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Yellowknifer honoured as remarkable grad Earlier this month Sarah Erasmus received the latest in a string of awards since she opened her apparel business in 2010. See page 7. Hay Rivers tiniest secret is revealed A crop of fairy doors have appeared the woods out- side a Northwest Territories town fascinating residents and visitors. See page 16. DRUMMING UP FUN Lawrie Hobart Memorial Tournament returns to Fort Smith. See pages 8-9. Arena in Fort Smith is even greener than it looks The rst look into the newly renovated arena in Fort Smith reveals a pristine new interior with a green surprise on tap. See page 13. Town wants to capitalize on Arctic tourism boom The Town of Inuvik saw a larger-than-normal rush of tourists last summer and they are hoping for a repeat performance in 2016. See page 11. V IS IT W W W .N O R J.C A A national award winning independent newspaper serving northern Alberta and the Northwest Territories since 1977 1.00 October 21 2015 Vol. 39 No. 25 By CRAIG GILBERT Liberal candidates swept all three territories Oct. 19 upsetting longtime incumbents and helping return the Trudeaus to 24 Sussex Drive with a majority government. Michael McLeod brother of out- going NWT Premier Bob McLeod snatched the Northwest Territories from three-term incumbent New Democrat Dennis Bevington and Hunter Tootoo ousted Conservative cabinet minister Leona Aglukkaq in what was an exciting three-way race for much of the night in Nunavut. Larry Bagnell returned Yukon to the big red tent after four years of Conservative MP Ryan Leef who made headlines early in the epic 78-day campaign by staking out an election sign and placing a woman who was defacing it under citizens arrest. McLeod said before delivering his acceptance speech in Yellowknife his team worked long and hard to take what until last year was called the Western Arctic. Every day the campaign was on we put in long hours knocked on MP-elect Michael McLeod enjoys his win over incumbent Dennis Bevington with daughters Shawna and Robyn along with his wife Joyce and about 100 supporters at Liberal campaign HQ in Yellowknife Monday night. a lot of doors he said. The team was working full-tilt. We took each community very seriously. McLeod said he heard about jobs housing and cost of living while out on the hustings. ThatgoesrightfromYellowknife thebiggestcommunityinourNorth right down to the smallest one. The MP-elect said his three terms as an NWT MLA will help him im- prove relations between the federal government and Aboriginal mu- nicipal and territorial governments. Ive already been getting calls from incumbent ministers and MLAs and new candidates that want to start putting a priority on echoed the commitment in his ac- ceptance speech. Ivebeenincontactwithvirtually all of the Aboriginal governments McLeod said. The Dehcho want to move ahead with their land claims weve heard very loud and clear from the Akaitcho that they want to settle land claims. They want to be able to deal with issues affecting their membership other than just taking part in negotiation. Theyve been at the table for so long they want to get it resolved but we need to have all three governments at the table to have that commitment and make it a priority. McLeod said he wants to be in the mix as roles are handed out in Ottawa and when asked if that means a seat in cabinet he replied hed love to be at the table but wants tobedoingsomethingthatwillhelp the NWT move forward. Bevington conceded to McLeod in person and said Tuesday morn- ing New Democrat MPs would work to make sure the change the Liber- als promised takes place. See Sunny on page 3. Grits sweep North en route to majority He added a Liberal government wouldhelpbycreatingjobsforyoung people and skilled trades workers with infrastructure projects includ- ing housing highways and airports increasing the Northern Residents Deduction and easing the tax bur- den on the middle class. issues so we have a more focused agenda he said. He added the Aboriginal agenda is very important to the Liberal Party noting the campaign pledge to interact with Aboriginal leader- ship on a nation-to-nation basis. PrimeMinister-electJustinTrudeau PhotoBillBraden Every day the campaign was on we put in long hours. We took each community very seriously MP-elect Michael McLeod 2 Wednesday October 21 2015 POLITICS MUNICIPAL ELECTION NEWS BRIEFS Imperial Husky create nationwide fuel network Transport truck drivers are about to start seeing a lot of Esso signs. Fuel giants Husky Energy and Imperial Oil have joined forces announcing they will operate the largest transport fuel stop network in the country with 160 locations. Husky will convert its commercial card- locks co-located Travel Centres and a select number of retail service stations to the Esso brand all of which will remain under Huskys management. Highway 63 twinning 99 per cent complete Travellers from the North enroute to Edmonton tak- ing a shortcut via the winter road to Fort McMurray will enjoy much nicer travel on Highway 63 known also as the Highway of Death due to the high number of fatal accidents on it. Alberta Highways has announced that sev- eral sections of the newly twinned highway are now open a total of 237 kilometres or 99-per-cent of the highway. RCMPrecruitforadvisorycommittee Wood Buffalo residents interested in building a rela- tionship with their local RCMP detachment are invited to join a community advisory committee. It meets once a month at the Wood Buffalo RCMP Detachment in Tim- berlea. Members of the committee include representatives from various multicultural communities school boards business owners students seniors residents and Bylaw Services. If you are interested in becoming a committee member please e-mail the Wood Buffalo Community Policing Coordinator atmelanie.headrcmp-grc.gc.ca or call 780-788-4245. Fort Smith Health Social Services Authority HappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappyHappy Foster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster FamilyFoster 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WeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeekWeek Appreciation Week AppreciationAppreciationAppreciation Week Appreciation Week Appreciation Week AppreciationAppreciationAppreciation Week AppreciationAppreciation Week AppreciationAppreciationAppreciation Week Appreciation Week Appreciation Week AppreciationAppreciationAppreciation Week AppreciationAppreciation Week AppreciationAppreciationAppreciation Week Appreciation Week Appreciation Week AppreciationAppreciationAppreciation Week AppreciationAppreciation Week AppreciationAppreciationAppreciation Week Appreciation Week Appreciation Week AppreciationAppreciationAppreciation Week AppreciationAppreciation Week AppreciationAppreciationAppreciation Week Appreciation Week Appreciation Week AppreciationAppreciationAppreciation Week Appreciation If you are interested in becoming a foster parent please contact Fort Smith Social Services at 867-872-6300. A hundred years from now it will not matter what my bank account was the sort of house I lived in or the kind of car I drove But the world may be different because I was important in the life of a child. -Forest E. Whitcraft Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23Friday October 23rdrdrdrdrdrdrdrdrdrdrdrdrdrdrdrdrdrdrdrdrdrdrdrd from 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pmfrom 200pm - 400pm Join us at Fort Smith Social Services for an open house to celebrate our local foster parents Miss Stache is a sophisticated and cute little lady. Isnt she just precious If you brought her home shed be so happy and give you cuddles. Please leave a message at 872-5543 for details. WESCLEAN NORTHERN SALES LTD. Ph 867 875-5100 Fax 867 875-5155 Avalon Cat Hair - long Size - medium Gender - female Avalon is a very loving and beautiful cat. She is spayed and is up-to-date with all her shots.If you think you have a home for a Avalon please call the shelter at 872-5543. Please leave a message at 872-5543 for details. WESCLEAN NORTHERN SALES LTD. Ph 867 875-5100 Fax 867 875-5155 E-mail infowescleannwt.com web www.wescleannwt.com Avalon Cat Hair - long Size - medium Gender - female Avalon is a very loving and beautiful cat. She is spayed and is up-to-date with all her shots.If you think you have a home for a Avalon please call the shelter at 872-5543. Please leave a message at 872-5543 for details. WESCLEAN NORTHERN SALES LTD. Ph 867 875-5100 Fax 867 875-5155 E-mail infowescleannwt.com web www.wescleannwt.com Avalon Cat Hair - long Size - medium Gender - female Avalon is a very loving and beautiful cat. She is spayed and is up-to-date with all her shots.If you think you have a home for a Avalon please call the shelter at 872-5543. SpayedNeutered Up-to-datewithroutineshots House trained Miss StacheFemaleAdult Black and white mix Looking for a new home By CRAIG GILBERT Yellowknife Mayor Mark Heyck will not have to watch his task force on homeless- ness take shape from the out- side after all. Heyck was one of only two incumbent mayors returned to power in municipal elec- tions held in six Northwest Territories communities concurrently with the fed- eral vote on Oct. 19. He said before the elec- tion he has been working on a hyper-focused mayors task force on homelessness that would have a 150-day time limit for about a year and that he would be glad to continue to be involved if he were to lose the elec- tion to challenger John Himmelman. That was not the case as Heyck cruised to a 4479 to 1411 win earning a second term as the capital citys chief magistrate one he in- tends to spend focusing on the downtown. The broader issue of downtown revitalization is something the current coun- cil has been working on for Open season on mayors in NWT the last three years he said Tuesday morning. The so- cial issues we see downtown are a core component of that revitalization that needs to be addressed but its just one piece. Business incubators rede- velopment opportunities in- centivestoencourageresiden- tial development and faade improvements to businesses are all on the table. Joining him on council is top vote-getter Rebecca Alty along with Adrian Bell Linda Bussey Steve Payne Neils Konge Shauna Mor- gan Rommel Silverio and Julian Morse. Alty Bell Bussey and Konge were in- cumbents. Silverio was the only successful IserveU candidate who had pledged before the election to respect the result of crowd-sourced polls of registered Yellow- knife voters through a new software platform. Marie- Soleil Lacoursiere and Dane Mason fell several hundred