050thAnniversaryLimitedEditionMustang.EmployeePricingreferstoA-PlanpricingordinarilyavailabletoFordofCanadaemployeesexcludinganyUniforCAWnegotiatedprograms.Thenewvehiclemustbedeliveredorfactory-orderedduringtheProgramPeriodfromyourparticipatingFordDealer.EmployeePricingisnotcombinablewithCPAGPCCFIPDailyRentalAllowanceandAXZDF-Planprograms.UntilSeptember302015receive10440190333065536 intotalFordEmployeePriceadjustmentswiththepurchaseorleaseofanewMYF-150FocusEscapeFiesta.TotalFordEmployeePriceadjustmentsareacombinationofEmployeePriceadjustmentof4940190323065536anddeliveryallowanceof550001000--allchassiscabstrippedchassiscutawaybodyF-150RaptorMediumTruckMustangBoss302andShelbyGT500excluded.EmployeePriceadjustmentsarenotcombinablewithCPAGPCCFIPDailyRentalAllowanceand AXZDF-Planprograms.Deliveryallowancesarenotcombinablewithanyfleetconsumerincentives.UntilSeptember302015leaseanewMYFordF-150SuperCabXLTforupto36monthsandget3.49APRonapprovedcreditOACfromFordCredit.NotallbuyerswillqualifyforthelowestAPRpayment.LeaseF-150SuperCabXLTwithavalueof34409after2000downpaymentorequivalenttradeinandTotalFordEmployeePriceadjustmentof10440deductedandincludingfreightand airtaxchargesof1800at3.49APRforupto36monthswithanoptionalbuyoutof34409monthlypaymentis522totalleaseobligationis34409interestcostofleasingis3.49APR.TotalFordEmployeePriceadjustmentisacombinationofEmployeePriceadjustmentof4940anddeliveryallowanceof5500.Taxespayableonfullamountofpurchaseprice.TotalFordEmployeePriceadjustmenthasbeendeducted.AdditionalpaymentsrequiredforPPSARDPRMforQuebecregistration securitydepositexceptinQuebecNSFfeeswhereapplicableexcesswearandtearandlatefeesoptionsfreightexceptinQuebecACTaxexceptinQuebecGreenLevyifapplicableandexceptinQuebeclicensefuelfillchargeinsurancedealerPDIexceptinQuebecPPSAiffinancedorleasedamaximumRDPRMfeeof44andthirdpartyservicefeeof4forQuebecifleasedadministrationfeesexceptinQuebecandanyotherapplicableenvironmentalchargesfeesexceptinOntario andQuebecandtaxes.Someconditionsandmileagerestrictionof25000kmfor12monthsapplies.Excesskilometragechargesare12perkmforFiestaFocusC-MaxFusionandEscape16perkmforE-SeriesMustangTaurusTaurus-XEdgeFlexExplorerF-SeriesMKSMKXMKZMKTandTransitConnect20perkmforExpeditionandNavigatorplusapplicabletaxes.ExcesskilometragechargessubjecttochangeexceptinQuebecseeyourlocaldealerfordetails.Allpricesarebasedon ManufacturersSuggestedRetailPrice.Seeleaseofferlegalmarkedwithsymbolformonthlypaymentleaseofferdetails.Comparisonpaymentsareforreferencepurposesonlyandarecalculatedasfollowsthemonthlypaymentisannualizedmultipliedby12andthendividedbythecomparisonperiod26forbi-weekly52forweeklyand365fordaily.Forexample299x1226bi-weeklyperiods13852weeks69365days9.83.UntilSeptember302015receive3.49APRpurchase financingonnew2015FordF-150SuperCabXLTmodelsforupto72monthstoqualifiedretailcustomersonapprovedcreditOACfromFordCredit.Notallbuyerswillqualifyforthelowestinterestrate.Example2015FordF-150SuperCabXLTfor34409after1000downpaymentorequivalenttrade-inandTotalFordEmployeePriceadjustmentof1000deductedandincludingfreightandairtaxchargesof1800purchasefinancedat3.49APRfor72monthsmonthlypaymentis522thesumof