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Beaver workshop helps trappers bear the bad times Aworkshoponpreparingpelts held in Fort Smith last week aimed to arm trappers with traditional knowledge to help survive hard economic times. See page 7. MacPherson making mark at Mount Royal Fort Smiths Shaun MacPher- son was one of seven players recruited to the Mount Royal Huskiesthisseason.Hisspeed and mobility are already help- ing the teams blueline. See page 20. LIGHTS AND SIRENS Fort Smith reghters collected food and toys again Dec. 12. See page 13. Forget the Scorch Trials heres the Arctic Winter Games Athletes in sports from snow- shoe biathlon to futsel tried out for Team NWT in AWG trials in Hay River Yellow- knife and Fort Smith. See page 19. Before climate change was cool Dr. Ian Stirling was examin- ing the effects of the loss of sea ice on polar bears before climate change was even a term. Last week he was rec- ognized for it. See page 18. V IS IT W W W .N O R J.C A A national award winning independent newspaper serving northern Alberta and the Northwest Territories since 1977 1.00 December 16 2015 Vol. 39 No. 33 BY DALI CARMICHAEL There are many ways to handle losing an election but hopping aboard a plane to attend a large international forum on climate change is probably one of the less likely coping mechanisms. This was Herbert Nakimayaks plan. If he had not been elected as the new MLA of Nunakput his con- solation prize would have been a trip to Paris to watch the ongoing discussions at the COP21 forum. As the vice-president and head of International Affairs for the Cana- dian chapter of the Inuit Circumpo- lar Council Nakimayak felt it was important to have northern Indig- enous folks attending the talks. After all climate change already appears to have had an impact in the far north the Paulatuk resi- dents backyard. All the North all the whole cir- cumpolar village has been a ther- mostat for whats happening in this world Nakimayak said. Were no- ticing the rising temperatures and the unpredictable weather condi- tions with all the slumping and the shoreline erosion and the perma- frost degradation theres a lot going on and were starting to see it at an accelerated pace here. With the Paris Accord interna- tional climate change treaty now signed off by 195 countries the persistence of indigenous peoples Northerners join Paris invasion at COP21 to have their rights recognized in the new international document appears to have paid off - for now. Article 2.2 of the accord ad- dresses human rights and speci- cally indigenous rights as they re- lated to the climate change agree- ment though it was annexed and bracketed during the draft process nearly cut in other words for a time due to pushback from mostly Eu- ropean countries. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his Minister of Environment and Climate Change Catherine McKenna pushed for the inclu- sion of this statement as did in- digenous peoples and their allies as they rallied and protested on the streets of Paris. The nal agreement must rec- ognize adequately the importance of respecting human rights and the rights of indigenous peoples McKenna told a plenary session on Dec. 10 adding she was deeply concerned that the reference to human rights and rights of indig- enouspeopleswasbeingchallenged. Should human rights for Indig- enous Peoples be struck from the nal agreement negotiators will have destroyed any pretense of their intention to mitigate climate change Victoria Tauli-Corpuz the UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples said in a statement. Failure to protect Indigenous Peoples rights in a nal agreement will fuel destruction of the forests and other ecosystems managed since time immemorial by indigenous peoples. ErielDerangerarepresentativeof the Athabasca Chipewyan First Na- tionattheParistalksprovidedalmost daily updates from the talks online. Whydoweneedtohavetheinclu- sion of the rights of indigenous peo- plesinthisdocumentWellitspretty simple she said. Its absolutely im- perativethatweengageandfullyinte- gratetherightsofindigenouspeoples because many of these people have knowledge systems that are going to be critical for the development of ad- aptationandmitigationthatsgoingto betrulyeffectiveinachievingrealcli- matejusticeforeveryone.Itsnocoin- cidencethat80percentoftheworlds