votes short of a council seat limiting the inuence of the upstart IserveU system. Heyck called the coun- cillors-elect a good mix of new and old representing a healthy cross-section of the community. I think we have a good group of councillors who want to diversify our local economy Heyck said. Weve been working closely with NWT Tourism. By now ev- eryoneisawareoftheremark- able growth of tourism right around the NWT and in Yel- lowknife. I want to focus on how we can encourage the growth of our tourism infra- structure. We know we have the visitors now do we keep them here longer Heyck attributed his sec- ond mayoral win to the em- phasis he put on being ac- cessible to citizens while on council for three terms and as mayor since 2012. New mayor same council in Hay River It was a different story in Hay River where Councillor Brad Mapes ousted Mayor Andrew Cassidy with a 810 to 540 win. Hay Rivers entire town council will return for the next term with one excep- tion business owner and chamber of commerce vice- president Steve Anderson who lls the spot Mapes left when he entered the may- oral race. All eight council- lors were acclaimed. Cassidy told the Journal days before the election he thought hav- ing veteran councillors re- turn for the next term would bode well for the town as it tackles big-ticket items like the new recreation centre and power distribution. A newer council would need more time to get up to speed he said. Voters in Hay River also gave the town their bless- ing to borrow 15 million of the estimated 24.5 million it will cost to renovate the abovementioned Don Stew- art Recreation Centre in a plebiscite that was on the municipal ballot. The result of 721 for to 372 against with 38 spoiled ballots translates to a strong mandate to get the work underway. Mapes also spoke to the Journal ahead of the vote on Oct. 9 after the nal public information session on the plebiscite. We need to really move forward and get this vote going Mapes said at the time. Change of the guard in Smith Simpson In Fort Smith where coun- cillor Lynn Napier-Buckley ascended to take away in- cumbent Mayor Brad Brakes chance at a second term. Napier-Buckley the pro- gram coordinator of Fort Smith Victim Services de- feated Brake a corrections ofcer in a tight race 574 to 447. ErikaBellAlDumontRon Holtorf Anneliese Kikoak Bob McArthur Rashmi Patel Kevin Smith and Brenda Tuckey were elected councillors. In Fort Simpson Darlene Sibbeston ousted incumbent Mayor Sean Whelly. In Inu- vik Acting Mayor Jim Mc- Donald who took the reins when Floyd Roland resigned to launch his ill-fated bid for the NWT seat in the House of Commons defeated Derek Lindsay to earn his rst full term at the helm. I want to focus on how we can encourage the growth of our tourism infrastructure. We know we have the visitors now how do we keep them here longer Yellowknife Mayor Mark Heyck Post-election GNWT transition process open for first time Wednesday October 21 2015 3 South Slave Regional Wildlife Workshop For more information contact the Regional Biologist at 867-872-6408 Everyone is welcome to attend Environment and Natural Resources invites residents in the South Slave Region to attend the 4th Biannual Regional Wildlife Workshop to discuss priorities for wildlife programs and research. This is an open forum to share information discuss regional wildlife issues and to learn about current and on-going wildlife research and monitoring programs in the South Slave Region. The workshop is being held at Roaring Rapids Hall in Fort Smith on Nov. 3rd Nov. 4th Nov. 5th 1pm-5pm 9am-5pm 9am-1pm Evening session Nov. 3rd 7pm-9pm By CRAIG GILBERT The territorial government hopes to be- come more transparent during transition by involving the public and the media in the process for the first time. SahtuMLAandcaucuschairNormanYakeleya ledtheSpecialCommitteeonTransitionMatters formedseveralmonthsbeforetheendofthe17th Assemblywhichtabledinthehousean80-page report detailing the priorities and goals of the currentclassofMLAsandrecommendationsfor those elected to the 18th Assembly on Nov. 23. Nominations for prospective candidates are open from Oct. 26 until Oct. 30 at 2 p.m. Possibly most significant among the recom- mendations is that the premier and cabinet cre- ateamandateoutliningprioritiesforthenewas- sembly based on presentations from individual MLAs in the house. Yakeleya who served as a cabinetministerduringthe15thAssemblysaid theexecutivecommitteeistowritethemandate behindcloseddoorsbutreturntoregularMLAs forfeedbackonceafirstdrafthasbeencompleted. Usually a transition document like this is puttogetherbytheseniorbureaucratshesaid. Thistimethememberswantedtobeinvolved in the transition process so we as MLAs give the best report to the 18th Assembly. We want to be more in charge of the assembly so its a real big step and sharing this document with the public is a big thing. Concernsovertransparencyoralackthereof with the GNWT have been raised in the past. Outgoing Weledeh MLA Bob Bromley said duringthefinaleight-daysittingofthe17thAs- semblyearlierthismonththatcabinetneither requires nor welcomes our input into matters of state and regular MLAs are an annoyance to be swatted away like a mosquito. Bromley complained regular MLAs found out about major policy decisions like the 50 million given to the NTPC for diesel cost overruns and that Stanton Territorial Hos- pital would be replaced not renovated in the newspaper along with the public. There appears to be clear and deliberate intent to bypass any involvement of MLAs in the decision-making process that the prin- ciples of consensus government define and all of us are sworn to uphold. Shaking up cabinet or not Thecommitteesreportalsoprovidesanori- entation that could be useful to new MLAs on the overall economic climate in the NWT the current decision-making environment faced by lawmakers plus recommendations on the transition process that takes place between legislative assemblies and on where the new crop of MLAs should focus their attention. Yakeleya said it is an important document for the public to be familiar with particularly ahead of the territorial election. The committee did not recommend how the 18th Assembly should attain regional balance within cabinet but it did discuss different ap- proachestotheunwrittenconventionthatensures cabinet represents the entire territory known informally as the 2-2-2 principle two northern MLAs two Yellowknife MLAs and two South Slave MLAs. Some thought Yellowknife should get an extra seat to reflect its share of about half the entire NWT population others supported a 2-2-2-1 policy with one MLA elected to cabinet atlargeinordertoshoreupotherdeficiencies in representation for example more women. In both cases cabinet would then elect a pre- mier in secret from amongst themselves. The transition committee did not discuss the com- panion convention that says the premiership should similarly rotate between NWT regions. Yakeleya said finding the best candidate for the job should trump regional considerations. Our recommendation is to look at the pro- cess he said. If it is the will of the MLAs of the 18th to select the two two and two for cabinet and select the premier at-large from the group of us all 19 MLAs there is a pos- sibility you could get a two-term premier. Priorities for the next assembly The committee suggested the 18th As- sembly focus on five key areas noting be- cause of the long-term nature of the work many priorities would overlap with those of the 17th. Quoting directly from the report in no particular order the suggestions are Reverse the social ills that hold our people down particularly low education levels addictions and poor mental health Strengthenanddiversifyoureconomyinantici- pationofimpendingdiamondmineclosures Complete devolution of land and resources and implement a regulatory system that reflects the values of our residents and partner governments Rein in the increasing cost of living par- ticularly energy housing and food and Plan for and adapt to a changing climate in the North. The report said not every member agreed on their relative importance but setting the priori- ties is a departure from the vision statements of previous assemblies which according to the re- port have tended to be very broad and of lit- tle value to Cabinet or standing committees. Insteadthetransitionreportincludesabout three paragraphs under each priority. Under strengthen and diversify our economy for example the committee recommended that thenewMLAsinvestininfrastructureinorder to open more of the NWT up to exploration. Wecannolongerriskkeepingallofoureggs inonebasketthereportreads.Skilldevelop- mentdiversificationandimprovingthecondi- tions for entrepreneurship and capital invest- ment must continue if we are to meet our goal of increasing the NWT population. The committee also encouraged incoming MLAs to tackle energy rates and pursue the federal government for help on public hous- ing and the cost of basic food items. Every resident business and community is impactedbythehighcostoflivingintheNWT.It isalsoanimpedimenttoattractingnewresidents and is a significant factor for many who leave. Continued from page 1. I think my first reaction is were all happy to see the backside of Stephen Harper Bevington said. The Liberals had a good candidate and a winning cam- paign nationally one that kept growing all the way through. We didnt achieve that. We declined throughout this campaign nationally. Bevington looks forward to spending more time with his seven grandchildren and in his hometown of Fort Smith which he considers one of the finest places to live in the world. The Conservative Party announced Harper would step down as leader before he made his concession speech in Calgary Heritage. The man who helped unite the right and finally let the West in said it was an unbe- lievable honour to serve as prime minister and that his party accepts without hesita- tion that Canadians have elected a Liberal government. We gave everything we had to give and we have no regrets whatsoever he said. Friends how could we We remain citizens of the best country on Earth. The Liberal majority is comprised of 184 seats so many that for the first time since the super-majorities of the Jean Chrtien era there will be government MPs sitting on the Opposition side of the House of Com- mons. The red tide as it quickly became known started with a sweep of the Mari- times and continued with breakthroughs in Quebec and Ontario including domi- nance in riding-rich Montreal and king- maker Toronto where even the ridings of late NDP leader Jack Layton and that of