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Portrait of a survivor AlbertaMLAMariaFitzpatrick was surprised when her tale of surviving domestic abuse went viral and brought her colleagues to their feet. See page 6. Not quite the Paris column you were expecting T h e N o r t h e r n F a r m Training Institute has a nifty perspective on youth engagement and naturally it is all about the soil. See page 15. HOLD YOUR HORSES Wildrose says the NDP rushed a new farmranch safety law. See page 14. You better watch out you better not cry The Jolly Old Elf made a day- trip down from the North Pole to delight the masses in Yellowknife on Saturday. See page 11. Aboriginal leaders rectify leg-itimate beef with Alberta Representatives of the Aboriginal caucus of CEMA hadamoreproductivemeeting withtheenvironmentminister the second time around. See page 7. V IS IT W W W .N O R J.C A A national award winning independent newspaper serving northern Alberta and the Northwest Territories since 1977 1.00 November 25 2015 Vol. 39 No. 30 PhotoBarbCameron My three-year-old son Charlie is climbing on this stretched moosehide Barb Cameron writes. The 2016 CPAWS Love the Land calendar is here. See page 8. Incumbents decimated in NWT election By CRAIG GILBERT and DALI CARMICHAEL Voters from Nahendeh to Nunak- put chose change Monday ousting incumbent MLAs across the North- west Territories. As late as 10 p.m. two hours after thepollsclosedracesthroughoutthe NWTwerewithinahandfulofvotes ortiedoutright.ElectiondayNov.23 wasthisweekspressdeadlineandall results quoted are unofcial. JackieJacobsonNunakputincum- bent and Speaker of the House dur- ingthe17thAssemblylosthisseatby justfourvotestoHerbertNakimayak 229 to 224. Nakimayak is a manager atanIqaluit-basedpropertycompany with experience with Parks Canada andtheNorthwestTerritoriesPower Corporation. Just to the south Inuvik ridings proved loyal returning incumbents Alfred Moses in Inuvik-Boot Lake andRobertC.McLeodinInuvik-Twin LakesasdidMackenzieDeltawhere Frederick Blake Jr. retained his seat. ShaneThompsonwhosaidhewas applyingforajobmorethanrunning for a seat in a seven-way race got the nodinNahendehrunningawaywith the riding represented by Kevin Me- nicoche since 2003. Surviving a whirlwind of contro- versy at the outset of the campaign whenhespentaweekinjailforcharges ofassaultagainsthisspouseandwas suspended from the legislative as- semblyDehChoincumbentMichael Nadli held on to his seat just besting hisclosestcompetitorRonaldBonne- trouge with 190 votes to 172. Newcomer and business owner DanielMarkMcNeelytooktheSahtu ridingjustscrapingpastYvonneDoo- littlewith239votes.McNeelysaidhis experienceasabusinessownermade him a strong candidate. Both five-term incumbent Jane Groenewegen and Robert Bouchard were defeated handily by new Hay River South MLA-elect Wally Schumann and Hay River North MLA-elect Rocky Simpson in what weretwooftherstraces to become clear enough to call but far from the last to see veterans fall. Fort Smith lawyer and former deputy mayor Louis Sebert de- feated ve-term titan incumbent Michael Miltenberger who spent the last 14 years in cabinet most recently as minister of nance and the environment. Sebertwhonishedwith401votes to Miltenbergers 363 said Monday night the desire for political change expressed at the municipal and fed- eral levels on Oct. 19 had taken hold at the territorial level as well. Sebert said he was never sure of winning. He has not thought ahead to being named to cabinet. I felt no matter which candidate won Fort Smith was going to be well-represented. In Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh incumbent and cabinet member Tom Beaulieu swept up the votes winning with 410 votes to Richard Edjericons 177. YellowknifeSouthincumbent and Premier Bob McLeod held his seat handily defeating Nigitstil Nor- bert a Gwichya Gwichin from Tsi- igehtchic who told the Journal she ranprimarilyasanactofindigenous resistance. McLeodsaidbeforetheelectionhe has unnished business after eight years in the legislature. InamuchtighterraceRangeLake MLA Daryl Dolynny fell to his only challenger Caroline Cochrane who toldtheJournalsheheardaboutcost of living on the doorstep. Yellowknife Centre meanwhile saw newcomer Julie Green unseat incumbentRobertHawkins491-400. InthebattleforYellowknifeNorth formercitycouncillorCoryVanthuyne came out on top in a ve-way race beating his former colleague Dan Wong by only 16 votes. Atightfour-wayraceinFrameLake endedwithAlternativesNorthcandi- dateKevinOReillywinningtheriding with just 156 votes trailed closely by JanFullertonwith141DavidWasylciw with 132 and Roy Erasmus with 117. HealthandSocialServicesMinister Glen Abernethy won back the Great Slaveridinginalandslideagainsthis onlyopponentChrisClarkeofcially enteringhisthirdtermintheassembly. Kieron Testarts decision to drop out of the running for Liberal candi- dateinthefederalelectionearlierthis year paid off it seems as he took the Kam Lake riding away from incum- bent and former minister of Justice and Industry Tourism and Invest- ment David Ramsay. Deputy premier Jackson Lafferty was acclaimed in Monfwi. 2 Wednesday November 25 2015 INDUSTRY MINING NEWS BRIEFS Federal opposition names critics Two northern Alberta MPs David Yurdiga Fort McMur- ray-Cold Lake and Chris Warkentin Grande Prairie- Mackenzie have been handed critic portfolios by Con- servative Opposition Leader Rona Ambrose. Yurdiga will handleNorthernAffairswhileWarkentingetsAgriculture and Agri-Food. Other Alberta MPs tapped for the shadow cabinet include National Revenue critic Ziad Aboultaif Edmonton-Manning International Development critic Deepak Obhrai Calgary-Forest Lawn Immigration critic Michelle Rempel Calgary-Nose Hill and International Trade critic Gerry Ritz Battlefords-Lloydminster. Aklavik womans death a homicide AwomanfoundalongasnowmobiletrailinAklavikN.W.T. with suspicious injuries on Nov. 11 has died in hospital in Edmonton.ShewasidentiedbyCBCNewsasMayElanik ayoungmotheroffour.TheRCMPGDivisionmajorcrimes unithaveupgradedtheirinvestigationtoahomicide.Wed really like to hear from anyone who has any knowledge of any activity on or near J.J. Stewart Road area Aklavik ConstableToddGlemsersaid.TheblackiPhonecontinues to be an item we are seeking information on as well. Call thepoliceat867-978-1111contactCrimestoppersat1-800- 222-8477 or nwtnutips.com or text nwtnutips to 274637. English only OK in Alberta TheymayhavebeentheonlytwotrafcticketstheSupreme CourtofCanadahaseverdealtwith.Ina6-3rulingthecourt decidedlastweekAlbertawillnothavetopublishandenact laws in both ofcial languages. The legal ght began when Gilles Caron received a ticket in 2003. He had argued that legislative bilingualism extended to modern Alberta based on an assurance from Parliament in 1867 and in the 1870 order that created the province. Caron and another driver wontheircaseinprovincialcourtbutthedecisionwasover- turnedonappealbeforeitwasacceptedbytheSupremeCourt. WALLYS Drugs Pharmacy . Souvenirs . Magazines . Newspapers Toys . Cards . Stationery . Lottery Ticket Centre Monday to Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday CLOSED 867 872-213468 Breynat St. Fort Smith BLACK FRIDAY TOY SALE Open from 700 to 1100 pm Friday Nov. 27 BLACK FRIDAYBLACK FRIDAYBLACK FRIDAYBLACK FRIDAYBLACK FRIDAYBLACK FRIDAYBLACK FRIDAY By DALI CARMICHAEL The Giant Mine remedia- tion project is one step closer in coming to fruition follow- ing the announcement that an oversight body has been selected. Giant Mine remediation project oversight body named As stipulated in a multi- party environmental agree- ment signed this past June members from the Yellow- knives Dene First Nation North Slave Metis Alliance the City of Yellowknife the government of the North- west Territories Alterna- tives North and Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada will come together to repre- sent their partys interests. I was really surprised at how well everyones back- ground and experience kind of complimented each other. We do have areas in which there are going to be subject matter experts said Todd Slacknominatedtotheboard by YKDFN. Slack a 15-year veteran in natural resources industries is the boards in- terim chair he will be re- placed by Dr. Kathy Racher a water chemistry specialist in January 2016. Others on the independent body include vice-chair Dr. Stephan Gabos a special- ist in public health who was nominated by NSMA secre- tary treasurer Tony Brown a civil environmental engi- neer nominated by the City of Yellowknife former envi- ronmental technician and manager of environmental protection services Ken Hall nominated by GNWT Ginger Stones former director of General Environment under the federal department of Na- tional Defence nominated by Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada and former GNWT employee and current environmentalstewardDavid Livingstone nominated by Alternatives North. It will be up to the board to promote awareness of the project to the public provide input and advice from each of the organizations involved and manage a program of re- search toward a permanent solution for dealing with ar- senic at the Giant Mine site. Currently the board - which had its rst meeting at the end of October - is wrap- ping up its administrative tasks with the goal of initi- ating public involvement in the Giant projects starting February 2016. Weve got a sense of the site and the directors are doing the reviews. They are starting to read up on the projects in their respective areas and then the rst pub- lic involvement is going to be into February were going to be involved with this design workshop. Were going to be developingourownworkplan and our own budgeting after that Slack said. The board has been as- signed to compile and ana- lyze available data relevant to the project report on and make recommendations regarding programs and plans promote integration of traditional knowledge into project environmen- tal programs and plans promote active research toward a permanent solu- tion for dealing with con- taminants including arse- nic at the site and review environmental and engi- neering studies conducted related to the site. Were going to be start- ing to consider the research programs that were going to administer so thats going to involve a state of the knowl- edge report and so what were trying to do is take a holis- tic pause here take a holistic view and think about what do we know about arsenic trioxide what is the state of treatment lets look around the world and get our folks up to speed. And then the next step after that is what are the priorities for the best value for the research that were going to support The most pressing con- cern associated with the Giant Mine remediation is the 237000 tonnes of highly toxic arsenic trioxide stored underground as well as tail- ings from past activities which have the potential to contaminate surrounding groundwater. The board is one of 26 re- quirements stipulated in the Giant Mine Remediation Project Environmental As- sessment EA which con- cluded in August of 2014. In addition to seeking more permanent solutions for the underground contaminants the EA requires the investi- gation of options to divert Baker Creek off site and the adoption of stricter efuent water quality criteria. I was really surprised at how well everyones background and experience kind of complimented each other. Todd Slack Giant Mine oversight PhotoBobWilson Parties to the Giant Mine remediation project sign onto an environmental agreement on June 9 2015. The oversight body for the agreement was named in late October. Wednesday November 25 2015 3 JUSTICE MMIW BLACK FRIDAY SALE Open Late for Black Friday Enjoy exceptional holiday savings and extended shopping hours. This is our BIGGESTsale of the year Northern Store Fort Smith NT 867-872-2568 Friday November 27 from 900 a.m. - 1000 p.m. By DALI CARMICHAEL Foryearsadvocateshavebeencallingforan inquiryintocasesofmissingandmurderedin- digenouswomenacallthatwasansweredlast week when Indigenous and Northern Affairs MinisterCarolynBennettannouncedthedepart- mentwasinitiatingconsultationswithfamilies ofvictims-therststepintheinquiryprocess. Many advocates took the move as a victory though many questions remain about the scope of the inquiry which the government has dedicated 40 million towards so far. One of those questions rings loudly will incidents of missing and murdered Indige- nous men be examined as well In an interview with the CBC Bennett did not rule out the possibility. Whenyoulookatthesystemicproblemsand theeffectsofcolonizationtheeffectsofresiden- tial school there is no question that men and boyshavealsobeenvictimsofthissystemshe said.Ithinkthatitwouldbeimpossibletosep- arateouttheneedsofthemenandboysaswell aswebegintoaddressthesystemicproblems. An inquiry for men and women A growing number of advocates have been pushing for a gender-inclusive inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous people. In an Apr. 27 column published by the Na- tional Post University of British Columbia- Okanagan political science professor and genocide expert Dr. Adam Jones added his voice to the mix. According to Statistics Canada data com- piled by my research assistant Penny Hand- ley approximately 2500 aboriginal people were murdered in Canada between 1982 and 2011 out of 15000 murders in Canada over- all he wrote. Of the 2500 murdered ab- original Canadians fully 71 per cent 1750 were male and 745 were female and one was of unknown gender. A further 105 ab- original women were listed as missing for at least 30 days as of 2013 in cases where the reason for their disappearance was deemed unknown or foul play suspected according to a Toronto Star report. AnRCMPreportreleasedinMayofthisyear differs slightly with data indicating 1017 ab- originalwomenhavebeenmurderedsince1980. At this time there is no similar RCMP re- portdedicatedtoIndigenousmenandnoplans are in place to create one in the near future. We continue to focus our efforts on pre- venting violence against Aboriginal women to reduce the incidence of homicides and disap- pearanceswithinthisvulnerablepopulationa nationalRCMPspokespersontoldtheJournal. Taking matters into their own hands Jen Mt. Pleasant a masters student at Wil- frid Laurier University who hails from Six Na- tions Ontario is focusing her major research project on analyzing data she has collected on missing and murdered indigenous men. I started my research about ve years ago. I started with missing and murdered indig- enous women and then the more research I was doing the more stories I was coming across of missing and murdered indigenous men. It just seemed like no one was really paying attention to that she said. I think its misinforming people that only the indig- enous women are being victimized. Over the last two-and-a-half years Mt. Pleasant has compiled information from sta- tistics and media coverage creating a data- base of MMIM. Within the rst month I had about 300 names she said. Those names came from mostly publically accessible online police databases and the RCMP and then I relied mostly on news articles. Now she has about 750 names in her da- tabase though she said she has more to add her education has left her with limited time to dedicate to the project. Eventually she intends to publish her database online. Mt. Pleasant said she would like to eventually see a holistic inquiry to address the systemic nature of violence often perpetrated against Indigenous families as a whole. With women a lot of cases remain un- solved she said. For the men its different - usually its somebody that is known to him a lot of times its gang-related. She also pointed to a pattern of police-per- petrated violence against indigenous men highlighting the Starlight Tours of Saska- toon where police were caught driving men out of the city and abandoning them there. WithoutorganizationsliketheNativeWomens AssociationofCanada-thenationalgroupthat hassofeverentlydedicateditselftothecauseof missingandmurderedIndigenouswomen-Mt. Pleasant said it might not be realistic to have men included in an inquiry right away. It took literally 30 years to get missing and murdered women into the spotlight its only been in the last three years or so that its been covered so heavily in the media she said. It took decades of grassroots people and family members from all over Canada advocating for this and so I cant expect my research to just hop in the spotlight. Its going to take time. In an attempt to speed up that process Jones launched a petition calling for a gender- inclusive inquiry in mid-November. It seems to me that we have to opportu- nity potentially to stage an intervention that would encourage some measure of refram- ing both the campaign for an inquiry and the broader discussion of violence against aboriginal women and men girls and boys across the country Jones said. As of Nov. 23 about 80 supporters had signed the online petition. Murdered and missing aboriginal women and girls I think that has to be front-and- centre in any broader initiative he said. I have an image in my mind of something that Ive called a First Nations Anti-Violence Ini- tiative which would be aimed at getting to grips with systemic issues of very long stand- ing and of a very highly destructive nature that I think need to be discussed alongside any discussion of violent victimization of ab- original communities. These include but arent limited to the structural violence and the legacy of Canadas dispossession of Native peoples domestic and partner violence child abuse includ- ing in the residential school system suicide homelessness and addiction issues. Mt. Pleasant said she was weary of the pe- tition - due to its timing and the fact it was initiated by someone who does not identify as indigenous - but ultimately she agreed that its intentions were good. If you want to look at the whole issue of vio- lencethenyouhavetoreallylookatitfromand indigenous peoples perspective and not just specicallyindigenouswomenbecausealotof men are included in being victimized as well. Anti-violence advocates call for gender-neutral inquiry into missing murdered indigenous people PhotoCaseyKoyczan Yellowknifers take to the street in a march for missing and murdered women. Could the same thing happen but for men 4 Wednesday November 25 2015 The Northern Journal is an independent newspaper covering news and events in the western Arctic and northern Alberta. The Northern Journal is published weekly by Cascade Publishing Ltd. Printed at Star Press Inc. Wainwright AB. Publisher................................................................................. Don Jaque 867-872-3000 ext.21 donnorj.ca Editor..................................................................................... Craig Gilbert 867-872-3000 ext.24 newsnorj.ca Reporter....................................................................... Dali Carmichael 867-872-3000 ext.25 reporternorj.ca Comptroller .......................................................Jessica Dell 867-872-3000 ext.20 webnorj.ca Advertising........................................................................... 867-872-3000 ext.26 adsnorj.ca Administration............................................Jeremy Turcotte 867-872-3000 ext.26 adminnorj.ca Production Manager ......................................Sandra Jaque 867-872-3000 ext.22 sandranorj.ca Graphics........................................................Paul Bannister 867-872-3000 ext.27 graphicsnorj.ca Letters to the Editor Policy The Northern Journal welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and include a phone number so the author can be veried. Names will be withheld on request in special circumstances where the reasons are determined to be valid. The Journal reserves the right to edit letters for length libel clarity and taste. Opinions expressed in letters and columns are not necessarily those of the publisher or editor. EDITORIAL LETTER TO THE EDITOR 2013 CCNA BLUE RIBBON CANADIAN COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER AWARD 2013 C M C A AUDITED Advertising Deadlines Display ad deadline is Thursday at 400 p.m. Classied ad deadline is Thursday at 500 p.m. Email adsnorj.ca Subscription Rates Prices include GST. 47.25 in Fort Smith 52.50 elsewhere in Canada 105 in the USA overseas 164.30. The Northern Journal acknowledges the nancial support of the Government of Canada through the Canada Periodical Fund CPF for our publishing activities. After years of the former federal Conser- vative government dismissing missing and murdered indigenous women our countrys national epidemic as an enforcement issue there is a groundswell of optimism about the new Liberal prime ministers pledge to call a national inquiry. The anticipation is palpable and widespread. How governments treat their most vul- nerable citizens is telling in the way they are measured. Think of Syria where civil war has forced millions from their homes or Russia where exhibiting homosexual behavior will get you jailed or worse still India where in rural villages it is still possible for women to be sentenced to gang-rape for crimes com- mitted by male family members. Thankfully life is much better in Canada for most of us. A stark contrast remains along racial lines between how your life is going to be socio-economically and tragically how likely you are to disappear or die. Indigenous Canadians represent about 4.3 per cent of the countrys population but ac- count for more than 23 per cent of those in- carcerated. They also account for 14 per cent of murders among women and 17 per cent of deaths at the hands of others among men. An- other shocking statistic is that 70 per cent of murdered indigenous women die at the hand oftheirpartnerorspouse-amajorreasonthat womenssheltersintheNWTareover-owing. On Nov. 11 while many people in the NWT were taking part in Remembrance Day cer- emonies May Elanik an indigenous woman and mother of four girls aged four to 13 was found beaten and unconscious along a snow- mobile trail in Aklavik a hamlet of less than 650 people 50 kilometres west of Inuvik. Medevaced to Edmonton for treatment she never regained consciousness. The investiga- tion into her death has become yet another tragic homicide investigation into the death of an indigenous Canadian woman. A study by University of British Columbia political science professor Adam Jones found thatbetween1980and2012asmanyas2500 aboriginalpeopleweremurdered1750males The casual brutality facing Aboriginal men Editor In preparation for the Territorial election Fracking Action North FAN asked MLA candidates 1. Wouldyousupportamoratoriumonhorizon- talhydraulicfracturingwhyorwhynotand under what conditions would you allow it 2. Will you commit to proposing or supporting a motion calling for a moratorium on frack- ing until a comprehensive transparent and publicreviewoftherisksandacceptabilityof fracking in the NWT is completed Of the 60 candidates only 29 replied. Of these 17 61 per cent supported a moratorium on fracking. Eighteen 64 per cent commit- ted to proposing or supporting a motion to the NWTLegislaturecallingforamoratoriumuntil apublicreviewofrisksdeemedthemacceptable. Full responses can be read at www.cocnwt.ca. The responses inform our vote. We nd the lack of insight into the issues associated with hydrocarbonexploitationquiterevealing.While all the normal impacts of oil and gas exploita- tion are of concern health effects impacts on water and wildlife community polarization higher costs of living without higher incomes formostpeoplefewcandidatesrecognizethat continued fossil fuel development and use will have exceptional and extreme impacts on our climateandwide-rangingconsequencesforre- sponsible governments and residents. Theimpactsarenolongerofthefuturethey are happening here and now. Record droughts around the world and here in the NWT are Revealing lack of insight on fracking amongst MLA candidates bringing truth to all the forecasts about the need to conserve water. Loss of permafrost alone is expected to cost billions of dollars in damage to public infrastructure. WorldgovernmentsgatherinParisnextweek to develop aggressive national responses to a nowdireclimatesituation.Scientiststellusthat 80 per cent of known fossil fuel reserves must remain in the ground - including reserves in the North - if we are to avoid dangerous levels of climate change. This is an accepted fact but we are way behind in our responses. Still there is reason for optimism. Ap- propriate responses exist. We can develop a system-wide approach to tackling climate change beginning with the adoption of re- newable energy to replace fossil fuels. We have the technology and know-how to do this. Not only does renewable energy reduce the threat of dangerous climate change it is a way to address many of todays challenges such as the loss of the middle class income disparity living costs and the need for mean- ingful and lasting jobs and revitalize our so- cial fabric and cultural diversity. But political will is needed starting today. Northerners need leaders who are willing and able to change with the times acknowledge the science of climate change and push for what is best for our families and communi- ties now and in the long-term. Lois Little Co-Chair Council of Canadians NWT Chapter and 745 females. Indigenous men have been killedatmorethantwicetherateofindigenous women and more disappear as well. That fact must be addressed in the new federal inquiry. The terrible problem facing our country is not onlymissingandmurderedindigenouswomen it is about violence that too often befalls all in- digenous Canadians. That must be addressed in an encompassing way. Professor Jones has suggested what is ur- gently needed is a First Nations Anti-Violence Initiativewhichwouldaddresstopicsincluding