biodiversityisoccupiedbyindigenous people their knowledge systems are going to be critical - our knowledge systems are going to be critical - to actually getting to safe climate levels and the protection and preservation of Mother Earth. Ultimately the brackets were re- moved and the article was included in the nal agreement. OtherelementsoftheParisaccord that Canada has agreed to include A commitment to keeping the rise in global temperatures below two degrees with a 1.5-degree rise set as a goal. Beyond that scien- tists believe there could be serious consequences A pledge to cut emissions by 30 per cent from 2005 goals by 2030 Reportingandmonitoringofemis- sionswithmeetingseveryveyears to review progress Spending at least 100-billion a year along with other developed countriesbetween2020and2025 tohelpgrowingeconomiesoffsetthe effects of climate change. Develop a new Canadian climate strategybetweenthefederalgovern- ment and the provinces while also movingonaNorthAmericanplan. Its no coincidence that 80 per cent of the worlds biodiversity is occupied by indigenous people. Eriel Deranger ACFN Daniel Tseleie of Fort Providence at right his arms wide was one of several people from the Northwest Territories who attended the climate change talks in Paris last week. He took part in a rally outside the ofces of Paris oil giant Total on Dec. 8. PhotocourtesyofAllanLisner 2 Wednesday December 16 2015 JUSTICE MMIW NEWS BRIEFS Cancer group needs cash for new survivor care program With cancer as the leading cause of death in the NWT the NWTBreastHealthBreastCancerActionGrouphasaplan to address this need by launching the Survivor Care Plan Demonstration Project a program to empower and engage cancer survivors in their own health and wellness. The Ac- tion Groups challenge is nding enough funds to complete thistwo-yearsupportproject.Donationscanbemadein-per- sonbychequeoronthewebsiteathttpbreasthealthnwt. Fort Mac man rst in Alberta to be charged with sex tourism A Fort McMurray man is the rst Albertan to be charged withsextourismafterallegedlytravellingtoIrelandtohave sexwitha13-year-oldgirl.JashuaRobertTremblay33was chargedwithsextourismtwocountsofsexualinterference and luring after a lengthy and complex investigation. Po- lice accused Tremblay of travelling to Ireland twice in late 2013 to have sex with the girl who he met online and who was 13 at the time. This is the rst time the Alberta Law Enforcement Response Teams ALERT have laid charges under child sex tourism which was added to the Canadian Criminal Code in 1997. Charges in Hay River murder stayed Charges have been stayed against a woman arrested in connection with a homicide in Hay River earlier this year. Lori Roberta Hansen 41 was charged with second-degree murder after the remains of Roberta Lynn Sabourin 42 a mother of ve and a lifelong resident of Hay River were found in an apartment high-rise on April 8. On Dec. 8 the Public Prosecution Service of Canada directed that a stay of proceedings be entered in court according to the RCMP. No other information was provided. By CRAIG GILBERT Tina Fontaine 15 was found deceased and wrapped in plastic in the Red River on Aug. 17 2014. Winnipeg homicide inves- tigators arrested New Bruns- wick native Raymond Corm- ier in the Vancouver area on Dec. 9 2015. The charge of second-degree murder laid against him has not been proven in court. News of the discovery of Fontaines body reverberated nationwideandrenewedcalls foraninquiryintothe issue of missing and murdered indig- enous women. Fontaine was reportedmissingAug.92015 after she ran away from the hotel where she was staying as a ward of Child and Fam- ily Services. She had several encoun- ters with Cormier and both frequented the same eastside house the citys deputy chief of police Danny Smyth said Friday. He said the inves- tigation was long and com- plicated in part because it was difcult to track Fon- tainesmovementsinthedays leading up to her murder. It Recidivist from Maritimes charged with murder of Tina Fontaine involved forensic investiga- tion interviews and covert operations. The murder of this child and lets not forget she was a child has shocked and out- raged our community and I think that outrage has res- onated across our nation Smyth said. Investigators know Tina was highly vul- nerable and was exploited during her time on the run. Smyth said Cormier had an extensive criminal history including convictions for vi- olent offences and has been in and out of prison most of his adult life. Police believe he killed Fontaine on the last of several encounters with her. Smyth would not elab- orate on the nature of their relationship. They are not looking for any other suspects. Smyth said he hoped the announcement would bring some closure to Fontaines family. An outpouring of support began after the po- lice press conference. Win- nipeg Mayor Brian Bow- man thanked police and said he hoped the arrest would bring long-awaited peace in a tweet. Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimakanak MKO Grand Chief Sheila North Wilson said in a press release her heart goes out to Fontaines friends and family. I pray they feel a sense of relief despite the horrible tragedy theyre going through right now she said. For the community I imagine it brings all kinds of emotions once again but I hope they find some sense of peace knowing one more perpetra- tor is off our streets. Indigenous women still a target Terry Villeneuve who sits on the Native Womens Association of the NWT says indigenous women are more likely to be killed in the Northwest Territories. In the NWT there were up to 20 cases of missing and murdered women in the past 30 years and 17 of those were Aboriginal she said. That means 85 per cent were Aboriginal even though only 50 per cent of the population is made up of Aboriginal people. From 1980 to 2014 police services across Canada re- ported 6849 homicides in- volving female victims. For that same period Aborigi- nal female victims accounted for 16 per cent 1073 of all female victims of homicide. Since 1991 however the number of non-Aboriginal female homicide victims has been shrinking driving the proportion of Aboriginal fe- male homicide victims up from 14 per cent in that year to 21 per cent in 2014. In the NWT there were four homicides in 2014 up one from 2013 according to the RCMP there have been ve homicides so far in 2015 including that of May Elanik found outdoors in Aklavik Nov. 11. Acquaintance homicide was more common among non-Aboriginal female vic- tims than Aboriginal female victims 14 per cent versus 8 per cent while stranger ho- micide was similar between the two ve per cent versus four per cent. Please leave a message at 872-5543 for details. WESCLEAN NORTHERN SALES LTD. Ph 867 875-5100 Fax 867 875-5155 Avalon Cat Hair - long Size - medium Gender - female Avalon is a very loving and beautiful cat. She is spayed and is up-to-date with all her shots.If you think you have a home for a Avalon please call the shelter at 872-5543. Please leave a message at 872-5543 for details. WESCLEAN NORTHERN SALES LTD. Ph 867 875-5100 Fax 867 875-5155 E-mail infowescleannwt.com web www.wescleannwt.com Avalon Cat Hair - long Size - medium Gender - female Avalon is a very loving and beautiful cat. She is spayed and is up-to-date with all her shots.If you think you have a home for a Avalon please call the shelter at 872-5543. Please leave a message at 872-5543 for details. WESCLEAN NORTHERN SALES LTD. Ph 867 875-5100 Fax 867 875-5155 E-mail infowescleannwt.com web www.wescleannwt.com Avalon Cat Hair - long Size - medium Gender - female Avalon is a very loving and beautiful cat. She is spayed and is up-to-date with all her shots.If you think you have a home for a Avalon please call the shelter at 872-5543. SpayedNeutered Up-to-datewithroutineshots House trained SethFemaleYoung cat Black domestic longhair mix Looking for a new home Look at this little puffball Shes just the sweetest little baby kitty cat. She wants you to love her. Please take her home and give her love. Notice to our Wonderful Readers Next week the edition of December 23 will be the last of 2015 for the Northern Journal. We will not publish during the two holiday weeks and start the New Year on Wednesday January 13 2016. That edition will be our annual Year in Review special section where we recap all the events and activity highlights of 2015. The holidays are almost here Thank you and your helpers on behalf of all the happy Fort Smith kids who attended your special Christmas party this year. Youre the best PS. And thanks to Santa as well Wednesday December 16 2015 3 December 21 December 22 December 23 December 24 December 25 December 28 December 29 December 30 December 31 January 1 OPEN OPEN OPEN OPEN CLOSED CLOSED OPEN OPEN OPEN CLOSED ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ............ EMERGENCY SERVICES EMERGENCY SERVICES remain available 24 hours a day. Have a Safe and Healthy Christmas Fort Smith Health and Social Services Authority Medical Clinic and Lab X-Ray Holiday Hours INDUSTRY MINING Snap Lake employment by location full-time equivalent positions according to company person-years worked data 2014 BEHCHOK DELINE ENTERPRISE FORT GOOD HOPE FORT PROVIDENCE FORT RESOLUTION FORT SMITH GAMTI 13.5 4.8 0.3 1.0 4.2 1.7 8.1 2.6 HAY RIVER INUVIK LUTSEL KE TULITA WEKWETI WHATI YELLOWKNIFE OTHER 32.8 0.5 0.8 1.3 2.7 3.4 181.3 489.4 By CRAIG GILBERT TheimpactofthelossoftheSnapLakemine will land eventually but it is clear skies for now at least for Northwestern Air Lease NWAL. When De Beers Canada announced on Dec. 4 it would stop regular operations at the diamond mine 220 kilometres north of Yellowknife NWAL general and operations manager Brian Harrold gured the compa- nys bi-weekly runs from Fort Smith and Hay River every other Wednesday would cease. UsuallytheightbringsoneortwofromFort Smith and picks up seven or eight more some- times 10 in Hay River and brings back eight to 11onreturn.Thecompanyusedtobringasmany as14backbutthatspareddownashasanextra Tuesday night run to the mine on the opposite weekwhichwentonlythreetimesbeforeitwas cancelledinthewakeofthemineannouncement. OnDec.7thoughhefoundoutthatistheonly businessNWALstandstoloseinthenearfuture. WethoughtweweregoingtolosealltheSnap stuff but I just got the email Monday that were still doing the same thing Harrold said speculatingthatsomeoftheHayRiverandFort Smithemployeesmayhavespecializedskillsstill needed at the mine. He noted one of the Smith employees is a cook. Were not seeing any im- pactatall.Whoknowswhathappensdownthe road but Im still fairly positive. Anglo American PLC which owns 85 per centofDeBeersitis15-per-centownedbythe government of Botswana revealed last week the Snap Lake closure is but part of a wider ef- fort to cut costs at the company as it has plans to reduce its workforce by 63 per cent or about 85000 employees worldwide. ThecompanywhichalsooperatestheVictor diamondmineinOntariocontinuestobuildthe GahchoKuemineintheNorthwestTerritories with 49 per cent partner Mountain Province DiamondsInc.GahchoKueisexpectedtostart productioninlate2016andoperatefor11years. Snap Lake spent 182 million in the North in 2014 and 2.2 billion in total since 2005 including 863 million with Aboriginal com- panies. It has created nearly 7000 person- years of employment with 2309 of them worked by Northerners. NWT businesses provide critical goods and services to Snap Lake including personnel for siteservicessupporttransportoffuelandsup- pliesonthewinterroadlogisticsandpassenger ights catering environmental monitoring explosives pipe valves and ttings screening for underground ground support shotcrete and other supplies according to the company. Diamond mines created more than 574 million of GDP in 2014 spending more than 20 million in property taxes and more than 5 million in fuel taxes. Suspension work at Snap Lake which em- ployednearly750peopleduringproductionwill requireapproximately120employees.Oncethat phase is completed the care and maintenance phasewillrequireapproximately70employees. Forty-one employees have been transferred to De Beers Gahcho Ku Project with the poten- tial for another 60 to transfer at some point in 2016.Atotalof434employeeshavebeenlaidoff from Snap Lake with 16 weeks notice. The companys CEO has said it would try to keepasmanyNorthernersonaspossible.Most NWT residents who work at the mine live in Yellowknife see chart below. The next larg- est groups are in the Tlicho region and Hay River with about 30 workers each. We understand its around 20 to 30 jobs Hay River Mayor Brad Mapes said. Some of our people that were affected have their posi- tions moved over to the new Gahcho Ku De Beers property but it is a concern to the town. Itsnotjusttheirjobsitskindofarippleeffect. Elected in October the former town coun- cillor and still-entrepreneur was concerned about the towns economy before the Snap Lake announcement. I think Snap Lake was always something theyweregoingtolookatinthefutureMapes said. The future was bleak for them for a few years. Its just hard to swallow - I dont think anybody expected it to happen that