his widow NDP candidate Olivia Chow elected Grits. The Tories maintained a base of support in Alberta that stretched through southern Saskatchewan and Manitoba and reached into southwestern Ontario a Conservative stronghold outside major cities like Lon- don where two ministers of state were de- feated and surprisingly to many pundits into mainland British Columbia where they took 10 seats. Notably the Liberals took two seats each in Edmonton and Calgary where a riding has not gone red since the Trudeau-ma- nia days of 1968. The New Democrats saw their brief time atop the polls in late sum- mer crumble as autumn set in falling from 103 to just 44 seats their base in Quebec eviscerated. In Papineau Trudeau said Canadians had chosen real change. He invoked prime min- ister Wilfrid Laurier by name but not his father Pierre Elliott Trudeau. Sunny ways my friends sunny ways Trudeau said. This my friends is what posi- tive politics can do. He pledged to work with the Conservative Party which becomes Her Majestys Loyal Opposition for the first time since 2006. Conservatives are not our enemies they are our neighbours. POLITICS FEDERAL ELECTION POLITICS TERRITORIAL ELECTION Sunny ways my friends Trudeau beams after election win 4 Wednesday October 21 2015 The Northern Journal is an independent newspaper covering news and events in the western Arctic and northern Alberta. The Northern Journal is published weekly by Cascade Publishing Ltd. Printed at Star Press Inc. Wainwright AB. Publisher................................................................................. Don Jaque 867-872-3000 ext.21 donnorj.ca Editor..................................................................................... Craig Gilbert 867-872-3000 ext.24 newsnorj.ca Reporter....................................................................... Dali Carmichael 867-872-3000 ext.25 reporternorj.ca Comptroller .......................................................Jessica Dell 867-872-3000 ext.20 webnorj.ca Advertising........................................................................... 867-872-3000 ext.26 adsnorj.ca Administration............................................Jeremy Turcotte 867-872-3000 ext.26 adminnorj.ca Production Manager ......................................Sandra Jaque 867-872-3000 ext.22 sandranorj.ca Graphics........................................................Paul Bannister 867-872-3000 ext.27 graphicsnorj.ca Letters to the Editor Policy The Northern Journal welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and include a phone number so the author can be veried. Names will be withheld on request in special circumstances where the reasons are determined to be valid. The Journal reserves the right to edit letters for length libel clarity and taste. Opinions expressed in letters and columns are not necessarily those of the publisher or editor. EDITORIAL LETTER TO THE EDITOR 2013 CCNA BLUE RIBBON CANADIAN COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER AWARD 2013 C M C A AUDITED Advertising Deadlines Display ad deadline is Thursday at 400 p.m. Classied ad deadline is Thursday at 500 p.m. Email adsnorj.ca Subscription Rates Prices include GST. 47.25 in Fort Smith 52.50 elsewhere in Canada 105 in the USA overseas 164.30. The Northern Journal acknowledges the nancial support of the Government of Canada through the Canada Periodical Fund CPF for our publishing activities. Canadians need to build a better tomorrow From chunks of concrete falling from overpasses in Montreal to rottingsewerpipesinsmalltowns everycommunityandeveryurban centre in Canada has serious infrastructure problems. Who would have thought a woman who is a francophone media personality television entertainment reporter yoga instructor and mother of three might become the champion for the causes of indigenous Canadians par- ticularly the grave circumstance of missing and murdered indigenous women but that is likely now that Sophie Grgoire has become the rst lady of Canada. Poised self-possessed and spirited she is a trainedexperiencedjournalistandalsostudied commerce but in her youth was aficted with what she publicly acknowledges was mental illness and addiction. She is now a formidable ghterforavarietyofcausesincludingwomens rights around the world and is a strong pro- ponent of resolving the many issues that face First Nation Inuit and Mtis Canadians. Her husband the new prime minister has prom- ised that the issues of indigenous Canadians will be a priority but he will be a busy man in the coming months xing the economy and reshapingCanadasimageattheupcomingcli- mate change conference in Paris not to men- tion re-conguring the national government. It is usual for rst ladies to take on a cause. Grgoire has the power and desire plus there are a record 10 indigenous MPs eight Liberal two NDP to work with to nally resolve the burden of shame that plagues Canada. Except for the Conservative core of 30 per centofthepopulationmostCanadianswanted achangeofgovernmentinordertoreturnCan- ada to what it was prior to the last decade - a caring positive country that led the world in causes of justice equality and peace. The NDP and Liberals both liberal democratic parties with similar policies and solutions had an equal shot at delivering that solution. Cana- dians were fortunate to have the luxury of two options and a record 78-day long campaign in which to make up their minds. Which one would be the better choice It mainly came down to leadership. Justin Trudeaus charis- matic promise of hope resonated striking an emotional chord across the country. Two issues were critical in Trudeaus win in this watershed election and will also likely be thetoughestchallengesforthenewgovernment. ThesenatewasStephenHarpersAchillesheel. The scandal with Mike Duffy and other ills of theSenateplaguedHarperthroughouttheearly stages of the campaign setting the tone for the rest of it. Harper championed a reformed elected Senate long before he became prime minister but he never acted on it. Instead he createdapartisanConservativemajorityinthe upperhouseandrendereditredundant.Thomas Mulcairs solution was to eliminate the Senate completely but although Canadians wanted a wholesale change in the ruling party they are leeryoftheideaofdismantlingpartsofgovern- mentandthequagmireofconstitutionalwran- gling that would certainly result. Further the upper house is there for a reason and Mulcair did not propose an alternative. The only ray of hope in repairing the broken Senate came from Trudeau. He eliminated partisanship on his side by cutting loose Liberal senators from hiscaucus.PartisanpoliticsfracturetheHouse of Commons too. Get rid of the bitter rival- ries by changing the way things are done and all aspects of Canadian government could im- prove. Trudeau was on to a possible solution butitneedsalotofworkonallsidestosucceed. Anotherkeyissuewastheneedforactionon aging infrastructure across the country. That had been at the back of the minds of Canadi- ans for a long time. From chunks of concrete falling from overpasses in Montreal to rotting sewer pipes in small towns every community and every urban centre in Canada has serious infrastructureproblems.Fixingthingslikethat createsjobs.Committingtogoingintodecitto improveinfrastructurewasacourageousgamble but what Canadians like as much as courage is sensible solutions and right now the economy needs stimulus not restraint to get it going. Again Trudeau demonstrated smart politics. To be the best on the world stage which is what Canadians want we also have to be forward looking. Traditionally Liberal gov- ernments in Canada straddle the middle and borrow from the left while governing from theright.Thesuccessofthesocialdemocratic governments of Scandinavia are too obvious to ignore. In spite of expensive programs like free education and extraordinary benets for workers and the accompanying higher taxes the standard of living and the quality of life in those countries is consistently the very best of all nations and their economies are thriving. They consistently come up with intelligent yet common sense solutions. For example imper- atives such as climate change and getting rid of waste are accomplished at once by gener- ating electricity from garbage. Then there is the example of Norways heritage fund with over a trillion dollars stashed away from oil revenues. Copying success is wise. Canada is a great country but it could do a lot better. If we are ever to take our place as a world leader Canada needs to be smart innovative and make better choices. Assembly of First Nations AFN Na- tional Chief Perry Bellegarde congratu- lated newly-elected Prime Minister Jus- tin Trudeau and said Tuesday that he is looking forward to immediate action and working together on a comprehensive stra- tegic plan to close the gap in the quality of life between First Nations people and Canadians. We welcome the new federal government and congratulate Prime Minister Trudeau the Liberal Party and all members of Parlia- ment said AFN National Chief Perry Belle- garde. First Nations are ready to move. The Liberals put out a vision for real change. The prime minister spoke in his victory speech about a renewed nation-to-nation relation- ship that respects rights and honours treaties. We are ready to start working now on those terms to close the gap together and build a stronger country for all of us. Bellegarde said that the Liberal Party plat- form included commitments to work on a new approach to First Nations education a new scal relationship an inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous women and girls healthier communities and a new nation- to-nation relationship based on partnership and respect. The National Chief will meet immediately with Prime Minister Trudeau on action for the rst 100 days and a strategic approach based on the AFN plan Closing the Gap 2015 Federal Election Priorities for First Nations and Canada released in early September. I acknowledge and hold up First Nations citizens for participating in this election and congratulate all the indigenous candidates Bellegarde said. I look forward to working with all elected parliamentarians on the ur- gent and important work of reconciliation and closing the gap. There is more information on First Nation priorities and Closing the Gap in quality of life between First Nations people and Cana- dians available online at httpwww.afn.ca uploadslesclosing-the-gap.pdf The Assembly of First Nations is the na- tional organization representing First Na- tion citizens in Canada. National chief wants immediate action on First Nations quality of