The structural violence of poverty discrim- ination and dispossession from ancestral territories Intergenerational trauma resulting from residential schools Suicide and homicide epidemics within In- digenous populations WhiteEuropean racism That information is common knowledge but the devil is very much in the details. Obvi- ously those ndings or some version of them mustbederivedfromthenationalinquirybut Joneshasgivenusinsightintowhatwillshape the eventual verdicts and solutions. The problems facing indigenous women and men are obviously tied intrinsically but they are at the same time different for indigenous women than for men. It is difcult to make the case for a somehow gender-neutral in- quiry into missing and murdered indigenous people in the wake of such horric crimes but the numbers do not lie. Two separate and distinct approaches to missing and murdered Indigenous people are required.Onecomponentisneededonwomen and girls that acknowledges both the systemic social issues of racism and poverty that ren- ders them vulnerable and too often victims of violence or murder as well as the frequency of domestic violence in their lives then another on indigenous men and boys focused on their disproportionate representation in prisons as well as their too often being victims of violent actsandmurder.Itisanextremelycomplexissue anditneedsacomplexandthoroughapproach. Jonesndingsareevidence-basedandshould be considered by the Trudeau Liberals as they fullltheirelectionpledgetolaunchanational inquiryintomissingandmurderedIndigenous women. They should broaden the scope of it to includemissingandmurderedmenandthetwo separateanddistinctbutinter-relatedpathways of violence that impact each gender. This will be the question of our generation. It will be a key means by which the Liberal government with the luxury of a four year mandate denes itself. It will also determine how Canada will appear to and be judged by the rest of the world. Itisdifculttomakethecase for a gender-neutral inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous people but the numbers do not lie. Whether you call it a snow chicken like the Americans or a thunderbird like the Japanese the ptarmigan ofcial bird of Nunavut has returned to Yellowknife for the winter. PhotoBillBraden Wednesday November 25 2015 5 COLUMNS 15 Years Ago... Mackenzie River crossings Premier Stephen Kakfwi and Western Arctic MP Ethel Blondin-Andrew have announced 3.7 million in federal funding for the completion of permanent river crossings alongtheMackenzieHighwayswinterextensionbetween Wrigley and Fort Good Hope. Funding for the two-year project approved by Indian Affairs and Northern Devel- opment minister Robert Nault comes in response to the GNWTsNon-RenewableResourceDevelopmentStrategy. Issue November 21 2000 20 Years Ago... TB outbreak in Lutsel Ke A recent outbreak of tuberculosis in Lutsel Ke has medical ofcials across the North monitoring other communities. Over 30 cases of tuberculosis TB have been recorded in the North so far this year but 19 of those were found in Lutsel Ke since August says Andr Corriveau chief medical ofcer for the western NWT. Issue November 21 1995 30 Years Ago... Fort Smith may lose Social Services to Pine Point A plan to move the regional ofce of the Department of Social Services from Fort Smith to Pine Point is being considered by the government executive in meetings this week in Yellowknife. There is nothing ofcial as of yet said Bruce McLaughlin the Minister of Social Services. McLaughlin is also the MLA for Pine Point. Issue November 21 1985 ARCHIVES Northern Journal 2015 Join us online Like Northern Journal on Facebook and get the weekly news delivered to your feed FACEBOOK FEEDBACK Enterprise eyes an expansion of its population of about 120 with a signicant milestone on the road to the NWTs rst wood pellet mill coming up. Enterprise eyes expansion with pellet land deal signing on horizon Joanne Hirst-Adams This is wonder- ful... for everyone in the area... LOVE seeing the Northern communities grow. The questions concerned public service job safety and public-private partnerships P3s such as the one that will see a private company build and manage the new Stanton Territorial Hospital in Yellowknife. Union confronts GNWT job cut rumours in election survey Patricia Sepp Why are they using tax- payer money to build privately operated Hospital Something is crooked First Nations must demand no privately oper- ating services By DAWN KOSTELNIK Allen hunts the giant Arc- tic snowshoe hares out on the tundra behind our house. While he is out hunting rab- bits he hears strange noises. Soundcarrieswellonthetun- dra and in the cold clear air. He follows his ears and nds a den in the vast and frozen tundra. These babies have White Girl Soldiers of God crawled out of an entrance that is barely visible in the white drifts. Snow has blown inandcoveredmostoftheen- trance to the den. It appears that the mother has not been here for days. He walks back ward and begins to circle the den. There are no tracks. The mothermustbedeadthereis nosignofher.Shewouldnever leave her babies by choice. The creatures have in- stinctively sought refuge back in their frosty home. He reacheshishandintotheden cautiously.Mommaybeinside and wounded... she will give him a good chew if she can. Slowlyhereachesinonetwo three whimpering babies are stashed in his parka three pompoms of plush grey fur. What are they Allen What will you do with them can we have one Theyarebabywhitefoxes. They look pretty grey to us. They get white as they get older. What do you feed them Canned milk and seal oil. They are hungry all of the time.Ithinktheyarestarved You kids can help me feed them. Like the Pied Piper he heads towards Graces house with a herd of kids in tow. P.S. It is stories like this onethatmakemerealizehow partsofmychildhoodwereas- tonishing. Some of the things thatweallexperiencedaschil- dren are gone and will never be seen again. Take nothing forgranted.Protectourearth. www.thewhitegirl.ca By STEPHEN KAKFWI The phrase Water is Life iscommonplaceintheNorth- west Territories. It is still the Indigenous way of thinking and how we relate to each other and our place in the universe. The words can be heard spoken around dinner tables in community halls andevenechoingoffthewalls of the Legislative Assembly. This week NWT residents once again reafrmed the importance of those words. A poll released Monday by Ducks Unlimited Canada conrms the vast majority of people in the territory place the health of water high above other pressing matters like resource extraction and want to see their regulatory system strengthened not streamlined. A simplistic reading of the pollresultsmightsuggestthat NWTresidentsareopposedto industrial development. This is not the case. Rather most Northernersrejectthenotion that economic development shouldrequiretheweakening ofenvironmentalprotections. They give the clear mandate that jobs and prosperity must not come at the cost of land water and wildlife voicing environmental concerns as second only to cost of living. It is no secret that the ter- ritory is facing a downturn in resource activity. Let us capitalize on this lull to set the stage for future devel- opment to ensure it is done right and reects the wishes of Northerners. We must take this time to build up our communities strengths in environmental protection and monitoring creating jobs for our people on the land. The work that is currently underway to estab- lishatrainingprogramforIn- digenousBorealGuardiansto manageourprotectedareasin the NWT is a key example of economic opportunities that canemergefromconservation. This is our opportunity to conduct a proper assessment ofhydraulicfracturingtolook to other jurisdictions for an- swersandtoincludethepublic in the review process. Let us ensure that the negotiations of outstand- ing Indigenous rights are completed along with land use planning during the life of the 18th Assembly as two-thirds of NWT resi- dents are demanding. This will both secure a positive future for Indigenous gov- ernments and create cer- tainty for investors. The territorial government has already taken many ac- tions to ensure our land and water is protected for all time. Important policies like the NWT Water Strategy the bilateral water agreements being negotiated with our neighbours and the Pro- tected Areas Strategy show a rm commitment to conser- vation and the protection of our life-source. With 63 per cent of residents asking for at least half of NWT lands and waters to be protected this work must continue. Recently elected Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has promised to implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the recommen- dations of the Truth and Rec- onciliation Commission and more importantly to deal with Aboriginal governments on a nation-to-nation basis. For many years the chiefs of the Dene Nation refused to have a relationship with what was formerly the Ter- ritorial Council. In 1978 a motion was made to have Dene representatives put their names forward to be elected as territorial repre- sentatives forever chang- ing the way forward for the Government of the North- west Territories. We have come a long way in starting to build a nation- to-nation relationship. This work must continue. Our new MLAs must reect on and honour that history as they seek ways to work with our Inuvialuit Mtis and Dene governments to develop a collective vision and pave the road for the 18th Assem- bly that prioritizes land use planning and protection. Stephen Kakfwi is a for- mer premier of the North- west Territories and presi- dent of the Dene Nation. He currently serves as president and CEO of Canadians for a New Partnership. Mining lull offers new MLAs rare chance to reset resource economy Its time to protect our lands as nation-to-nation partners Lethbridge-East MLA Maria Fitzpatrick was surprised when her domestic abuse survivor story went viral. The St. Johns native drew a standing ovation in the Alberta Legislature. 6 Wednesday November 25 2015 POLITICS DOMESTIC VIOLENCE Please leave a message at 872-5543 for details. WESCLEAN NORTHERN SALES LTD. Ph 867 875-5100 Fax 867 875-5155 Avalon Cat Hair - long Size - medium Gender - female Avalon is a very loving and beautiful cat. She is spayed and is up-to-date with all her shots.If you think you have a home for a Avalon please call the shelter at 872-5543. Please leave a message at 872-5543 for details. WESCLEAN NORTHERN SALES LTD. Ph 867 875-5100 Fax 867 875-5155 E-mail infowescleannwt.com web www.wescleannwt.com Avalon Cat Hair - long Size - medium Gender - female Avalon is a very loving and beautiful cat. She is spayed and is up-to-date with all her shots.If you think you have a home for a Avalon please call the shelter at 872-5543. Please leave a message at 872-5543 for details. WESCLEAN NORTHERN SALES LTD. Ph 867 875-5100 Fax 867 875-5155 E-mail infowescleannwt.com web www.wescleannwt.com Avalon Cat Hair - long Size - medium Gender - female Avalon is a very loving and beautiful cat. She is spayed and is up-to-date with all her shots.If you think you have a home for a Avalon please call the shelter at 872-5543. SpayedNeutered Up-to-datewithroutineshots House trained MinnieFemaleAdult Grey and white Looking for a new home Minnie was a very scared shy cat when she first came in. She had been kept in a bedroom and was not socialized. She has come a long way but will require some patience to gain her trust. She is a great cat just not good with other animals. By CRAIG GILBERT Fireweedrocksscruffytreesandsafehaven greeted the future MLA for Lethbridge-East and her two young daughters when they ar- rived in Yellowknife on July 24 1981. Sixty-two hours by bus removed from her husband and tormentor back in Cincinnati Maria Fitzpatrick could nally start divorce proceedings against him unafraid of another injury to herself or death threats against any three of them when the paperwork arrived at his door. By law he would have been served almost immediately. It took her three tries to leave she was forced to return both times be- causethesheltersshebroughtherfamilytohad two- and three-week limits respectively not even a Band-Aid in terms of resetting a life. Now with her sister she could start over but she didnt stop looking over her shoulder until 1992 when she learned he had died. When I left my ex my sister was living in Yellowknife so she had opened her home for me to come up there with the girls she said. It was far away and it was safe. When I got there the reweed was blooming all over the place and I kept saying to my sister Oh my gosh its just like home. Im from Newfound- landoriginallysolotsofreweedlotsofrocks lots of short scruffy trees and lots of water. Fitzpatrick who prefers to be called Maria broughtherfellowMLAstotheirfeetwhenshe shared her story while speaking in support of Bill 204 which