quickly. Theeconomyiskindofbadenoughinourcom- munity so its kind of affected us that way. Mapes like Harrold is staying positive. Theres really nothing that we could do he said. We cant go back to De Beers and say Give us those jobs back. Its done right No one expects anybody to run something that doesnt make any money. We also have to understand this is something that was going to come down. Every mine has a shelf life to it. We were on borrowed time with that Snap Lake project already so in some ways we should probably be happy with the time frame we did have. Snap Lake impact slow to emerge across North Northwestern Air Lease NWAL has been told to continue regular ights to the Snap Lake mine north of Yellowknife until further notice. Filephoto 4 Wednesday December 16 2015 The Northern Journal is an independent newspaper covering news and events in the western Arctic and northern Alberta. The Northern Journal is published weekly by Cascade Publishing Ltd. Printed at Star Press Inc. Wainwright AB. Publisher................................................................................. Don Jaque 867-872-3000 ext.21 donnorj.ca Editor..................................................................................... Craig Gilbert 867-872-3000 ext.24 newsnorj.ca Reporter....................................................................... Dali Carmichael 867-872-3000 ext.25 reporternorj.ca Comptroller .......................................................Jessica Dell 867-872-3000 ext.20 webnorj.ca Advertising........................................................................... 867-872-3000 ext. 26 adsnorj.ca Administration............................................Jeremy Turcotte 867-872-3000 ext.26 adminnorj.ca Production Manager ......................................Sandra Jaque 867-872-3000 ext.22 sandranorj.ca Graphics........................................................Paul Bannister 867-872-3000 ext.27 graphicsnorj.ca Letters to the Editor Policy The Northern Journal welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and include a phone number so the author can be veried. Names will be withheld on request in special circumstances where the reasons are determined to be valid. The Journal reserves the right to edit letters for length libel clarity and taste. Opinions expressed in letters and columns are not necessarily those of the publisher or editor. EDITORIAL LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 2013 CCNA BLUE RIBBON CANADIAN COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER AWARD 2013 C M C A AUDITED Advertising Deadlines Display ad deadline is Thursday at 400 p.m. Classied ad deadline is Thursday at 500 p.m. Email adsnorj.ca Subscription Rates Prices include GST. 47.25 in Fort Smith 52.50 elsewhere in Canada 105 in the USA overseas 164.30. The Northern Journal acknowledges the nancial support of the Government of Canada through the Canada Periodical Fund CPF for our publishing activities. Seven words to inspire a nation Racism and sexism in this country kills. Seven words to inspire a nation uttered not seven weeks after Canadian voters gave Prime Minister Justin Trudeaus Liberals the politi- cal capital to change how the country interacts with itself and the rest of the world. The quote the perfect sequel to Trudeaus because its 2015 was voiced by Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Carolyn Bennett at once a conversation-stopper and an action-starter. That statement made as the Liberal gov- ernment gets a national missing and mur- dered indigenous women MMIW inquiry underway juxtaposed against former prime minister Stephen Harpers now-infamous line dismissing the MMIW phenomenon as not registering on the Conservatives radar is surreal. After almost 10 years of a govern- ment with its head in the sand the pace of change seems almost breakneck. Theinquirywillbewelcomednowheremore than in Northern Canada. Statistics Canada recently reported some of the highest rates of violentcrimeinCanadaarefoundintheNorth- west Territories. A cursory review of the NWT territorial criminal docket one day last week revealed 181 charges under Section 266 of the Criminal Code which deals with assault. A MMIW inquiry is one of the ve points in Trudeaus plan to renew relations with First Nation Mtis and Inuit groups which he revealed the same day at a special meet- ing