life Check out next weeks issue for an update on one of Fort Smiths most successful artists Richard Van Camp who still plans to lm movies based on his graphic novels Blanket of Butteries and Three Feathers depicted above. Wednesday October 21 2015 5 COLUMNS 15 Years Ago... Paulette sharpens his skills One of the hardest-working hockey players to come out of Fort Smith is making a name for himself at the Banff Hockey Academy in Alberta. Geronimo Paulette 18 is doing his Grade 12 at the Academy while he hones his hockey skills seven days a week. Issue October 17 2000 20 Years Ago... Election results on the Internet Elections Canada is going high-tech this year making the 1995 NWT election results available on the Inter- net. Chief Electoral Ofcer Jean-Pierre Kingsley says Elections Canada and the NWT Legislative Assembly will post the results of each northern riding on the In- ternet for one month after the election to help publicize results across the North and the nation. Issue October 17 1995 30 Years Ago... Compulsory education meets opposition The amendment that would put teeth into compulsory school attendance legislation met with some opposition when Education Minister Dennis Patterson met with community leaders in Fort Smith last week. Chief Ray- mond Beaver spoke out against the amendment. Band members who cant afford to keep their kids in school certainly cant afford to pay nes he said. Issue October 17 1985 ARCHIVES Northern Journal 2015 Join us online Like Northern Journal on Facebook and get the weekly news delivered to your feed FACEBOOK FEEDBACK A pair of all candidates meetings a.k.a. debates in Yellowknife gave interested voters in the capital and across the NWT a chance to hear from their federal candidates last week. Yellowknife forums let NWT voters hear directly from MP candidates Ron Gwynne Disgusting Conservatives. Cant even nd their way to a forum but you can be sure they know where to nd their OBSCENE pay cheques each month....150000 a year...over 12000 a month to hide... William Mercredi remembered as a friend athlete 30 people like this. By DAWN KOSTELNIK PierreElliottTrudeauisthe Prime Minister of Canada. He will be doing a tour of the Arctic. The buzz around here is that he may be coming to CoppermineNWTforavisit. Nothing has been conrmed everyoneisinatizzy.Wemust do something special for the Prime Minister of Canada. Whatdoyouthinkthatpeople fromtheOutsidewanttosee when they travel to the East- ern Arctic Why polar bears of course. They are known White Girl Nanurluk super bear as Nanook in this area that is what they are called in the language of the Inuit. We have no polar bears at least not on a regular basis likeChurchillManitoba.They can conjure up the big Spirit Bears on demand there. How cananyonecompetewiththat Truth be told we are really happy not to have the giant white bears hanging around waiting to eat us or the dogs. I cant imagine bumping into one in a white out it would be a big bump with bad con- sequences. Biting dogs are enough to deal with. A few years ago a hunter travelled out on the sea ice to hunt seals. His family waited forhimtocomehomeastorm blew in and he is late. Being a few days late after a storm is usualheisstillnothomeafter aweek. Itistime. Hisfriends andhissongatherandforma search party to look for him. Hehasbeenoutontheseaice alonefartoolong. Theytravel fortwodaysthehuntingisnot good thisyearthehunterhas to go far-r-r away to look for seals. Nothing nothing he goesway-y-youtder. Alittle black dot on the frozen white ocean is all he is. Looklook Anarmpoints outdirectionjerkingbackand forth in excitement there Anoverloadedkomatikgrows largeinsizeastheyapproach the skidoo is still attached to the sled. Peter T. Peter T. where are you There is no answer in the still and empty spacenotevenanechothere isnothingforavoicetobounce offof. Voicescarryonandes- capeovertheiceandsnowand dropdownintoRussiatovisit. Twoskidooswiththreemen have travelled long to find their friend and father. Both skidoos sit beside the heavy komatik. Wind has drifted snow up against the sled rails and along the sides of the de- serted skidoo they have not moved for a long time. There arenotracksinthesnow.Days backthefrozenbrushofwind andweathererasedanytracks ofman.Itisgettingdarkthey needtomakecampbeforenight dropshardontopofthemwith its solid heavy black. To be continued. www.thewhitegirl.ca By MIKE BRADSHAW Executive director NWT Chamber of Commerce TheDepartmentofEnviron- ment and Natural Resources has hit a new low in strategic thinking with its Draft Con- servationActionPlan.ENRis proposing that as much as 40 percentoflandintheterritory be set aside for conservation. BycomparisonCanadascom- mitmentinternationallyisfor 17percentofthenationalland masstobedesignatedascon- servation areas. What are they thinking askedKevinDieboldPresident oftheNWTChamberofCom- merce. At a time when were struggling to attract resource investmentweresendingpre- cisely the wrong signals. NWT has a questionable reputation already which is why exploration investment has continued to fall over the past seven years from a high of 200 million in 2007 to a projectedlowoflessthan44 million in 2015. Sustaining and growing mining requires healthy exploration. For the most part exploring for and nding a mine is like looking for a needle in a hay stack. The Holy Grail for explo- ration is land access and as soon as you start to tinker with access you run the risk of ruining what credibility we may still have. One depart- mentsayswereopenforbusi- ness and ENR slams the door shut said Diebold. Besides weve already got one-third of the territory on lock down. According to the Mining Recorders Ofce 32 percent of the NWT is off limits to staking and exploration.That gureincludeslandforparks interimlandclaimwithdraw- als and protected areas. Once land claims are settled and land claim withdrawals are removed the Conservation Action Plan would be looking for additional areas to alien- ate from development. Putting a fence up around morelandisaseriousimpedi- ment and mining investors around the world are already staying away from the NWT in droves said Diebold. Annually the Fraser Insti- tutesurveysglobalminingex- ecutives to produce an over- all Investment Attractiveness Index based not only on a re- gions geological attractive- ness but on regulatory and policy factors which affect investment Policy Percep- tion Index or PPI. While the NWT continu- ously ranks high in its geo- logical potential it continues to lose in attractiveness be- cause of such factors as oner- ous regulations unsettled land claims and uncertainty over land access. The 2014 survey ranked Ireland as the top-rated juris- diction for policy factors with a score of 96.0. Finland and Alberta follow closely both 94.7 tied at second. In total ve Canadian ju- risdictions nished with top 10 PPI ratings world-wide. The NWT had a PPI rat- ing of 63.96 the lowest in the country. Even countries like Botswana and Namibia nishedhigherthantheNWT in PPI rankings. Investment goes where it cangrow.Itgoeswhereinves- tors sense policy certainty. This latest announcement does exactly the opposite it creates another layer of uncertainty said Diebold. The NWT is at a cross- roads. We have serious is- sues and we need serious minded people to resolve them he said. In a recent Business Issues andPrioritiessurveyconducted bytheNWTChamberofCom- mercerespondentswereasked about their condence in the economy. Over the next 12 months 65.3 percent feel the economywilldeclinewhileonly 3 percent feel it will improve. Over the next 36 months 52.8 percent feel it will continue to declineandonly21percentfeel it will improve. These are telling results. Without business condence and investment who will pro- vide jobs How will govern- ments raise more tax revenue to pay for new water treat- ment plants health care or municipal and territorial in- frastructure asks Diebold. Were already dead last in the country as a resource in- vestment destination. When are we going to end the ab- surdity of shutting out in- vestment and begin building some prosperity Draft conservation action plan absurd 6 Wednesday October 21 2015 ENVIRONMENT WATER supports the small businesses of High Level District the lifeblood of our community Find the business youre looking for on our website at www.highlevelchamber.com supports the small businesses of High Level District the lifeblood of our community Find the business youre looking for on our website at www.highlevelchamber.com By DALI CARMICHAEL Its an old saying that whisky is for drink- ing and water is for ghting over and I think weve proven with these agreements that it doesnt have to be that way that we truly can collaborate in the best interests of the people who live in our territories. British Columbia Environment Minister Mary Polak made this statement in Vancou- ver on Oct. 15 shortly after signing a new Transboundary Water Management Agree- ment with Northwest Territories Minister of Environment and Natural Resources Michael Miltenberger. The bilateral agreement is the second of its kind with a similar document signed between the GNWT and Alberta in March of this year. Whats so unique about this and the Al- berta agreement that we signed is that they are the only two functioning agreements in the world where the water - where the aquatic ecosystem - is identied rst Miltenberger said. In this case 85-90 per cent of the water is going to stay in the basin to make sure that the basin can thrive and survive and we rec- ognize the ecosystem needs leaving plenty of room for human use. Specically the agreement addresses the shared waters of the Liard and Petitot Basins GNWT B.C. sign water management agreement British Columbia Environment Minister Mary Polak and Northwest Territories Minister of Environment and Natural Resources Michael Miltenberger also minister of finance sign an agreement to protect the source waters of the entire Mackenzie River system in Vancouver Oct. 15. PhotoscourtesyoftheGNWT located in northeastern B.C. and bordering on the NWT. However both ministers noted its benets would be felt downstream through the tributaries into the Peace-Athabasca Delta coursing through the Slave River and towards the Beaufort Delta - the full breadth of the Mackenzie watershed which covers about 20 per cent of Canadas landmass. We are incorporating many best prac- tices in water management protecting our ecosystems economies and the interests of citizens and First Nations communities Polak said. The involvement of the Fort Nel- son First Nation has been and continues to be integral to informing our objectives and our