twelve12monthlypaymentsdividedby26periodsgivespayeeabi-weeklypaymentof241interestcostofborrowingisAPRof3.49andtotaltoberepaid.TotalFordEmployeePriceadjustmentisacombinationofEmployeePriceadjustmentof4490anddeliveryallowanceof5500.Taxespayableonfullamountofpurchaseprice.TotalFordEmployeePriceadjustmenthasbeendeducted.DownpaymentmayberequiredbasedonapprovedcreditfromFordCredit.Allpurchasefinanceoffersinclude freightandairtaxchargesbutexcludeoptionsfreightexceptinQuebecACTaxexceptinQuebecGreenLevyifapplicableandexceptinQuebeclicensefuelfillchargeinsurancedealerPDIexceptinQuebecPPSAiffinancedorleasedamaximumRDPRMfeeof44andthirdpartyservicefeeof4forQuebecifleasedadministrationfeesexceptinQuebecandanyotherapplicableenvironmentalchargesfeesexceptinOntarioandQuebecandtaxes.AllpricesarebasedonManufacturers SuggestedRetailPrice.PurchaseanewMYF-150FocusEscapeExpeditionfor3832934409232112758348303afterTotalFordEmployeePriceadjustmentof972010440190333065536deducted-acombinationofEmployeePriceadjustmentof57204940190323065536anddeliveryallowanceof4000550001000.Taxespayableonfullamountofpurchaseprice.TotalFordEmployeePriceadjustmenthasbeendeducted.Offerincludeschargesforfreight andairtax1800166517901790butexcludesoptionsfreightexceptinQuebecACTaxexceptinQuebecGreenLevyifapplicableandexceptinQuebeclicensefuelfillchargeinsurancedealerPDIexceptinQuebecPPSAiffinancedorleasedamaximumRDPRMfeeof44andthirdpartyservicefeeof4forQuebecifleasedadministrationfeesexceptinQuebecandanyotherapplicableenvironmentalchargesfeesexceptinOntarioandQuebecandtaxes.Allpricesarebasedon ManufacturersSuggestedRetailPrice.OfferonlyvalidfromAugust12015toSeptember302015theOfferPeriodtoresidentCanadianswithaneligibleCostcomembershiponorbeforeJuly312015.Receive1000towardsthepurchaseorleaseofanew2015and2016wherethemodelisavailableFordexcludingFiestaFocusC-MAXGT350GT500F-150Raptor50thAnniversaryEditionMustangandMediumTruckmodeleachanEligibleVehicle.Limitone1offerpereachEligibleVehicle purchaseorleaseuptoamaximumoftwo2separateEligibleVehiclesalesperCostcoMembershipNumber.OfferistransferabletopersonsdomiciledwithaneligibleCostcomember.ApplicabletaxescalculatedbeforeCAD1000offerisdeducted.2015SiriusCanadaInc.SiriusXMtheSiriusXMlogochannelnamesandlogosaretrademarksofSiriusXMRadioInc.andareusedunderlicence.2015FordMotorCompanyofCanadaLimited.Allrightsreserved. NADINE Y. SHOPPING FOR A FORD NADINE Y. SHOPPING FOR A FORD TOTO FORD EASYEASY TOEASY GET INTO A ITS EASY TO GET INTO A FORD 2015 F-150 SUPERCAB XLT 4X4 241BI-WEEKLYFOR 72 MONTHS WITH 1000 DOWN PAYMENT. OFFER EXCLUDES TAXES. PURCHASE FINANCE FOR ONLY 241 3.49APR BI-WEEKLY FOR 36 MONTHS WITH 2000 DOWN PAYMENT. OFFER EXCLUDES TAXES. LEASE FOR ONLY 522 3.49APRPER WEEK THATS LIKE OFFER INCLUDES FREIGHT AIR TAX. SHARE OUR EMPLOYEE PRICE 34409 10440IN TOTAL PRICE ADJUSTMENTS ITSITSITSITSITSITSITS EASYEASYEASYEASYEASYEASY GET INTO AGET INTO AGET INTO AGET INTO AGET INTO AGET INTO AGET INTO AGET INTO AGET INTO AGET INTO A 2015 F-150 SUPERCAB XLT 4X4 PURCHASE FINANCE FOR ONLY 241 3 49 LEASE FOR ONLY 522 3 49 OFFER INCLUDES FREIGHT AIR TAX. SHARE OUR EMPLOYEE PRICE 34409 10440