of the regional chiefs of the Assembly of First Nations. Repealing legislation that was unilaterally imposed the inference being by the Conservatives is another. Where measures are found to be in con- ict with your rights where they are inconsis- tent with the principles of good governance or wheretheysimplymakenopublicpolicysense wewillrescindthemTrudeausaidtoapplause. Clapping when there is a blank cheque at the front of the room is easy but the challenge before the Liberals on this front is the same that will dog them as they roll out a social pol- icy agenda nine years or more in the making moneytalks.Theearlyconsultativephaseofthe MMIWinquiryhasalreadybegunwithplansto launchproceedingsinearnestinthespring.In budgeting40millionovertwoyearstheLib- erals have bet on the price tag landing some- where between the Ipperwash inquiry which cost 13.3 million in 2003 and the 1996 Royal CommissiononAboriginalPeopleswhichcost 60million.Bennetthasalludedtotheinquiry possibly lasting longer and costing more. The last three points of Trudeaus plan will not be any easier to pay for. The rst making signicantinvestmentsinFirstNationsedu- cation would cost billions before 2019 if Lib- eral campaign gures hold up. Trudeau said in Saskatoon on Aug. 13 his plan included pour- ing 515 million into base annual funding for First Nations K-12 education plus 50 million more for the Post-Secondary Student Support Program for indigenous college and university students. He pledged another 500 million overthreeyearsforeducationalinfrastructure. The third point in Trudeaus plan is likewise worthyofapplausebutmayalsoleadtosticker- shock lifting the two per cent cap on annual increases to payments to First Nations from the federal government is long overdue. The freeze was enacted in 1996 but the First Na- tions population has grown by more than six per cent yearly since and ination has reduced thebuyingpowerofthosedollarsevenfurther. Tackling that gap which manifests most visibly in the decrepit housing stock many indigenous communities cannot afford to maintain let alone replace will be a signi- cant undertaking. So too will be Trudeaus fth point an ambitious plan to implement all 94 recommendations from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission TRC. Someofthecostsofthoserecommendations would be fairly straightforward for example the construction of a highly visible monument in each provincial and territorial capital. Oth- erssuchascreatingmandatorycurriculumon residentialschoolsforK-12reducingthenum- berofAboriginalchildreningovernmentcare improvinghealthcareoutcomesforAboriginal peopleandincreasingfundingtotheCanadian BroadcastingCorporationtobetterenableitto supportreconciliationmaybehardertosussout. Well into 2016 once the cost implications of all these noble plans come more into focus it will likely be time for sober second thoughts. What of all the wonderful things promised by the federal Liberals can Canada afford Ex- pectations will be high. It will be tough but necessary then to set priorities do what has to be done but at the same time the spending to include only what is affordable. InthemeantimeTrudeauandcompanyare ontherighttrackmakingaMMIWinquirytheir rst order of business one important enough to all Canadians to be a priority for funding eveninadecitenvironment.Thetimeisnow. It will not be 2015 for much longer. A cursory review of the NWT territorial criminal docket one day last week revealed 181 charges under Section 266 of the Criminal Code which deals with assault. Are Albertans aficted with climate change Stockholm Syndrome Editor Its clear the Alberta government asked itself the wrong question and then not sur- prisingly failed to reach the right answer. Is the task of a climate plan to ensure the oil and gas industry can do business pretty much as usual in the face of climate change Or is it to take steps to reduce carbon emis- sions from our province and do our part to avoid global climate change induced chaos If climate change is the challenge it seems undeniably to be our task must be the latter and if so the Alberta governments plan fails. The provincial government has come up with a plan that astonishingly doesnt reduce Albertas emissions from todays ex- tremely high levels. Indeed even though coal is going to be eliminated as a fuel for generating electricity by 2030 because oil sands emissions