approaches. She said the agreement is a mutually ben- ecial respectful partnership that formally recognizes and respects our laws regulations plans policies environmental protection and economic opportunities. When presenting the agreement in the Legislative Assembly of the NWT on Oct. 8 Miltenberger indicated the document had also been shaped by the input of Aboriginal governments in the Northwest Territories. The agreement addresses the concern of future upstream development in British Co- lumbia as well as responds to environmen- tal emergencies and their potential effects on water quality quantity and biological el- ements of our shared aquatic ecosystems he told the sitting assembly. Polak said the deal works hand-in-hand with her provinces Water Sustainability Act which received Royal Assent in May 2014. What youll see is an overarching plan to manage together since these river sys- tems cross our borders she said. I dont think youll see any dramatic change with industry because they are already being brought into a much greater focus on water use. Were seeing for example in the northeast of B.C. significant efforts on the part of major oil and gas companies to re-use water. Shell has a major rescue project Dawson Creek so on and so forth. I think industry is already responding to the changing attitudes around water and sustainability. A boon for the 17th Assembly Securing water management and pro- tection agreements has been a top politi- cal concern for the 17th Assembly of the GNWT. Its very important for us to sign this Miltenberger said noting the writ for the territorial election is looming. I thank the minister for honouring her commitment of a few months back to get this done before we in fact left office because this is a crit- ical piece of work for us and it will help us collectively better manage the Mackenzie River Basin. Mounting environmental concerns have also driven the need for developing and of- ciating these transboundary agreements. We share the enormous pressures on water Miltenberger said. Weve watched as maybe you have what happens with your re seasons - our re seasons - record-breaking drought that weve never had before water levels that are all-time lows rain that has stopped coming so these agreements are very very critical to us and weve worked very hard to get them done. The new legislation builds on the Macken- zie River Basin Transboundary Waters Mas- ter Agreement signed by the governments of Canada British Columbia Alberta Sas- katchewan Yukon and the Northwest Ter- ritories in 1997. Polak indicated her government is in the process of establishing a similar agreement with Alberta and Yukon. Miltenberger said he is also in discussions with Yukon to renew its bilateral agreement established in 2002 and is building new agreements with Nuna- vut and Saskatchewan. Advertising solutions Book design Brochures posters Business cardsStationery Invitations custom design Logo design Marketing solutions Photography Promo material Signs Banners Stickers Magnets Wedding Party favours Contact Cascade Graphics at 867 872-3000 or graphicsnorj.ca 207 McDougal Rd Fort Smith NT We offer a range of custom design services that include cascade graphics Successful proud Yellowknifer Erasmus honoured Wednesday October 21 2015 7 SMALL BUSINESS WEEK The Department of Industry Tourism Investment celebrates Power up your business. Invest. Innovate. Grow. Starting a business in the Northwest Territories We can help... Support for Entrepreneurs Economic Development Funding programs created by the Department of Industry Tourism Investment each of the SEED Policy Programs is geared to providingbasic contributions for starting your businessimproving capacity or skills or helping small communities to expand economically. BUSINESS SUPPORT Applicants under this category are eligible for up to 15000. This category is for start-up funding capital assistance operational support and market product development. SECTOR SUPPORT This new approach provides a borrowing incentive up to 15000 a year for designated sectors interest reduction for up to 2 years. For sector researchorinvestigationofnewopportunitiesthereisassistanceavailable up to 25000. COMMUNITY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT This program provides support of up to 25000 for a range of broad based community economic development initiatives. MICRO BUSINESS This element of the SEED policy is meant to replace Grants to Small Business with contributions of up to 5000 for selfemployment activitiesaimedattraditionaleconomyartsfilmandothersimilaractivities. INVESTING IN PEOPLE BUSINESS AND OUR FUTURE The Department of Industry Tourism and Investment works in partnership with others to provide quality programs and services that promote and support Northwest Territories economic pros- perity and community self-reliance. For further information on any or all of these exciting programs please contact your local EDO at 872-6435 or visit our website at www.iti.gov.nt.ca. BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE NETWORKING Where business trip costs exceeds 1500 assistance may be provided to a maximum of 3000. Each applicant must contribute a minimum of 1000 towards the eligible costs of each trip. SMALL BUSINESS WEEK OCTOBER 1824 2015 Business Administration Certificate and Diploma Programs teach skills that are highly transferable and in demand by government private industry and non-profit organizations The Northern Leadership Development Program prepares employed front-line workers to advance to more senior positions in their companiesorganizations Quality Business Education with a uniquely northern perspective Going into business for yourself is a challenging and rewarding venture. Aurora College salutes the many entrepreneurs who work tirelessly to provide vital services to our many communities. www.auroracollege.nt.ca Interested in becoming a small business owner Learn the skills you need at Aurora College. Small Business Week October 19-23 For program information check out www.auroracollege.nt.ca Aurora College Celebrates By CRAIG GILBERT RunninganapparelbusinessinYellowknife ts Sarah Erasmus like a glove. Her mind was already generating business ideas before she graduated from the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology SAIT in Cal- gary in 2010. That idea to create t-shirts for the Aborigi- nal National Games has mushroomed into Erasmus Apparel and a shop that employed as many as eight people during the busy season earlier in the year. Now that she has more than 60000 units soldmostofthemarticlesofclothingheralma mater has recognized her as its Outstanding YoungAlumnifor2015.Thenewestawardwill have to share space in her trophy case with a pair of Peoples Choice Awards from Up Here magazines Frozen Globe Awards 2012 and theYellowknifeChamberofCommerce2014 as well as an Economic Developer of the Year honourfromtheCouncilfortheAdvancement of Native Development Ofcers in 2013. Erasmus Apparel lled a niche for fashions that both celebrated Yellowknife and were for lack of better terms stylish and cool. So glad you made these again happy cus- tomerChristaDomchekpostedontheErasmus Apparel Facebook page referring to a sweater with sayings about the North on the back. I have a collared one with no hood. I wear it ALL the time. Erasmus grew up with only a couple of op- tionsintermsofclothingshopsinYellowknife where kids tended to wear one of only a hand- ful of outt combinations available to them. Sarah Erasmus has sold more than 60000 items mostly clothing through her ve-year-old Yellowknife shop Erasmus Apparel. PhotocourtesyofSarahErasmus I love t-shirts I love going through vintage shopslookingforthingsnooneelsehasIliketo haveuniquestuffErasmusexplained.People intheNorthdonthavealotofoptionstoshop and I wanted to have something different that represented the North. Erasmus who is stoked about the latest awardkeepshershopbusywithamixofmar- keting customer appreciation and customer engagement. A happy customer wearing one of her shirts is a walking billboard but spon- soring teams and athletes donating clothes to non-protsandsupportingcharitiesincluding KidSport and the Stanton Territorial Hospital Foundation contributes to Yellowknifes so- cial fabric while getting her companys name out there. ErasmusApparelisalsooneofthemorethan 200 members of the Yellowknife Chamber of Commerce which celebrated Small Business Week with a series of free seminars on how to launch and maintain a business. Were only successful because the com- munity supports us she said. Its important to give back. Were always engaging with our customers too its so important. We use so- cial media and sponsor events around town. Erasmus is not immune to the relatively high turnover rates among retail and ser- vice businesses in Yellowknife. Her staff has swelled to as many as eight during the bus- ier summer season and managing workers takes a new set of skills separate from the creativity behind her brand. Havingemployeesisoneofthebiggestchal- lenges I have for sure she said. I pay them to be there so I have to make sure theres work to doandtheyredoingtheworkcorrectly.Iknow a lot of other businesses have struggled its a tough market to compete in when they can go workforthegovernmentfor30anhour.Weve been growing each year though so its a good problem to have. Asked what advice she has for prospective entrepreneurs Erasmus said its a lot of work but there is help out there. Alotofpeoplesitbackandwaitfortheright timebutthereneverreallyisarighttimeshe said and being a new business there are a lot of options grants and programs out there. The GNWT Business Development and In- vestment Corporation has a lot of options and the Industry Tourism and Investment Department does too. When youre starting every little bit helps and the support system is great in the North. 