makes it easier for a person to leave an abusive relationship by allowing a lease to be broken early without penalty. Proof of domestic violence can be presented to a landlord in several forms including a state- ment from a social worker nurse physician psychologist or police ofcer or a court-issued emergency protection or restraining order. SeveralMLAsmenandwomencommended Fitzpatrick for bravely sharing the details of her abusive nine-year marriage. All of them voted in favour of the bill which was tabled by Independent MLA Deborah Drever. Fitz- patrick is a New Democrat. New Democrat MLA Shaye Anderson said the RCMP estimate they will respond to 427 domestic violence calls in Leduc this year but that incidents are underreported by as much as 80 per cent meaning there could be more than 2000 such calls in the town. Families in Leduc-Beaumont can go to the closest womens shelter which is the Cam- rose Womens Shelter but they need the abil- ity to break a lease without penalty in order to move on he said. Calgary-Mountain View MLA and Liberal Leader Dr. David Swann reached back to 1996 to groundbreaking legislation the Victims of Domestic Violence Act which made it possi- ble for a victim to obtain an emergency pro- tection order granting exclusive occupation of his or her residence for a specied period. An EPO is one of the documents that could be used to break a lease early under Bill 204. Importantly former Edmonton MLA Alice Hansons private members bill ac- knowledged that perhaps the greatest barrier victims face to escaping an abusive spouse or partner is not wanting to be on the street such a basic basic protection and disincen- tive Swann said. A tiny huge piece of the puzzle Fitzpatrick has shared her story before with other women and womens groups she was involved with but not publicly. I talked to my daughters because I thought it would end up on Facebook but I really didnt think it was going to go viral. Yesterday morning I received an email from a friend of mine who is in Africa and he had seen it. She told her colleagues in the legislature her childrenwerescarredforlifeandshewouldhave beenhorriedifasingleonevotedagainstthe bill which passed unanimously. She told the Journalitisalittletinypieceoftheapproach to ending family violence that would be huge for someone trying to escape an abusive home andwouldmakeanimpactinsmallandremote communities where social services are sparse. I was familiar with lots of women in the Northwhoeitherdidntleavebecausetheyhad nowhere to go or they left and they were kinda tracked down she said. If you were in a com- munity like Cambridge Bay youre not driving out of there. Youre there and everybody in the communitymayknowaboutitandpeoplewould take sides. You could still be at great risk. Fitzpatrick has spoken to Drever about the next piece of legislation that should be drafted and presented as early as the next sitting in February. Ideally we should reach a point where we dont have to have shelters for anybody thats being abused she said. But I dont think thats going to happen in my lifetime. My abuse ended in 1981 and here we are 30 years later and its still an issue. In fact we have way more womens shelters in Alberta than we did at that time. The shelters in Ed- monton last year got 50000 calls. You cant even wrap your head around that. MLAs survivor story brings legislature to feet PhotocourtestoftheGovernmentofAlberta By DALI CARMICHAEL Business man father and friend John Chadi was all of these things. A three-term councillor for the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalos Ward 2 Chadi passed away on Nov. 15 after living with bile duct cancer for over two years. Chadi was originally elected to council in 1998 only a year after moving to Fort Chipewyan where he helped his father run a family-owned business. John Chadi was a friend of mine for over 25 years and you know John was always the kind of guy that would always be inter- ested about others said Ward 1 Councillor Keith McGrath. Even in his bed in hospital John would never talk about his own condi- tion his rst words and his last words were always wondering how everybody else was doing. That kind of illustrates he always cared about other people and he would never see anybody do without. Not because John has passed away but I would say the same things about John if he was alive today he genuinely cared about people. Before entering politics he gained business acumen as a car salesman in Fort McMurray experience that would be essential in his po- litical role and as the owner of several busi- nesses in Fort Chip including trucking and contracting companies Chadis Restaurant and the Wood Buffalo Liquor Store. Chadi sat on council for 10 years before being asked to step away after he missed eight consecutive weeks of council meet- ings in 2008. In 2013 he re-entered the political ring discovering he had the rare form of cancer only days after winning the election along with fellow Ward 1 Councillor Julia Cardinal. Its just sad that he died but you know he outsmarted the doctors because they only gave him a couple of months to live and he lasted a couple of years McGrath said. He fought a real good battle. In honour of his well-attended service a regularly scheduled municipal council meeting was moved back a day to allow all to give their last respects. Our thoughts and prayers are rmly with Cr. Chadis family as they mourn his pass- ing following an incredible life lived in the service of his community Mayor Melissa Blake said in a written statement. John will be deeply missed by all of us and we can only hope his family nds peace at this sad and difcult time. On behalf of Council I wish to express our sincerest condolences to Cr. Chadis family friends and the entire community. Social media messages showed anoutpour- ing of admiration for Chadi as well. Its a sad day for our region Ward 1 Coun- cillor Tyran Ault tweeted. Councillor Chadi was a great colleague friend and mentor. Truly a great man. Rest easy John. Wood Buffalo councillor father and friend dies of cancer POLITICS IN MEMORIAM Wednesday November 25 2015 7 ENVIRONMENT OILSANDS CONTEST RULES 1. Entries will consist of writing your name and phone number on the back of a receipt from local participating retailers in the amount of 30.00 or more and placing this in a designated ballot box. 2. Ballot boxes will be placed at participating retailers and emptied weekly for the draw. 3. There will be FIVE WEEKLY DRAWS with the first draw on November 18 for prizes donated by local businesses. 4. The GRAND PRIZE of two tickets to Edmonton will be drawn from all of the weekly entries on December 23. 5. Winners will be notified by phone and prize winners will be posted on Facebook. 6. Chamber Executive members are not eligible for prizes. Thank you to the following businesses for their kind donation of prizes for the Shop Local Campaign THEBACHA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Northern Stores Kaesers Stores TDC Wallys Drugs Bank of Montreal Hobart and Mum Shear FunStreet Treats Northwestern Air Lease Please remember that each purchase from a local business provides employment for residents as well as offering services for residents and visitors alike. By CRAIG GILBERT The second time was a charm for Aboriginal leaders associated with an oilsands watchdog group who weeks ago walked out of a meeting withtheAlbertagovernment. TheNov.17meetingbetween Environment Minister Shan- non Phillips and the Aborigi- nal caucus of the Cumulative Environmental Management Association CEMA came as theAlbertagovernmentworks out what to do about the de- cision by oil patch companies to cease funding the not-for- prots5millionannualbud- get in 2016. For 12 years the organization has studied the effects of industry on the air earth water and biodiversity in and around Wood Buffalo regional municipality. There will always be pres- sure from industry Fort Mc- Murray Metis vice-president BillLoutittsaid.Eventhough theyvemadebillionsinprots here they continue to feel that their shareholders always re- quiremore.Wevegotnoprob- lemwiththatbutasAboriginal peoplethepeoplewerepresent areourshareholdersandwefeel theyarebeingshortchanged. InOctoberthecaucusrepre- sentingsevenFirstNationand Metiscommunitieswalkedout ofameetingwithprovincialbu- reaucratsontheprovincessus- tainabledevelopmentplanfor theareabecausetheyfeltthey were not being heard accord- ingtoLoutittwhoblamedthe clash on government inertia. The last time they were prettyadamantthatthisisthe rules and theyre going to go ahead and we were there just tolistenLoutitttoldtheJour- nalonNov.20.Therewasno opportunity for input. We felt that by staying in that meet- ingwewerejustgoingtohelp themimplementsomethingwe had no input into. Theres been a change in government and the thing is they dont change their bu- reaucrats right away so we were dealing with old bu- reaucrats. This last meet- ing they brought the assis- tant deputy minister and he was certainly a little bit more open to hearing what we had to say. InSeptemberCEMAsboard of directors voted to continue operatingdespitethelooming funding cut. Loutitt said any organization that replaces CEMA must have a gover- nance structure that allows for input on what should be researchedandagainonnal reports before they go to the provincial or federal govern- ments for policy changes. We want to provide them solutions on what we feel is necessarynotonlyduring the industrial development but whatitsgoingtolooklikeafter theyrenishedhesaid.We want input on reclamation. Weve already seen it where they reclaimed and made buffalo pasture which really doesnt help the Aboriginal people. They fence off a big area and put buffalo in and just restrict access to the ter- ritory that we used to use. Lackadaisical leadership Phillips who Loutitt de- scribedasquiteopentothefact thatchangesneedtobemade toldtheJournalonNov.19the NewDemocratsplannedtodo betteronenvironmentalmon- itoring and consultation with indigenous stakeholders than thepreviousProgressiveCon- servative government. Wehaveanumberofother piecestoputinplaceonmoni- toring and cumulative effects thatistakingalittlebitoftime shesaid.Thesearenotsmall topics and we also inherited a situation from the previous governmentwheretherewas somelackadaisicalleadership ontheirpartsoithastakenus sometimetodoastock-taking of the institutions organiza- tions and mechanisms that are on the ground and how we can do better. She said indigenous con- sultation and environmental monitoring were the main subjects she discussed with federal Environment Minis- ter Catherine McKenna who was in Edmonton on Nov. 18. Our commitment to Ab- original groups is we would ensure that CEMAs best work is carried forward she said. The organization may not be precisely in its current formsimplybecausewehave a number of other challenges fromthepreviousgovernment but we are working on how to put together a framework that will work for everyone mindful of the fact we have to embark on a respectful en- gagementandparticipationof indigenous people. Thereareabacklogofcon- cerns in the Lower Athabasca that have been waiting for ac- tionwhichrequirecarefuland thoughtful attention. Moving too quickly in an area where there are a number of other jobs and impacts and so on is notourapproachsowevebeen takingourtimewiththisone. Loutitt said the Aboriginal caucusadministrativestaffis working with the province on what the successor to CEMA mightlooklikeandthataplan is being developed. Industry groups have long argued that CEMA should be folded into another organiza- tion like the Joint Canada- Alberta Implementation Plan for Oil Sands Monitoring but CEMA is the only organiza- tion that takes input from in- digenous stakeholders. They are very industry- heavyorganizationsthatwork withgovernmentLoutittsaid. A lot of the time when some- one is paying for the report they denitely make sure it is one-sided or not all the facts arelaidout.Traditionalknowl- edge has to be involved. Our Aboriginal groups First Na- tionandMetisareverytightly aligned on the environment stuff.Wedohaverightsandif you dont take care of the en- vironment rights arent very much good when it comes to huntingandshingandaccess totheland.Thesearetheareas wereallyndaredetrimental to the Aboriginal people. Reboot Aboriginal leaders talk CEMA with Phillips Members representing the Aboriginal caucus of the Cumulative Environmental Management Association CEMA met with the Alberta environment minister at the provincial legislature on Nov. 17. PhotocourtesyofBillLoutitt Prior to his retirement from Aurora College in Fort Smith Northwest Territories he was employed as a carpentry in- structor for thirty years. Dun- can was always there to give a helping hand to everyone that sought his assistance and ad- vice for any project they may have had. His humor charmed many students and his car- pentry experience assisted to fulll their career goals. Duncan Doug loved to spend quality time with his family and friends and upon retirement found many new friends in Arizona where he loved to spend his quiet and peaceful winters with his lov- ing wife of 44 years and many new found friends. For a num- ber of years preceding his retirement and for the years after Duncan has touched the lives of many many people young and old with the spirit of Christmas. With great sup- port from his wife and chil- dren and the communities of Fort Smith and Tonopah he constructed a Santa sleigh in both the Northwest Territories and in Arizona in which he and his wife would spend the Christmas season spreading Duncan MacPherson 1948-2015 happiness and well being to all. Through the MacClaus sleigh Christmas was made of wood wire and a great big heart. Duncans death was a re- sult of an accident while work- ing on his passion the Mac- Claus sleigh that brought so much happiness to so many people. Duncan is survived by his wife Carol Catherine Ranni MacPherson. Sons Glen Michelle of St. Albert Alberta Craig Kim of Fort Smith Northwest Territories Nick Donna of St. Johns Newfoundland daughter Maureen Aaron Kikoak of Fort Smith NT as well as twelve grandchildren Doug- las Randall Isabella Tristan Dylan Ashton Logan Triton Madison Kieran Taylor and Amelia. He also leaves be- hind his sisters Marie Charlie Cash Judy Sandy Morrison and brother Mike. He will be greatly missed by all. Cremation has taken place and at a later time memorial services will be held in Cape Breton Nova Scotia as well as Fort Smith Northwest Territories and Tonopah Arizona. It is with heavy hearts that we the family announce the passing of Duncan Doug Joseph MacPherson on Wednesday November 18 2015 in Goodyear Arizona. Born in Sydney Nova Scotia on June 5 1948 He was the son of the late Duncan and Alberta Maddox MacPherson. 