are going to be allowed to grow by 43 per cent Albertas overall GHG emissions will keep growing until they sta- bilize in 2030 at a level higher than todays. Thats right under the governments plan Albertas emissions keep growing. The challenge for Albertans is to change the way we think the greatest hurdle we face in addressing the need to reduce our carbon emissions is not economic but psychological. It looks as if many of us are suffering from something like Stockholm Syndrome where hostages become so insecure and fearful they come to identify with their captors interests. Many Albertans seem to believe we can- not break free of the forces that threaten our well-being and limit our economy. But we could break free if public policy did not cater to the oil and gas industry in inappro- priate ways. If the government had adopted the carbon price recommended to it by the Pembina In- stitute Albertans could have been proud of the resulting plan. The Institute wanted to see a carbon price starting at 40 per tonne of CO2 emitted in 2016 with a schedule for increasing it by 10 per tonne annually over the rst 10 years of the policy. This is gener- ally the level of stringency necessary for Al- berta to make a fair contribution to Canadas international commitments. As it is the governments plan is another in a continuing series of embarrassments on the fossil fuel industry and carbon emis- sions front. Janet Keeping Leader Green Party of Alberta Bunnik a six-month-old fawn belonging to Inuviks reindeer herders made her debut at the communitys Christmas parade held Dec. 13. PhotoTownofInuvikFacebookpage Wednesday December 16 2015 5 COLUMNS 15 Years Ago... Smith-Chip winter road open The winter road between Fort Smith and Fort Chipewyan opened Friday. According to Lindsay Wasy- lyshyn the technical services manager with Wood Buf- falo National Park the opening had not been expected so soon because of unusual conditions on the Peace River crossing at Moose Island. Issue December 19 2000 20 Years Ago... CRTC approves NWTels cable TV application The Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunica- tions Commission approved Northwestels application to provide cable television service in the Northwest Ter- ritories and Yukon December 15. With this approval Northwestel is planning to go ahead and purchase three existing cable systems in the North. Issue December 19 1995 30 Years Ago... Albertans buy Buffalo Airways An Alberta father and son team are the new owners of the Fort Smith operations of Buffalo Airways Ltd. Terry Harrold and son Brian of Lamont Alta. bought the com- pany on Nov. 25 from receivers Peat Marwick of Edmon- ton. The sale will mean a change of name since a part of Buffalo Airways is still operating in Hay River under the original name. The Harrolds company is currently known as Northwestern Air Lease Ltd. Issue December 19 1985 ARCHIVES Northern Journal 2015 Join us online Like Northern Journal on Facebook and get the weekly news delivered to your feed FACEBOOK FEEDBACK A decade later the Mikisew Cree First Nation v. Canada landmark decision still resonates in Canadian courtrooms. Ten years on Mikisew Cree First Nation v. Canada still a landmark Ron Gwynne Daryl C. English Jackie Hookimaw and Sandra Wilson like this. De Beers halts mining at Snap Lake 21 people shared this. By DAWN KOSTELNIK A group of spectators has formed around her. Ev- eryone wants to watch her dance and sing her story. She swoops with the drum her song rises in a chant. Faster and faster she goes. Eyes are widening in amazement. No one has ever seen the dance that she is doing. All of a sud- den she drops the drum. Her tiny bent body begins to gy- rate in a dance that is caus- ing even more wonderment. What is she doing Her full fur trimmed Itigi swings and sways around her hips Her head comes up and a big smile reveals that she needs some teeth. Grinning from ear to ear she twists to White Girl The Night Before Christmas Elvis playing a song in her mind. We all laugh. Some lit- tle kids copy her and fall on the oor in glee. It is Christ- mas after all. Our home- grown version of Credence Clearwater Revival starts to warm up guitar strings at the front of the hall. It only takes a minute and the dance oor is full. Parkas are pulled over heads and thrown in a pile. Wideeyedbabiesarepulled from their mothers backs and set in