8 Wednesday October 21 2015 Lawrie Hobart Memorial Tournament senior results 1st cole St. Patrick 2nd Chief Jimmy Bruneau 3rd Sir John Franklin Women U15 1st Sir John Franklin 2nd cole Allain St-Cyr 3rd PWK High School 1st PWK High School 2nd Sir John Franklin 3rd Diamond Jenness 1st Sir John Franklin 2nd cole St. Patrick 3rd Diamond Jenness U19 Men Yellowknifes Sir John Franklin Falcons took gold in both the U15 men division above and the U19 men division. We will now have an extra day at the beginning of each week. To serve you better... The NorTherN JourNal publicaTioN day is moviNg from Tuesday to Wednesday each week. Wednesday October 21 2015 9 Eighth Lawrie Hobart invitational fills Fort Smith SPORTS RECREATION VOLLEYBALL By CRAIG GILBERT Dozens of teams hundreds of players and thousands of dollars flowed into Fort Smith as the former PWK Invitational Volleyball Tournament rolled into town for four days of action. The tournament has been running as the Lawrie Hobart Invitational Tournament for the past eight years but has a quarter- century of history that stretches farther back than Paul W. Kaeser High School principal Al Karasiuks 20-year career in education in Fort Smith. The tournaments namesake was a long- serving educator in Fort Smith who was as dedicated to his students recreational oppor- tunities as he was to their academics. Lawriewasoneofthepeoplewhostartedit in the first place and his sport was volleyball Karasiuk said. There were 44 teams registered last year one more than in 2014 bringing more than 450 players to the high school and the towns recreationcentretocompeteinfouragegroups for players from Grade 67 to U-19.The games started on Thursday afternoon continued to the opening ceremonies Friday night and wrappedupwithgoldmedalgamesonSunday. As always the teens flocked to local busi- nesses including Berros Rapid Convenience and the Rusty Raven their pockets stuffed with cash. A steady lineup of about 10 teens at theconveniencestoreonFridaynightseemed to be looking for excuses to spend their walk- ing money. Fort Smith Chamber of Commerce presi- dent Janie Hobart who volunteers annually at the tournament dedicated to her late hus- band said the tournament brings in as much as 100000 of sports tourism revenue to the community each year. The businesses support the recreational teams so much she said in 2014. We really appreciate the opportunity to give back. Many of the more than 450 athletes taking part in the tournament were drummed in to the opening ceremonies held at the recreation complex Friday night. A Sir John Franklin Falcon takes flight during round-robin action on Friday. PhotosPaulBannisterandCraigGilbert A total of 44 teams registered for the tournament one more than in 2014. The competition was fierce at the recreation centre where the senior teams played. Hay River takes shop local effect seriously 10 Wednesday October 21 2015 SMALL BUSINESS WEEK www.averycooper.com Avery Cooper Co. Ltd. Certified General aCCountants 4918-50th St. Laurentian Bldg. Box 1620 Yellowknife NT X1A 2P2 T 867.873.3441 F 867.873.2353 Toll-Free 1.800.661.0787 Lack Experience Rely on ours during small business week. Advising Northerners since 1969. You have worked hardto make your business a success. Come talk to us at Norland Insurance about home auto business and car insurance. So you can focus on your business. Having the right insurance is important to protect it. Speak to an agent today 62 Woodland Dr. 105 Hay River NT X0E 1G1 Phone 867-874-2101 Fax 867-874-3386 Insurance Specialist By CRAIG GILBERT In Hay River staying tuned into the com- munity is just good business. The town of 3500 is full of smart people who understand the value of giving back ac- cording to Steven Anderson owner of a num- ber of businesses and the vice-president of the Hay River Chamber of Commerce. The chamber is proud to have more than 110 members made of local businesses that are part of the community he said adding that throughout Small Business Week the chamber highlighted members by advertis- ing them on their powered billboard and con- gratulating them on their success. We have a very progressive community. Weve got a lot of smart people in town who are business- oriented and work hard. At or near the front of those business brains is the idea that shopping local is good for the entire community. Several municipali- ties and chambers of commerce have pub- lished studies on the bouncing buck effect or the benet of buying local. According to one group in Greater Victoria B.C. for every 100 spent in local stores 68 stays in the community. That compares to only 43 for stores based elsewhere. The exact gures uctuate from place to place across the country and have not been worked out for Hay River but in a small north- ern town the effect can be pronounced. An- derson said many communities in the South Slave are competing with each other and northern Alberta for the travelling shopper. The vice president of the Hay River Chamber of Commerce says buying local is the best way to support business-led charitable programs. Othercommunitieshavesimilarchallenges in terms of drawing people in Anderson ex- plained. People here go to High Level people in High Level go to Grande Prairie who go to Peace River who go to Edmonton. There is the get-out-of-town thing but if you shop out every weekend is that supporting your local community Hay River businesses employ Hay River people and both pay Hay River taxes. Seven of them have banded together to offer Cham- ber Coins. If a company employs 5 10 even 30 people that money is being reinvested and lters down. While those economic benets are trick- ling down from the top several businesses are working from the grassroots up. After donating 500 the companies deliver milk to more than 250 students at three Hay River area schools once a week throughout the school year. That program alone is an 8000 touch and were looking at ways to increase it to ensure kids have a healthy choice to help build a strong body and mind he said. The only way to support that is to shop in the commu- nity where youre at. He was quick to point out the donation came from customers who agreed to round up their purchases to the next dollar more than the store itself but Andersons own Super-A store recently facilitated a 9620 donation to Lights On which provides a healthy safe and active place for youth and teens to go on the weekend. It was more than double what a round-up for Lights On collected in 2013. Its just tremendous Anderson said of his customers many of whom offered to add 5 or 10 to their donation. It gives you a nice warm feeling when you see people re- ally care about it.Filephoto Inuvik moves to capitalize on big 2015 tourist season Wednesday October 21 2015 11 SMALL BUSINESS WEEK www.pelicanrapidsinn.com Pelican Rapids Inn 152 McDougal Road Fort Smith NT Tel 867-872-2789 Toll Free 1-877-362-4205 Fax 867-872-4727 THE BLUE ROOM AND THE AURORA ROOM AT THE PELICAN RAPIDS INN IN FORT SMITH are available for events throughout the year. Meetings seminars training private parties and corporate gatherings. The latest audiovisual and teleconferencing equipment is available. Celebrating Small Business Week By CRAIG GILBERT Opportunities must be seized north of the Arctic Circle especially by towns expecting at growth for the near future. The town of Inuvik has one in front of it and administrators are working to gure out how to capitalize on the surge of tourists who visited last summer. Tourism is a big thing here SAO Grant Hood said. There denitely was a noticeable increase this year. It was also a big topic at the all-candidates meeting. Trafc on the Dempster has been steadily increasing but 2015 was a slightly unex- pected bumper year for the town accord- ing to marketing coordinator Taylor Gifn. There were signatures from people from all six continents in the towns guestbook one week over the summer. More recently a tour bus of about 60 tour- ists including eight journalistslmographers from China passed through Inuvik via the Dempster. The town welcomed them with local food and a tour of the highlights and nished with a photo shoot in front of the town logo with furs borrowed from the Arctic Chalet Resort. A return trip is in the works. Where Yellowknife has a stranglehold on the Japanese market were always looking at the Asian market and China would be good to tap into Gifn said. Visitors have a good time while they are in town regardless of their origin according to a weekly survey at the visitors centre. All of the tourists interviewed said they had a very good time during the average 4.75 days they spent in Inuvik and that they would recom- mend the experience to others. Gifn said most tourists were drawn to the town to experience local culture and north- ern life to cross the Arctic Circle and to see the scenery and wildlife. On Saturdays they had the chance to shop local from growers and artisans at the Arc- tic Market which nished its third summer in September. Led by volunteers the market generated about 1150 for the town and about 180 for each of the vendors on average per weeksellinglocallygrownmadecarvedsewn cooked baked or created items. There was a minimum of eight vendors selling on each of the 12 Saturdays in the markets season. Another growing attraction is the Dempster itself. Every year drivers take their cars trucks and recreational vehicles up the road to the northernmost Canadian settlement accessible byroadjustforthetripaccordingtoGifnand two-wheeled tourism is picking up too. Adventuremotorcyclingstartswithdualsport bikes suitable for both long-haul highway rides and rugged trail use as Rush drummer Neil Peart put it when he described working up his nerve to tackle the Dempster designed with highclearancelong-travelsuspensionandstout wheelstohandleheavybaggageandbadroads. AstudyonmotorcycletourismontheDemp- sterreleasedbytheGNWTandtheYukongov- ernment earlier this year found that like Peart the people adventure riding the Dempster are almost entirely men 45-64 years of age 40 per cent of them American and almost all of them riding BMWs. Half earned 120000 per year ormoreandtheytendedtospendabout1000 on supplies and accommodations on their trip. They sought out travel destinations based on outstanding scenery wilderness and wild- life areas and seek physical challenges while maintaining personal safety. Itsapparentfromthetwophasesofthestudy thattheDempsterHighwayrepresentsasigni- cantportionoftheoverallmotorcycletripbutit isnottheonlydestinationothernorthernroads andevensouthernprovincesareincludedinthe trip itineraries the report states. Kathy Lowe from Clayton Ontario had an amazing experience that was beyond her wildest dreams this year when she and her husband took their grandkids up the highway after 45 years of talking about it according to a release prepared by Gifn. Its almost like an adventure travel op- portunity Gifn said. Its a growing trend that weve got to pay attention to. Now that the robust summer is gone the town is preparing for the annual Inuvik Sun- rise Festival and participation in the Muskrat Jamboree. Travel packages are in the pro- cess of being prepared and expectations are that both of these events will once again be highly successful. Chinese tourists pose with furs loaned from the Arctic Chalet Resort during a group trip up the Dempster Highway to Inuvik. PhotocourtesyofTaylorGifn On behalf of my wife Joan and I thank you to my campaigners who worked so hard on my campaign these last weeks and thank you to those who supported me at the polls. We fought a good fight we did our best. To the great people of the NWT it has been an honour to serve you these last nine years as your member of Parliament. We have come a long way in that time but there is much work to be done. I wish Michael McLeod the best of luck in those endeavours. Mahsi Cho Dennis Bevington Say it in 25 words or less for only 3.50 Extra words are 20 centseach.Businessclassifieds are 10 for 30 words and 25 centsforeach additionalword. Email your advertising to adsnorj.ca or fax it to 872-2754 or call 872-3000 ext. 26 FOR SALE FIREWOOD. Cus- tom cut sizes - split green dry bagged. Wood Gasification Outdoor wood boilers. Delivery from Fort Smith to Hay River Yellowknife. Contact Dave at 867 872-3435 or cell 872-0229 or email dhehnnorthwestel. net. UFN For Sale 2008 Chevrolet van. Low mileage 28000 km. Bur- gundy Uplander LS Estate w OnStar. Call Margaret Simpson at 587 521-8939 or 587 778-1120. 