8 Wednesday November 25 2015 October Chilly Fall Evening at the Treeline Greenstockings Lake by Sandra Moore January Following the Caribou Trail Selwyn Lake by Miriam Korner February Pond Hockey Blachford Lake by Leanne Robinson April Spring time on Prosperous Lake Yellowknife by Leanne Robinson May Wander Without Purpose Back Bay Great Slave Lake by Jan Barbier July Frost Creek Nahanni National Park Reserve by Adam Zier-Vogel August Cirque of the Unclimbables Nahanni National Park Reserve by Adam Zier-Vogel November Moosehide Fun at Wldeh by Barb Cameron Yellowknife River by Barb Cameron Wednesday November 25 2015 9 September Feeling a Bit Small South Shore Great Slave Lake by Adam Hill January - Following the Caribou Trail by Miriam Krner At the end of the gravel road past the northern most community in Saskatchewan a trail leads into the NWT and beyond. For days we had followed this old route carved into the collective memory of the people of the North. The cold was wearing on the dogs and us and we talked about turning south. Then suddenly the last skidoo track was left behind. White silence embraced us and we found ourselves on a trail as old as the land itself the caribou trail. All thoughts of turning home disappeared and what was left was the pull to follow the caribou. North. February - Pond Hockey by Leanne Robinson There is something about pond hockey that has an allure to it that hockey on an indoor rink is lacking. I had never really played hockey nor had any interest in it before moving here but then again I had never tried it on a lake. It is a different sport and now some- thing that I love. This particular rink is at Blachford Lake Lodge where I spent a wonder- ful few days at a learning retreat hosted by the NWT Recreation and Parks Association. I didnt get a game in that time though as in a few short weeks our son would be born. March - Suppertime by Miriam Krner Dogs are the most amazing travel companions. They instinctively know the land. They might follow on old wolf track hidden under the snow to the next portage crouch on their bellies when the ice feels unsafe under their paws and nestle at night in a bed of snow. They comfort us with their never ceasing enthusiasm allow us to warm up our frozen hands in their warm armpits. Suppertime is our time to say thank you for a days hard work. April - Spring time on Prosperous Lake by Leanne Robinson Everything changes so quickly in spring. One week you are skiing across the lake the next week you are paddling. This particular day we ventured to Tartan Rapids for a picnic with a friend from out of town. Naturally as we had a visitor in tow we tried to pretend that this was a typical day and that we always walked across the lake drag- ging our canoe with our sleeping baby inside. But of course these blissful spring days where the line between ice and water is marred happen but a few days a year. May - Wander Without Purpose by Janice Stein Yellowknife I am very fortunate to call the Northwest Territories my home and this beautiful land my backyard. I was once told that home isnt where you are from but where you be- long. Whether exploring on my own or with family or friends camping for a week or kayaking for just the day sailing in 30 or snowshoeing in -50. The land has always offered me an escape and a chance to explore grow and play. The land is not a place I visit. Its a place I call home. June - Bug Hunting by Daniel Harrington They were stopping to inspect various somethings along the rocks. Collecting skip- ping stones shells then bugs so I documented their ndings. A couple caterpillars a couple snails and an injured dragony later the large clouds behind us had rolled in and we called it a day. We left taking the dragony and its friends along with us. July - Frost Creek by Adam Zier-Vogel Frost Creek Valley is one of Nahanni National Park Reserves hidden gems. Tucked away in the Ragged Range this stunning area has a quality that is simultaneously soothing and exciting begging to be explored. Lush rolling alpine meadows abound with marmots ground squirrels and pika surrounded by pristine lakes and streams. Truly a northern Shangri-la August - Cirque of the Unclimbables by Adam Zier-Vogel Rugged remote and wild in my opinion Nahanni National Park Reserves Cirque of the Unclimbables is one of the best places on the planet for an adventure in the mountains. Seeing the Cirques towering granite faces and spires from this perspec- tive never fails to leave me in awe. September - Feeling a Bit Small by Adam Hill Sometimes when you go out looking for photos of the aurora its hard to look at them purely as a photographic subject. They are after all amazing curtains and ribbons of light swirling all around you. Its amazing that this phenomenon exists. Sometimes you have to just look up and realize how amazing a world we live in and how small we are in it. October - Chilly Fall Evening at the Treeline by Sandra Moore I cant think of a more welcoming sight than camp at nightfall. This picture was taken in early September. Cold enough to need a re in the wood stove but mild enough to walk on the esker and enjoy the fall colours in the evening light. Thinking ahead to to- morrow Ill go shing berry picking and maybe hike to an old wolf den to take photos. November - Moosehide Fun by Barb Cameron My three-year-old son Charlie is climbing on this tightly stretched moosehide clutch- ing a moosehide ball. He was having so much fun playing alongside older students who were learning rst-hand about working with hides at the Wldeh camp. It was a memorable on-the-land experience with Yellownives Dene First Nation Elder Ju- dith Charlo and her daughter Verna Crapeau. They shared their knowledge of tanning a hide from start to nish with hundreds of students. Their teachings were inspira- tional showing how to get the job done with a balance of honest hard work while al- lowing for the amusement of a youngster. December - Christmas Harvest by Rich McIntosh Pulling up a net full of whitesh on Yellowknife Bay was the perfect gift over Christ- mas holidays. The temperatures ash froze the sh but the light was incredibly warm. 2016 CPAWS Love the Land calendar winning photos March Suppertime Selwyn Lake by Miriam Korner June Cover Bug Hunting Alexandra Falls by Daniel Harrington December Christmas Harvest Yellowknife Bay Great Slave Lake by Rich McIntosh 10 Wednesday November 25 2015 INDUSTRY MINING Christian Leadership Training SALT Bible College starts its second term in January 2016 CERTIFICATE AND DIPLOMA PROGRAMS in ministry leadership Call 867-872-8151 and ask for SALT or mail us at SALT co Box 1101 Fort Smith NT X0E 0P0 By CRAIG GILBERT The government of the Northwest Territo- ries hopes to buy low and sell high with its newly acquired North American Tungsten Corporation Ltd. property. On Nov. 16 the Supreme Court of British Columbia approved the sale of the compa- nys property in the Selwyn mountain range in an area straddling the border between Yukon and the Northwest Territories to the GNWT which also acquired lease-holder interests to mineral rights in both the NWT and the Yukon. The property is the worlds largest tung- sten deposit outside of China and will be sold when the price of tungsten rebounds to ensure cost recovery of the purchase as well as any other debt the GNWT may incur throughout the process. Cabinet made an offer on the property in October and approval by the court last Tues- day forced the GNWT to announce the sale during the election period. A spokesperson told the Journal no members of the execu- tive committee would comment on the sale because they are prohibited from speaking as cabinet ministers during the transition period between assemblies. The decision to make the offer to purchase during the election period was required by the pace of proceedings in the BC Supreme Court and was beyond the GNWTs ability to control the statement read. The GNWT was authorized to commit funding for the offer through a Special Warrant that will be re- ported to the 18th Legislative Assembly in a supplementary appropriation bill. Members of the 18th Legislative Assembly will be of- fered a brieng on the decision as soon as possible after it is convened. The warrant was issued by the Commis- sioner on the recommendation of the Finan- cial Management Board that the expenditure was according to the Financial Administra- tion Act urgently required in the pub- lic interest and there was no appropriate or insufcient appropriation to incur the expenditure. Under the devolution agreement the gov- ernment of Canada has assumed responsi- bility for the Cantung Mine. The GNWT will also transfer to Canada the GNWTs rights to the substantial funds held in trust as se- curity in respect of Cantung Mine. The court also extended the stay in NATCs proceedings under the Companies Creditors Arrangement Act CCAA until Mar. 31 of next year authorized certain equipment financers to take possession of certain equipment the company does not require for care and maintenance op- erations and expanded the powers of Al- varez Marsal Canada Inc. the court- appointed monitor. NATC led for court protection under the CCAA on June 9. In July the company sought court approval of a sale and solici- tation process to market and sell the assets of the company but no acceptable offers were received. The tungsten mill at the Cantung mine site was shut down on Oct. 26 according to the company and transition of the Can- tung mine to care and maintenance was expected to be completed on or about No- vember 18. The federal government will fund the companys environmental care and main- tenance activities at the Cantung mine site which will take place under the supervision of the monitor. Kurt Heikkila Dennis Lindahl and Ronald Erickson have resigned from the companys board of directors Heikkila has resigned as CEO and Lindahl has resigned as Chief Fi- nancial Ofcer. The GNWT had three main reasons for acquiring the mineral rights according to a statement To help to assure that Canada would take responsibility for the Cantung Mine To protect and preserve GNWT security interests in the property and To protect the economic potential of the Mactung resource for future sale. The GNWTs offer to purchase the Mactung property was set at a maximum of 4.5 mil- lion but the nal cost is expected to be lower once the value of CCAA related charges have been deducted. According to the petition NATC filed with the B.C. Supreme Court in June the Vancouver-based company has 84.4 mil- lion in liabilities 14 million of which are unsecured and an estimated book value of 27.9 million. It owes around 75.5 million to over 200 creditors. For the six months ended March 31 2015 NATC experienced a net loss of 6.6 million the document states. NATCs cash balances are extremely low and additional or replace- ment nancing will likely be required. By CRAIG GILBERT Albertas new climate change action plan was roundly praised when Premier Rachel Notley released it Sunday Nov. 22. The plan phases coal power generation by 2030 caps oil sands emissions and installs an economy-wide carbon tax of 20 per tonne in 2017 and 30 per tonne in 2018. The tax will be fully reinvested into mea- sures that reduce pollution including clean technology renewable energy and energy ef- ciency and also to provide transition help to individuals and families small businesses Indigenous communities and people work- ing in the coal industry. It will add 300 to the cost of heating a home in its rst year. If the plan is approved renewable energy sources will comprise up to 30 per cent of Al- bertaselectricityproductionby2030.Anover- all oilsands emission limit of 100 megatonnes will be set with provisions for new upgrading andco-generation.Incollaborationwithindus- tryenvironmentalorganizationsandaffected First Nations Alberta will also implement a methane reduction strategy to reduce emis- sions by 45 per cent from 2014 levels by 2025. A portion of collected revenues will be in- vested directly into measures to reduce pollu- tionincludingcleanenergyresearchandtech- nology green infrastructure such as public transitandprogramstohelpAlbertansreduce their energy use according to the province. The plan drew praise from former United States vice president and climate change ad- vocate Al Gore who called it a powerful sig- nal that humanity is beginning to win our struggle to solve the climate crisis. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau tweeted the plan was a very positive step in the ght against climate change. His environment minister Catherine McK- enna was in Edmonton last week meeting with Alberta Environment Minister Shan- non Phillips. Phillips told the Journal the approaches of both previous Conservative governments had failed. Theysucceededingettingapprovalforpre- cisely zero pipelines and they did not succeed in persuading anyone that their approach to the environment was in any way credible she said. So its refreshing to have a partner with whom we can work productively and I further am quite pleased they are going to allow the provinces to chart their own way on this matter. The plan is based on the advice of the Cli- mateChangeAdvisoryPanelledbyDr.Andrew Leachwhichheardfromthousandsofindivid- ualAlbertansandstakeholdergroupsinthefall. CanadianNaturalResourcesLimitedoneof the largest independent crude oil and natural gasproducersintheworldsaidtheannounce- mentwasasignicantstepforwardforAlberta. We appreciate the strong leadership dem- onstrated by Premier Notley and her govern- ment chair Murray Edwards said in a state- ment. The framework announced will allow ongoing innovation and technology invest- ment in the oil and natural gas sector. In this way we will do our part to address climate change while protecting jobs and industry competitiveness in Alberta. Wildrose Opposition Leader Brian Jean said the plan puts a tax on everything and could hurt the economy. ThepartysaidproofthiswillhitAlbertafam- ilies and businesses hard is in the adjustment fund to help small businesses cope. Unlike British Columbia which takes its carbontaxandusesittolowerincometaxesfor all the vast majority of Albertans and Alberta businesseswillonlytakeahitinthisplan.Jean said. This new carbon tax will make almost everysingleAlbertafamilypoorerwhileaccel- erated plans to shut down coal plants will lead tohigherpowerpricesandfurtherjobslosses. Though he approved of the plan in general Liberal Leader David Swann also expressed concern over the adjustment fund. These are the largest question marks that the government needs to provide answers on Swann said. We need to know what the pro- cess will be for this adjustment fund to make sure there isnt undue hardship on lower in- come families and small businesses. Taxpayers take on Cantung mine Mactung property ENVIRONMENT CLIMATE CHANGE Gore calls Alberta climate plan a powerful signal for humanity Wednesday November 25 2015 11 Santa Claus arrives in Yellowknife PhotosBillbradenandDaliCarmichael Kids of all ages in Yellowknife enjoyed a mild night out with the elves as the territorial capital held its annual Santa Claus Parade Saturday evening Nov. 21. Even the critters joined in hitching on the Northern Frontier Visitors Association float. Isolde Driedeger gazes with wonder over the crowds that lined Yellowknifes Frankiln Avenue.Lego my costume Toques and gloves were barely needed in the relatively forgiving weather. Say it in 25 words or less for only 3.50 Extra words are 20 centseach.Businessclassifieds are 10 for 30 words and 25 centsforeach additionalword. Email your advertising to adsnorj.ca or fax it to 872-2754 or call 872-3000 ext. 26 FOR SALE FIREWOOD. Cus- tom cut sizes - split green dry bagged. Wood Gasification Outdoor wood boilers. Delivery from Fort Smith to Hay River Yellowknife. Contact Dave at 867 872-3435 or cell 872-0229 or email dhehnnorthwestel. net. UFN FORT SMITH CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING BLANKET CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Blanket advertising reaches all 122 weekly newspapers in Alberta and the NWT with a combined circulation of over a million readers. 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Customizable and secure. 12345 12345 3 wide version 3.75 wide version Place your ad in this newspaper and province wide with a combined circulation of over 800000 for only... 995plus GSTHST Value Ad Network Alberta Weekly Newspapers Association toll free 1-800-282-6903 x228 email andreaawna.com or visit this community newspaper the most out of your advertising dollarssqueeze Place your ad in this newspaper and province wide with a combined circulation of over 800000 for only... 995plus GSTHST Value Ad Network Alberta Weekly Newspapers Association toll free 1-800-282-6903 x228 email andreaawna.com or visit this community newspaper the most out of your advertising dollarssqueeze ram-value-ad.indd 1 72511 1230 PM EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY GROUNDS MAINTENANCE SUPERVISOR Yellowknife NT Description Outdoor work in winter and summer and requires Organize and direct planting of trees gardens and lawns Work under pressure Handling heavy loads Physically demanding Manual dexterity Attention to detail Tight deadlines Duties Plan and estimate labour and materials Maintain work records and logs Hire supervise and schedule staff Read blueprints and drawings Remuneration 17 per hour Area of Specialization Landscape construction Grounds maintenance Design Specific Skills Resolve work related problems Requisition or order materials equipment and supplies Repair and maintain equipment Plan and direct grounds maintenance Organize and direct construction of fences decks and walls Establish work schedules and procedures Plan manage and supervise landscape construction work Position will require ability to supervise 3-4 people and requires excellent oral communication. Permanent position - 5 years experience required. Contact Joncavo.ca for more information. EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY The Dehcho First Nations are negotiating with Canada and the GNWT towards an agreement on lands resources and governance which will reflect our nation-to-nation treaty relationship. We want a unique agreement which respects our responsibility as stewards of our whole territory while recognizing the Dehcho Government as the primary government for all residents of the Dehcho. The negotiations have so far produced most of a draft Agreement-in-Principle but some major decisions relating to lands and resources must still be addressed. We are seeking a Chief Negotiator who demonstrates a clear understanding of Dehcho Dene worldview history and current negotiations issues. Reporting to the Dehcho Leadership the Chief Negotiator will lead the negotiations team and be responsible for overseeing all aspects of negotiations including Direct and participate in main table sessions Prepare work plan for main table negotiations Draft positioninterest papers for the DFN leadership Prepare position documents for on-going negotiations Maintain appropriate liaison with government departments ministries agencies and other interested groups Responsible for implementing a communication plan Other related duties as directed by the DFN leadership Qualifications Understanding and use of Dehcho Dene culture and language is an asset At least 5-10 years experience in land claims and self-government negotiations at senior level or equivalent experience Minimum 5 year experience managing senior staff contractors and budgets Superior written and oral communication skills Salary benefits negotiable and commensurate with experience. Please provide a cover letter resume and the names and contact information of 3 professional references to Alison De Pelham Executive Director Dehcho First Nation Fort Simpson NT X0E 0N0 Deadline December 3 2015 For information regarding the Dehcho Process see www.dehcho.org Only those selected for further consideration will be contacted. CHIEF NEGOTIATOR DEHCHO PROCESS Advertising and marketing Book design Brochures posters Business cardsStationery Logo design Photography Promo material Signs Banners Stickers Magnets Wedding invitations Contact Cascade Graphics at 867 872-3000 or graphicsnorj.ca 207 McDougal Rd Fort Smith NT We offer a range of custom design services cascade graphics FOR SALE 2008 FORD RANGER 4X4 Low KMs Stick shift. 12K or BO. Must be seen to be appreciated For information contact Don at 872-3511 donnorj.ca 867 872 - 3000 ext. 26 effective stylish advertising call Your business in print 14 Wednesday November 25 2015 POLITICS AGRICULTURE WESCLEAN NORTHERN SALES WESCLEAN NORTHERN SALES is the NWTs first choice for Janitorial and Industrial Supplies Flooring Paint and Wallcoverings Premium Wood Pellet Sales and Door to Door Truck Courier Service WESCLEAN 15 Industrial Drive Hay River NT Tel 875-5100 Fax 875-5115 www.wescleannwt.com Flooring Area Rugs Paint Window Coverings Janitorial Supplies W ESCLEA N N.W.T. HURRY IN Sale ends Nov. 27 Flooring Area Rugs Paint Window Coverings Janitorial Supplies interior design headquarters Buffalo Express AIR Toll-free 1 800 465-3168 salesbuffaloairexpress.com www.buffaloairexpress.com Yellowknife - 867 765-6002 Hay River - 867 874-3307 Edmonton - 780 455-9283 WE SERVICE ALL POINTS IN THE NWT that are accessible by commercial aircraft. Ask about our TRUCK AIR EXPRESS RATESTruck Air Express trucks from Edmonton and Calgary and flies out of Yellowknife. By CRAIG GILBERT New legislation extending workplace pro- tections to farms and ranches needs to be put back in the stable according to Albertas of- cial opposition. The Enhanced Protection for Farm and Ranch Workers Act or Bill 6 was introduced in the legislature last week. If approved the law would ensure that 60000 farm and ranch workers in Alberta will have the same basic protections that other workers in the province have received for decades according to a government press release. Everyone deserves a safe fair and healthy workplace Minister of Jobs Skills Training and Labour Lori Sigurdson said. The rules we implement must respect the unique quali- ties of the farm and ranch industry and I look forward to working with industry members to develop rules that make sense. The New Democrat government argues its high time to update the rules noting the provinces Workers Compensation Act 1918 is approaching its centennial Albertas rst comprehensive labour relations legisla- tion came into effect in 1938 and the Occu- pational Health and Safety Act was imple- mented in 1976. Changes would include Ensuring farms and ranches are subject to Occupational Health and Safety legis- lation to prevent incidents that can result in injury or death. Providing Workers Compensation Board insurance coverage so workers can con- tinue to support their families if they are injured on the job and protecting farm and ranch owners against the impact of workplace injuries and illness. Including farms and ranches in Employ- ment Standards and Labour Relations legislation. Farm and ranch workers will be protected by the Occupational Health and Safety Act and regulations and Workers Compensation Board coverage for farm and ranch work- ers will be mandatory beginning January 1. Changes to Albertas Employment Stan- dards and Labour Relations legislation will come into effect in the spring of 2016 follow- ing consultations with industry regarding exemptions that may be needed for unique circumstances such as seeding or harvesting. According to the government it will work with industry over the next year to develop detailed occupational health and safety tech- nical rules for farms and ranches. The rules are expected to be in place in 2017. We know Albertas farmers and ranchers are concerned about providing safe and fair workplaces and I look forward to our discus- sions with them as we work out the details on the best way to do it Agriculture and Forest Minister Oneil Carlier said. Dippers put cart in front of horse Wildrose Wildrose jobs critic Grant Hunter said in a release that those consultations should al- ready have happened. No one in Alberta cares more about safety on family farms than the moms and dads who run them he said. They are the experts and they need to have their voices heard on these important changes happening under sudden timelines. The NDP need to put this bill to committee instead of pushing it through in less than 45 days so Albertans farmers and industry are properly consulted. Wildrosehadpetitionedforaccommodations forsmallfamilyfarmsthatwouldbeimpacted by these changes Hunter continued but the newlegislationdoesnotincludeany.Theparty pointedoutthatinBritishColumbiaworkplace safetylegislationmakesacleardistinctionbe- tween large operators and family farms. A farmer himself Wildrose agriculture critic Rick Strankman said education is key to making farms safer. Farmers are the most passionate about en- suring farms stay safe but more can be done to provide education for families and small operations Strankman said. Nothing can be moreeffectiveandensurerealpositivechanges occur on farms across Alberta. Liberal Leader David Swann on the other handwasunabashedinhissupportofthebill. Opposition to this bill is opposition to a farm worker being able to refuse unsafe work it is opposition to any minimum wage what- soever for farm workers it is opposition to re- strictions on child labour it is opposition to requiring proper safety training before doing a new task and it is opposition to the protec- tions of WCB for farm workers and farm own- ers he said also in a press release. The days of a legal framework that would make Charles Dickens blush will at long last come to an end in Alberta. It is a great day indeed. New Democrats rushed ranch safety act Opposition PhotocourtesyoftheGovernmentofAlberta Jobs Skills Training and Labour Minister Lori Sigurdson and Agriculture and Forest Minister Oneil Carlier right with Dan and Mike Kalisvaart of Kalco Farms near Gibbons on Nov. 17. Wednesday November 25 2015 15 OP-ED AGRICULTURE 6.8103 in x 6.3125 in By KIM RAPATI This is not the article I expected to write but recent events have lit up lightbulbs that I have to share. Something really stood out while I was listening to a CBC interview the other day the interviewee said that there is one thing that is similar about all the people who attacked Paris and it is not their race religion or nationality it is their youth. They were all young people. This realization shocked and horried ... what has happened that there are so many unattached and hope- less young people who have turned to such extremism Well that brought to mind the presentation our Savory Hub leader from Turkey gave at a recent conference which was titled Best Time for a Youthful Revolution. Durukan Dudu is one of the most energetic and inspiring young men I have ever met. He lives in a highly di- verse fractured and vibrant context. I believe we have assumptions about what young people want he said. I asked this young person who was curious about my life what is it that you want from your life And she told me these ve things she wants to work hard and towards something that she can see is making things better she wants all her efforts to be recognized she wants to have a joyful social life where she can connect with others and she wants compensation for what she does. Thats it. She didnt even say money just compensation. What separates us from what people think of us is that what we seek is to have a meaningful life. A little note the she Durukan mentioned in his speech was actually my good friend from Edmonton Denika Piggott. She works for ALUS Alberta Alternative Land Use Sys- tems which is a program that communities administer in which they pay farmers in their areaforecosystemservicesthattheyprovide aslargelandowners.Thismeansfarmershave anincentivetoprotectwetlandsconservespe- cialwildlife habitatregenerate soilandpeople near them are recognizing that their work is important. Check it out at alus.ca. Durukan talked about how his farm edu- cation centres aim is to capture and fulll that youthful need that is going unfullled to work for something bigger than ourselves to be acknowledged for our skills and to live a life connected with others. I wonder if could have grabbed the attention of those other young people who turned to extremism Desertication all over the world is causing poverty and war. Young people all over the world are disengaged and feeling their life is without purpose. Farmers everywhere are ap- proaching retirement and the next generation to work their farm is not there. Something that can tie all of these things together young people learning about regenerative farming that creates enduring returns and ts into their social context. This is something we can do here in Hay River and through the Savory Network all over the world. On that note there are over 190 nations meeting in a few weeks at the Paris climate change negotiations leaders who are work- ing for a solution to our collective world problems. What if we all worked to put car- bon back in the soil while growing food and employing young people to rejuvenate their landscapes Daniela Ibarra-Howell who is the CEO of the Savory Institute is heading there to represent the Savory Network and is bringing a Soil Manifesto signed by our network and our friends all over which urges leaders to consider soil and the hopeful po- tential it has. Please join us in celebrating this and signing the Soil Manifesto. You can do it online at httpsavory.globalsoilforclimate or come to the Soil for Climate event in Hay River Dec. 4 at the Library at 7 p.m. Is it crazy that we can do something from our homes here in the Northwest Territories that will be brought to international leader- ship and potentially have a great impact on our beautiful complex and intimately con- nected earth We can do it Kim Rapati is the operations manager at the Northern Farm Training Institute in Hay River. Time for a Revolution on Paris soil and young farmers Participants in the youth leadership summit at the Northern Farm Training Institute in Hay River take in the sights on a break from programming. PhotocourtesyofKimRapati 16 Wednesday November 25 2015 Vehiclesmaybeshownwithoptionalequipment.Dealermaysellorleaseforless.Limitedtimeoffers.Offersonlyvalidatparticipatingdealers.Retailoffersmaybecancelledorchangedatanytimewithoutnotice.SeeyourFordDealerforcompletedetailsorcalltheFordCustomerRelationshipCentreat1-800-565-3673.ForfactoryordersacustomermayeithertakeadvantageofeligibleraincheckableFord retailcustomerpromotionalincentivesoffersavailableatthetimeofvehiclefactoryorderortimeofvehicledeliverybutnotbothorcombinationsthereof.RetailoffersnotcombinablewithanyCPAGPCorDailyRentalincentivestheCommercialUpfitProgramortheCommercialFleetIncentiveProgramCFIP.OffervalidbetweenOctober1andNovember302015theOfferPeriodtoCanadianresidents. Receive500towardsthepurchaseorleaseofanew2015FordFusionMustangexcluding50thAnniversaryEditionTaurusFlexExplorerExpeditionTransitConnectE-SeriesCutawayTransitVanWagonTransitCutawayChassisCabF-150RegularCabF-150SuperCrewor750towardsthepurchaseorleaseofanew2015FordEscapeF-150SuperCabF-250toF-550allF-150Raptormodels excludedeachanEligibleVehicle.Onlyone1bonusoffermaybeappliedtowardsthepurchaseorleaseofone1EligibleVehicle.Taxespayablebeforeofferamountisdeducted.Offerisnotraincheckable.OfferonlyvalidfromNovember32015toJanuary42016theOfferPeriodtoresidentCanadianswithaneligibleCostcomembershiponorbeforeOctober312015.Receive1000towards thepurchaseorleaseofanew20152016FordexcludingFiestaFocusC-MAXGT350GT500F-150Raptor50thAnniversaryEditionMustangMustangShelby350350RandMediumTruckmodeleachanEligibleVehicle.Limitone1offerpereachEligibleVehiclepurchaseorleaseuptoamaximumoftwo2separateEligibleVehiclesalesperCostcoMembershipNumber.Offeristransferable topersonsdomiciledwithaneligibleCostcomember.ApplicabletaxescalculatedbeforeCAD1000offerisdeducted.RegisteredtrademarkofPriceCostcoInternationalInc.usedunderlicense.UntilJanuary42016receive02.491.494.49APRpurchasefinancingonnew2015FordF-150Escapemodelsforupto72months2016FordExplorerFocusmodelsforupto60monthstoqualified retailcustomersonapprovedcreditOACfromFordCredit.Notallbuyerswillqualifyforthelowestinterestrate.Example2015FordF-150SuperCrewSuperCabEscape2016FordExplorerFocusfor4137338280359862248527557after1000downpaymentorequivalenttrade-inandManufacturerRebatesof3750475017507505000deductedandincludingfreightandairtaxchargesof XXXXpurchasefinancedat02.491.494.49APRfor6072monthsmonthlypaymentis567525428530379thesumoftwelve12monthlypaymentsdividedby26periodsgivespayeeabi-weeklypaymentof262243245175198interestcostofborrowingisXorAPRof02.491.494.49andtotaltoberepaidisXX000.Taxespayableonfullamountofpurchaseprice.ManufacturerRebates havebeendeducted.DownpaymentmayberequiredbasedonapprovedcreditfromFordCredit.AllpurchasefinanceoffersincludefreightandairtaxchargesbutexcludeoptionsfreightexceptinQuebecACTaxexceptinQuebecGreenLevyifapplicableandexceptinQuebeclicensefuelfillchargeinsurancedealerPDIexceptinQuebecPPSAiffinancedorleasedamaximumRDPRMfeeof 44andthirdpartyservicefeeof4forQuebecifleasedadministrationfeesexceptinQuebecandanyotherapplicableenvironmentalchargesfeesexceptinOntarioandQuebecandtaxes.AllpricesarebasedonManufacturersSuggestedRetailPrice.Purchaseanew2015FordF-150ScrewcabEscape2016FordExplorerFocusfor4137338280359862248527557afterManufacturer Rebatesof3750475017507505000deducted.Taxespayableonfullamountofpurchaseprice.ManufacturerRebateshavebeendeducted.OfferincludeschargesforfreightandairtaxbutexcludesoptionsfreightexceptinQuebecACTaxexceptinQuebecGreenLevyifapplicableandexceptinQuebeclicensefuelfillchargeinsurancedealerPDIexceptinQuebecPPSAiffinancedor leasedamaximumRDPRMfeeof44andthirdpartyservicefeeof4forQuebecifleasedadministrationfeesexceptinQuebecandanyotherapplicableenvironmentalchargesfeesexceptinOntarioandQuebecandtaxes.NoteEnsurethislistofchargesisgroupedtodistinguishwhatisindeedincludedandexcludedfromagivenoffer.AllpricesarebasedonManufacturersSuggestedRetailPrice. 2015SiriusCanadaInc.SiriusXMtheSiriusXMlogochannelnamesandlogosaretrademarksofSiriusXMRadioInc.andareusedunderlicence.2015FordMotorCompanyofCanadaLimited.Allrightsreserved. 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Vehicle RV Sales Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Matt Morse Sales Leasing etzer easing DonneLeeJungkind Vehicle RV Sales LorrainePeterson Fleet Manager Tina Financ 2013 F150 SuperCab XLT 4x4 MSRP 40049 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2561 SALE PRICE 28238 MSRP Delivery Allowance Kingland Discount SALE PRICE f 2013 F-150 SuperCrew I3T664 MSRP Delivery Allowance Kingland Discount SALE PRICE 2 2013 Focus TITANIUM 0 down 220 5.6 nanced bi-weekly for 60 I3A08 2013 F150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 MSRP 43349 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2957 SALE PRICE 31142 0 down 278 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months 0 down 252 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months CallTinyToday forPre-approval 1-800-661-0716 E-mail us to subscribe to our quarterly newsletter inquirykinglandford.com 0 down only 399 nanced bi-weekly for KINGLAND FORD SALES LTD 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867-874-7716 E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.com Tina Duggan Finance Manager Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Lorraine Peterson Fleet Manager Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Matt Morse Sales Leasing DonneLeeJungkind Vehicle RV Sales LorrainePeterson Fleet Manager Tina Melv Finance Man 2013 F150 SuperCab XLT 4x4 MSRP 40049 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2561 SALE PRICE 28238 MSRP Delivery Allowance Kingland Discount SALE PRICE 45f 2013 F-150 SuperCrew Fx4 I3T664 MSRP 2 Delivery Allowance Kingland Discount SALE PRICE 233 2013 Focus TITANIUM 0 down 220 5.69 nanced bi-weekly for 60 mont I3A08 2013 F150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 MSRP 43349 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2957 SALE PRICE 31142 0 down 278 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months 0 down 252 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months CallTinyToday forPre-approval 1-800-661-0716 ail us to subscribe to our quarterly newsletter inquirykinglandford.com 0 down only 399 3.4 nanced bi-weekly for 60 mo one giving things away this December Check out these deals at Kingland in Hay River 500to use towards accesso or maintenence plans every 2013 purchase 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867-874-7716 E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.com www.kinglandsaleshr.com Donna Lee Jungkind RV Sales KINGLAND FORD SALES 