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Refurbished arena one small step for Fort Smith one giant leap for the NWT Wednesday October 21 2015 13 By DALI CARMICHAEL Residents of Fort Smith who toured their newly renovated arena on Oct. 15 could hardly believe they were standing in the same building that only a season earlier still had char marks crawling up the inside of the eastern wall. After suffering a re in 2013 what once was a burnt-out shell is now a white gleam- ing ice-sport mecca. LED lighting and newly installed speaker systems hang over the ice surface. A mezzanine now overlooks what will soon be ice providing a warm and in- viting space for spectators and fundraisers alike. A brand-new ice plant will recycle its generated heat and will be used to help warm the facility. The building is like a shiny new toy cello- phane peeled away ready to be played with. But perhaps more signicant than the structure itself is the green energy initiatives set to power it. The outgoing town council started the ball rolling by installing a new electric boiler system which will be powered with excess electricity from the Taltson Dam. The Taltson Dam was built to service a mine which used a lot of electricity to run pumps and motors SAO Keith Morrison explained. When the mine shut down there was a lot of under-utilized power. As it stands the Taltson Dam can generate up to about ve megawatts of power during the winter time and as many as nine during the summer. Fort Smith is about a 2.5-to-three mega- watt consumer so were talking more than enough to power a town our size Morrison said. We met with the Northwest Territories Power Corporation NTPC and we were able to negotiate a rate that is basically indexed to the cost of heating oil. Whatever the cost of heating oil is per unit of energy - in BTUs - we will pay 80 per cent of that for equivalent electricity. The initiative is the latest in the towns attempts to run its major facilities on green energy based on a power strategy devised about ve years ago. Currently JBT Elemen- tary School is heated using a similar electri- cal system while PWK High School and the connected recreation centre are warmed with a pellet boiler system. PhotosDaliCarmichael POLITICS MUNICIPAL When we did that JBT project the Power Corporation gave us a really good deal Morrison said. Not only did they give them the same discount on power that were getting but they also paid for the electric boilers to go in. We asked for that deal this time we asked for them to help us pay for them as well and they said no. The arena project should cost an estimated 150000 which would cover the price of a new boiler - about 100000 - plus installa- tion new transformers and specic controls required to run the electrical boiler. Were in the process of petitioning our MLA Morrison noted referring to Theba- cha MLA Michael Miltenberger who is also the minister in charge of the department of Environment and Natural Resources and the NTPC portfolios. Were going in and were saying Michael we want you to help us pay for this project. It meets all of your needs Morrison said. Dont put us in a line with a bunch of other people applying for green energy grants help us out. Were leading the way here. Everybody is happy if we do this. If we re- duce the cost of operating for the town we can putthatmoneyintootherthingslikerecreation programsandinfrastructureimprovements. For his part Miltenberger indicated he was enthusiastic about the project. This has been an outstanding issue for a long time where weve poured water over the damandmoneyoverthedamandenergyover the dam he said. We are offering the power on an interruptible basis around eight or nine centskwh which is a wholesale rate. Weve offered it to Fort Smith Fort Resolution and Hay River as well. Communities are looking at it I know weve had some businesses that have also indicated an interest. Miltenberger also said he was big on fast and would work to streamline the paperwork where possible. The power is sitting there we just have to get it where its needed. Eventuallythetowncouncilhopestoexpand thehydroelectricinitiativestoallthetownsma- jorinfrastructureincludingintothewaterplant and complex of library town hall and re hall. Its going to position Fort Smith to be- come the greenest community in the North said Mayor Brad Brake. In the meantime gure skaters hockey players and their supporters will be the rst to enjoy the towns newest green facility set to open in early November. FOR SALE 2008 FORD RANGER 4X4Low KMs Stick shift. 12K or BO. Must be seen to be appreciated For information contact Don at 872-3511 donnorj.ca Contact Cascade Graphics at 867 872-3000 or graphicsnorj.ca 207 McDougal Rd Fort Smith NT We offer a range of custom design services You name it well print it User groups and council members tour through the upgraded Fort Smith arena on Oct. 15. 14 Wednesday October 21 2015 JUSTICE RCMP ROUND-UP All services will continue without interruption. www.dot.gov.nt.ca Were moving to 5015 - 49 Street www.dot.gov.nt.ca Moving Monday October 26 The Yellowknife Driver and Vehicle Licensing Oce is moving to the rst oor in the new oce building downtown. By CRAIG GILBERT Sitting MLA Michael Nadli has been sen- tenced to 45 days in jail. Before being charged with assault causing bodily harm in April the Deh Cho MLA had indicated he intended to run for re-election. He pleaded guilty to the charge in June the second time he had been convicted for assault. In 2004 he was sentenced to six months probation for assaulting his spouse. The court heard Nadli left his family home in Fort Providence to attend church leaving his wife with one of his sons. The son phoned Nadli to tell him his wife was talking on the phonewithanotherman.WhenNadlireturned he dumped out her beer and demanded she leave. When she did not he slapped her and tried to pull her out of the house by the arm. Doctors later determined her wrist had been broken. NadlitheformerGrandChiefoftheDehcho First Nations did not respond to a message sent to his government email address. CommunicationsdirectorforcabinetAndrew Livingstone said in an email it would be inap- propriateforthepremieroranycabinetminister tocommentonthecase.TheclerkoftheGNWT legislature Tim Mercer issued a press release Oct.15statingNadlihadbeenautomaticallydis- qualiedfromsittingoractingasanMLAand was no longer eligible for any benets or pay. Although the seat is not formally declared vacant until the time for Mr. Nadlis right of appeal has expired or any appeal has been MLA suspended after jail sentence for assault decided vacancy will nonetheless occur on October 25 2015 as a result of the dissolu- tion of the 17th Legislative Assembly and the calling of a general election on Oct. 26 Mer- cer wrote. A by-election is not necessary and the Legislative Assembly is not required to reconvene to address this matter. Prisoner rushed from Fort Smith cell block The scream of an ambulances siren pierced the early evening in Fort Smith Friday Oct. 16 as a prisoner was rushed from the RCMP detachments cell block. Officers found the elderly male prisoner in medical distress shortly after 6 p.m. and summoned EMS who transported him to the local health centre. He was later brought by medevac to Edmonton for fur- ther treatment. The brass at G Division headquarters in Yellowknife has brought in an outside police service to investigate the circumstances. The prisoners family has been notied. Deadly rollover near Behchoko One person was killed and two others in- jured after a vehicle rolled over on Highway 3 between Fort Providence and Behchoko according to the RCMP. Amotoristcameacrossthecrashatkilometre 114 near Chan Lake just before 10 a.m. on Oct. 16. Police are still investigating they believe slipperyroadconditionsmayhavebeenafactor. RCMP nd generator Yellowknife RCMP are keeping a DeWalt generator safe until its owner appears. A resident found the generator in a wooded area on 52nd street and reported it to police. Any person who believes it may be theirs is asked to contact Yellowknife RCMP at 867- 669-5200. Be prepared to provide a descrip- tion. Anyone calling to verify ownership may be asked to provide a serial number. Liquor seized in dry community A 45-year-old Paulatuk man faces prohi- bition charges after liquor was discovered at the airport. Policelocatedandseizedthree1.77-litrebot- tles of vodka one 1.18 L bottle of whiskey and one 200 ml bottle of whiskey. Restrictions on the possession of alcohol have been in effect in Paulatuk since 2008. Any person convicted of breaking the rules is liable to a ne or jail. Anyone who has information regarding this investigation or any other crime can contact the Paulatuk RCMP at 867- 580- 1111 or re- port anonymously through CrimeStoppers at 1-800-222-8477 nwtnutips.com or texting nwtnutips to 274637. DehCho MLA Michael Nadli was sentenced to 45 days for assault. Charges laid in 2013 Obed Mountain coal mine spill JUSTICE ENVIRONMENT By DALI CARMICHAEL Itsbeenalmosttwoyearssincecontaminants from the Obed Mountain Coal Mine spilled fromwastewaterpondintotheAthabascaRiver and now the companies responsible are facing consequences. Six charges relating to the October 2013 in- cident have been laid against and Sherritt In- ternational Corporation operating as Sherritt Coal and its subsidiary Coal Valley Resources Inc.CVRIaccordingtoareleasefromOct.16. BruceMacleananenvironmentalconsultant managingcommunityenvironmentalmonitoring programs for the Mikisew Cree and Athabasca ChipewyanFirstNationssaidtheyarehappyto see legal action being taken but still have res- ervations over the transparency of the process. The process by which those violations were chosenisstillbeingkeptfromussotheyarestill notreleasinginformationhesaid.Theycould haveletthecompaniesoffsothecommunities are happy they are being charged but I think nobodyhasreallydoneasolidenoughjobonthe environmental monitoring to convince people one way or another of the impacts. Therearealsomanyquestionsfromthecom- munity about the impacts on their treaty and indigenous rights. Theinvestigationhasbeenunderthepurview oftheAlbertaEnergyRegulatorsinceMar.2014. It was transferred from Alberta Environment and Parks formerly Alberta Environment and Sustainable Resource Development after the AER assumed responsibilities under the En- vironmental Protection and Enhancement Act EPEA and the Water Act. AER has stated that to protect the integrity of the legal process Investigation Summary ReportswillnotbepostedtotheitsCompliance Dashboarduntiltheenforcementiscompleted. Theleaktookplaceabout30kmEastofHin- ton Alta. and contaminated two tributaries of the Athabasca River with a slurry of water minerals occulent a thickener used during the production of coal and unrecovered coal. The report the company put out seems to indicate that a post freshet sediment survey that was conducted in 2014 - that would have been their research - found that all the deposit materials had been resuspended during that freshet and likely carried down to Lake Atha- basca Maclean said. It reinforces that any of the sump material will likely have settled out into the delta and be of a concern there. He noted the immediate impact concerns were with the sh habitat and the potential for the waste to smother spawning beds as it permeated the ecosystem contaminating it. The rst appearance for the charges is scheduled for Jan. 20 2016. Charges laid Onecountforacontraventionofsection227j oftheEnvironmentalProtectionandEnhance- mentActEPEAforreleasingasubstanceto the environment that caused or had the po- tential to cause a signicant adverse effect. One count for a contravention of section 227e of the EPEA for failing to comply with a condition of their EPEA approval. Twocountsforcontraventionsofsection1421 eoftheWaterActforfailingtocomplywith two conditions of their Water Act approval. Two counts for contraventions of section 561g of the Public Lands Act PLA for causing a disturbance to public land which constitutes an offence under section 541 e and 541a.1. Filephoto Wednesday October 21 2015 15 POLITICS LANGUAGE INTERIOR HEAVY EQUIPMENT Operator School www.IHESCHOOL.com Call Now 1-866-399-3853 Housing Transportation Packages Available NO SIMULATORS JOB ASSISTANCE FOR LIFE NEVER SHARE MACHINES START ANY MONDAY GET TRAINED. GET WORKING. WESCLEAN NORTHERN SALES WESCLEAN NORTHERN SALES is the NWTs first choice for Janitorial and Industrial Supplies Flooring Paint and Wallcoverings Premium Wood Pellet Sales and Door to Door Truck Courier Service WESCLEAN 15 Industrial Drive Hay River NT Tel 875-5100 Fax 875-5115 www.wescleannwt.com Flooring Area Rugs Paint Coverings al Supplies W ESCLEA N N.W.T. IN ds 7 Flooring Area Rugs Paint Coverings al Supplies interior design headquarters Buffalo Express AIR Toll-free 1 800 465-3168 salesbuffaloairexpress.com www.buffaloairexpress.com Yellowknife - 867 765-6002 Hay River - 867 874-3307 Edmonton - 780 455-9283 WE SERVICE ALL POINTS IN THE NWT that are accessible by commercial aircraft. Ask about our TRUCK AIR EXPRESS RATESTruck Air Express trucks from Edmonton and Calgary and flies out of Yellowknife. By DALI CARMICHAEL Expecting parents may someday be able to use traditional Dene names on their chil- drens government-issued identification thanks to a push from the NWT Languages Commissioner. The ofce has released a report to the gov- ernment of the Northwest Territories notify- ing it that the Vital Statistics Act VSA vi- olates the spirit and intent of the Ofcial Languages Act. According to the commissioner this is be- cause the VSA does not allow for names that contain Dene fonts diacritical marks and symbols used in ofcial Aboriginal languages. The report comes after the acting com- missioner Shannon Gulberg received two complaints. By only allowing the use of characters from the Roman alphabet Gulberg said parents are prevented from honouring their Aboriginal heritage by giving their children Aboriginal names. She further pressed the government to recognize its obligation to provide ser- vices in Aboriginal ofcial languages when it comes to birth registration and the issu- ance of birth certicates. There was a solid recommendation and then there was a backup recommendation in case we couldnt actually meet the rst rec- ommendation Health and Social Services Minister Glen Abernethy said in an interview with the Journal. We have to review her ndings we have to gure out how it applies and then we have to gure out how to move. Were doing that work now. Abernethy stated the most difcult factor in accommodating the recommendations comes from the need to align identication pieces with federal standards. IntheNorthwestTerritorieswehaveanof- ciallanguagesactthatrecognizes11different languages whereas Canada only recognizes two he said. We recognize that language is inherenttocultureandwerecognizethatpeople want to use traditional names and spellings. We would love to nd a way to accommodate that but the challenge is if we do that are we adverselyaffectingthemandmakingittoodif- cult forthemto do things like traveling inter- nationallyordealwithuniversitieshospitals and health centres in southern Canada HoweverGulbergsreportpreemptivelyen- courages the GNWT to push forward on the initiative despite the obstacles it might face in working with other levels of government. The Legislative Assembly and the Govern- ment of the Northwest Territories must be leaders in this issue and can not stop moving on the issue because of concerns that other jurisdictions may not follow suit Gulberg said in a release. Issues of Aboriginal heri- tage culture and language should be of con- cern to people throughout Canada. Therecommendationcameonlyaweekafter theGNWTannouncedtheformalintroduction oftheStrongCulturesStrongTerritoryGNWT Culture and Heritage Strategic Framework whichwascreatedtoalignexistingcultureand heritage activities of all GNWT departments around shared goals and priorities over the next decade. A major component of the strat- egy includes boosting support for the foun- dational role of Aboriginal culture including languages through government initiatives. I can tell you the federal passport of- ces and Service Canada said theres no way theyll be able to accommodate things like the glottal stop which makes us have to look at the commissioners secondary recommen- dation how we can do something with our own documentation to recognize it here in the Northwest Territories Abernethy said. We use the Dene fonts already we have the ability to provide documents in different lan- guages accordingly. The government has 30 days to respond to the report however Abernethy said ulti- mately action on the recommendations will have to be taken by the 18th Assembly. Whats in a name Ties to heritage languages commish Health and Social Services Minister Glen Abernethy says the government is looking into the possibility of adding Dene fonts to some government-issued identification at the recommendation of the NWT Languages Commissioner. PhotoGlenAbernethy ENVIRONMENT MYSTERY 16 Wednesday October 21 2015 6.8103 in x 6.3125 in By CRAIG GILBERT A global phenomenon but one not of this world the paradox of the fairy door has spread to the Northwest Territories. The path to Hay Rivers tiniest secret be- gins somewhere along the water outside town. Kim Rapati of the Northern Farm Training Institute NFTI discovered them and deliberately describes their location vaguely to keep an element of surprise alive for her students. That piqued the interest of transplanted Yellowknifer Amy Lam who augmented her gardening skills at NFTI over the summer and found the tiny town in the woods. It was nice to walk along the trail and nd a door then another one and another one Lam said. Its whimsical. Its nice to come across these little surprises. In a big- ger city you see these anonymous art instal- lations and projects a little more so it was really nice to see something like that in Hay River and really nice to see pieces of art in nature as well. Lam moved to the NWT three years ago after travelling the world and not quite feel- ing the city anymore when she returned home to Toronto. She followed a friend who was relocating to Fort Smith but stayed in Yellowknife. She may not have seen a fairy door dur- ing her travels but others around the world have. In Ann Arbor Michigan more than a dozen fairy doors adorn buildings around the city including one on the front wall of a bookstore that opens to reveal a scene Amy Lam discovered these fairy doors in the forest outside Hay River where she was taking a workshop at the Northern Farm Training Institute. Hay Rivers tiniest secret a NWT fairy tale including classic volumes whose titles can be made out and another at the Google ofces labelled Giggle in near-Google typeface. A request for comment emailed to the Urban Fairies Operators of Ann Arbor was not answered before press deadline. It appears fairies arent welcome every- where or more accurately in any quantity though. Park ofcials in the United Kingdom have had to take steps to curb fairy door pro- liferation in Wayford Woods Crewkerne ac- cording to the BBC. Hundreds of the doors some tasteful many gaudy have popped up at the bases of trees. In many cases small gurines and other features have appeared creating tiny scenes in what some call the fairy woods. Weve had as many as 10 doors put up on a single tree they surrounded the tree trustee Steven Acreman told the BBC. We had a complete fairy fairground arrive but we rejected that planning proposal. The doors and other accessories can be bought online. Some miniature scenes have appeared in the Hay River woods as well. Lam would not admit responsibility for any of the fairy doors or whether she plans to ex- pand the tiny universe nor would she deny it. Friends and I talk about that a lot doing somethinglikeanartinstallationaroundYel- lowknife where you dont know who it belongs toorwhereitcamefromshesaid.Itsanidea thatsalreadytakenbutIlovethewholeconcept of having little art projects around the city that arentattributedtoanyonesosomeonecanhappen across it and it just brings a smile to their day. PhotoscourtesyofAmyLam