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandfo Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Lorraine Pe Fleet Man Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales I3T643 Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager M Sa Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing DonneLeeJungkind Vehicle RV Sales LorrainePeterson Fleet Manager 2013 F150 SuperCab XLT 4x4 MSRP 40049 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2561 SALE PRICE 28238 I3T664 I3A08 2013 F150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 MSRP 43349 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2957 SALE PRICE 31142 0 down 278 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3T671 0 down 252 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months E-mail us to subscribe to our quarterly newsletter inquiry KINGLAND FORD SALES 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandf Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Lorraine P Fleet Ma Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales I3T643 Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager M Sa Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing DonneLeeJungkind Vehicle RV Sales LorrainePeterson Fleet Manager 2013 F150 SuperCab XLT 4x4 MSRP 40049 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2561 SALE PRICE 28238 I3T664 I3A08 2013 F150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 MSRP 43349 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2957 SALE PRICE 31142 0 down 278 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3T671 0 down 252 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months E-mail us to subscribe to our quarterly newsletter inquiry KINGLAND FORD SALES 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandf Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Lorraine Pe Fleet Ma Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales I3T643 Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager M Sa Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing DonneLeeJungkind Vehicle RV Sales LorrainePeterson Fleet Manager 2013 F150 SuperCab XLT 4x4 MSRP 40049 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2561 SALE PRICE 28238 I3T664 I3A08 2013 F150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 MSRP 43349 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2957 SALE PRICE 31142 0 down 278 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3T671 0 down 252 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months E-mail us to subscribe to our quarterly newsletter inquiry KINGLAND FORD SALES L 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867- E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.c Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Lorraine Peterson Fleet Manager Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales I3T643 Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Matt M Sales L Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing DonneLeeJungkind Vehicle RV Sales LorrainePeterson Fleet Manager 2013 F150 SuperCab XLT 4x4 MSRP 40049 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2561 SALE PRICE 28238 2 I3T664 20 I3A08 2013 F150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 MSRP 43349 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2957 SALE PRICE 31142 0 down 278 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3T671 0 down 252 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months E-mail us to subscribe to our quarterly newsletter inquirykin Santa one giving things away this December Check out these deals at Kingland in Hay River to use or ma ev 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867 E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.com www.king Lorraine Peterson Fleet Manager Tina Melvin Finance Manager CALL TINA TODAY FOR PRE-APPROVAL 1-800-661-0716 KINGLAND FORD SALES 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 8 E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandfor Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Lorraine Peter Fleet Manag Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales I3T643 Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Mat Sales Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing DonneLeeJungkind Vehicle RV Sales LorrainePeterson Fleet Manager 2013 F150 SuperCab XLT 4x4 MSRP 40049 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2561 SALE PRICE 28238 I3T664 2 I3A08 2013 F150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 MSRP 43349 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2957 SALE PRICE 31142 0 down 278 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3T671 0 down 252 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months E-mail us to subscribe to our quarterly newsletter inquiry KINGLAND FORD SALES 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 8 E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandfo Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Lorraine Pete Fleet Mana Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales I3T643 Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Ma Sale Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing DonneLeeJungkind Vehicle RV Sales LorrainePeterson Fleet Manager 2013 F150 SuperCab XLT 4x4 MSRP 40049 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2561 SALE PRICE 28238 I3T664 I3A08 2013 F150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 MSRP 43349 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2957 SALE PRICE 31142 0 down 278 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3T671 0 down 252 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months E-mail us to subscribe to our quarterly newsletter inquiry KINGLAND FORD SALES 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 8 E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandfor Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Lorraine Pete Fleet Manag Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales I3T643 Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Ma Sales Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing DonneLeeJungkind Vehicle RV Sales LorrainePeterson Fleet Manager 2013 F150 SuperCab XLT 4x4 MSRP 40049 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2561 SALE PRICE 28238 I3T664 2 I3A08 2013 F150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 MSRP 43349 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2957 SALE PRICE 31142 0 down 278 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3T671 0 down 252 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months E-mail us to subscribe to our quarterly newsletter inquiry KINGLAND FORD SALES LT 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867-8 E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.com Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Lorraine Peterson Fleet Manager Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales I3T643 Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Matt Mor Sales Lea Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing DonneLeeJungkind Vehicle RV Sales LorrainePeterson Fleet Manager 2013 F150 SuperCab XLT 4x4 MSRP 40049 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2561 SALE PRICE 28238 20 I3T664 2013 I3A08 2013 F150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 MSRP 43349 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 2957 SALE PRICE 31142 0 down 278 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3T671 0 down 252 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months E-mail us to subscribe to our quarterly newsletter inquiryking Santas not the only one giving things away this December Check out these deals at Kingland in Hay River to use or ma eve 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT Phone 867-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867-8 E-mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.com www.kingl NGLAND FORD SALES LTD 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT 7-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867-874-7716 mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.com Tina Duggan Finance Manager Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Lorraine Peterson Fleet Manager Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Matt Morse Sales Leasing ePeterson Manager Tina Melvin Finance Manager rCab XLT 4x4 40049 9250 2561 28238 MSRP 58899 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 4513 SALE PRICE 45136f 2013 F-150 SuperCrew Fx4 4x4 I3T664 MSRP 29049 Delivery Allowance 4250 Kingland Discount 1429 SALE PRICE 23370 2013 Focus TITANIUM 0 down 220 5.69 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3A08 REW XLT 4X4 43349 ce 9250 unt 2957 CE 31142 8 3.49 eekly for 60 months 3.49 ekly for 60 months CallTinyToday forPre-approval 1-800-661-0716 to our quarterly newsletter inquirykinglandford.com 0 down only 399 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months NGLAND FORD SALES LTD 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT 7-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867-874-7716 mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.com Tina Duggan Finance Manager Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Lorraine Peterson Fleet Manager Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Matt Morse Sales Leasing ePeterson Manager Tina Melvin Finance Manager rCab XLT 4x4 40049 9250 2561 28238 MSRP 58899 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 4513 SALE PRICE 45136f 2013 F-150 SuperCrew Fx4 4x4 I3T664 MSRP 29049 Delivery Allowance 4250 Kingland Discount 1429 SALE PRICE 23370 2013 Focus TITANIUM 0 down 220 5.69 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3A08 CREW XLT 4X4 43349 nce 9250 ount 2957 ICE 31142 78 3.49 weekly for 60 months 2 3.49 ekly for 60 months CallTinyToday forPre-approval 1-800-661-0716 to our quarterly newsletter inquirykinglandford.com 0 down only 399 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months NGLAND FORD SALES LTD 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT 7-874-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867-874-7716 mail saleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.com Tina Duggan Finance Manager Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Lorraine Peterson Fleet Manager Steve Moll Sales Manager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Matt Morse Sales Leasing ePeterson Manager Tina Melvin Finance Manager rCab XLT 4x4 40049 9250 2561 28238 MSRP 58899 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 4513 SALE PRICE 45136f 2013 F-150 SuperCrew Fx4 4x4 I3T664 MSRP 29049 Delivery Allowance 4250 Kingland Discount 1429 SALE PRICE 23370 2013 Focus TITANIUM 0 down 220 5.69 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3A08 REW XLT 4X4 43349 ce 9250 unt 2957 CE 31142 8 3.49 eekly for 60 months 3.49 ekly for 60 months CallTinyToday forPre-approval 1-800-661-0716 to our quarterly newsletter inquirykinglandford.com 0 down only 399 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months LAND FORD SALES LTD 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT 4-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867-874-7716 aleskinglandford.com www.kinglandford.com Tina Duggan Finance Manager Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Lorraine Peterson Fleet Manager Moll nager Donna Lee Jungkind Vehicle RV Sales Spencer King Dealer Principal Steve Moll Sales Manager Matt Morse Sales Leasing son er Tina Melvin Finance Manager b XLT 4x4 40049 9250 2561 28238 MSRP 58899 Delivery Allowance 9250 Kingland Discount 4513 SALE PRICE 45136f 2013 F-150 SuperCrew Fx4 4x4 I3T664 MSRP 29049 Delivery Allowance 4250 Kingland Discount 1429 SALE PRICE 23370 2013 Focus TITANIUM 0 down 220 5.69 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months I3A08 W XLT 4X4 43349 9250 2957 31142 3.49 or 60 months .49 r 60 months CallTinyToday forPre-approval 1-800-661-0716 ur quarterly newsletter inquirykinglandford.com 0 down only 399 3.49 nanced bi-weekly for 60 months ot the things away cember out these Kingland in River 500to use towards accessories or maintenence plans with every 2013 purchase. 922 Mackenzie Highway Hay River NT 4-7700 Toll Free 1-800-661-0716 Fax 867-874-7716 dford.com www.kinglandford.com www.kinglandsaleshr.com Dewey Roy Sales Leasing Donna Lee Jungkind RV Sales Tina Melvin Finance Manager Call Today For Pre-Approval 1-800-661-0716Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Dewey Roy Sales Leasing Lorraine Peterson Fleet Manager 2015 Ford F-150 XLT models shown 2016 Sport Model Shown 2016 SE Model Shown2015 Titanium Model Shown Donna Lee Jungkind RV Sales Tina Melvin Finance Manager Call Today For Pre-Approval 1-800-661-0716Kerry Setzer Sales Leasing Dewey Roy Sales Leasing Lorraine Peterson Fleet Manager 2015 Ford F-150 XLT models shown 2016 Sport Model Shown 2016 SE Model Shown2015 Titanium Model Shown