the pile of clothing that is growing. Everyone watches for the babies. One of them could get lost in the mountain of cloth and fur. Kids dance with grandmas. There are no particular partners every- one just dances Chairs are pushed back against the wall as the dance oor lls. This dance will go until the Cop- permine CCR needs a break then award winning ddler Colin Adjun will cause feet to ash as no one can resist a jig or three. Coppermine Credence will come back once theyve had their ll of jigging and Annie may pick up her drum again. Christmas morning in- volves church. Catholics are a minority in Coppermine most people are of Anglican or Pentecostalfaith.Iamglad to see that Mrs.Priest haslots of families in her church here. There werent many that went to visit her and Mr. Priest in Fort Norman. It was mainly Catholic there. My family attends Mass with the Nip- tanatiaks the Gaus and the Elgoks.Afterchurchthe visit- ing starts. Everyone comes to our house for tea and cookies and cake. My mom spends a lot of time baking. All day long people stop in to say hello and wish us a MerryChristmas.Weplaylots of cards here we got a brand new game called Monopoly for Christmas. The Anglicans seem to think its okay to play cards. It is great to learn all of the new games Double soli- taire is my favourite. I wish I could remember how to play that game it uses two decks of cards. We played cards on the Mackenzie River too but we didnt talk about it much. I get to pack the babies around so their moms can relax there are a lot of ba- bies. The babies ride on your back under your Itigi a belt or rope is tied under their bums and around your waist so they dont fall out. Some- times they pee on you. It is so much fun to have every- one visiting shaking hands. Some of the older people still rub noses. There are not many presents lots of food and dancing smiling people. How nice. I love Christmas www.thewhitegirl.ca Going to ground Time to sequester the legacy load By KIM RAPATI How did we do with our goal of bringing the message ofhopethatsoilhasforglobal climate change to leaders at the Paris conference A historic event has oc- curred for the first time world leaders at the UN Con- ference of the Parties on cli- mate change COP21 have made the capture of carbon in the soil a formal part of the global response to cli- mate change Our growing number of healthy soil advocates is starting to break through in teaching others that one of the best opportunities for drawing carbon back to the Earth is for farmers and land managers to sequester more carbon in the soil. Reducing emissions is an essential part of the equation but that will not change the legacy load of carbon in the atmosphere already. The time is now to talk about sequestering car- bon. The technology is there plants use photosynthesis to draw carbon from the air and deposit in the soil and the management practices to maximize soils potential to capture this energy are also readily available using regen- erative agriculture and holis- tic planned grazing. As conventional industrial agriculture and food produc- tion has intensied it is esti- mated that between 50 and 80 per cent of soil carbon has been lost around the world. We know with regenerative agriculture which mimics nature to ensure ecosystem processes function properly we can reverse high levels of CO2 in the air. Just at the end of November our Savory Hub in Turkey Anadolu Meralari posted that they received their results for their Ho- listic Management learning site this year they increased the soil organic matter in the rst 30 centimetres by 0.62 per cent. This is a huge ac- complishment for their small project of 20 hectares with a three-person team they have sequestered 2000 tons of C02 in one year or their personal carbon emission for the next 110 years while producing the best quality meat and cheese in the area. We felt the exhilaration of being connected to a global group of revolutionary farm- ers when we hosted our Soil for Climate event in Fort Simpson and in Hay River while our friends hosted similar events in Paris South Africa Malawi the British Isles Australia Mexico and the United States. The most exciting news to come out of COP21 is that the French government has launched the 4 Per 1000 Initiative Soils for Food Se- curity and Climate which aims to protect and increase carbon stocks in soils. A 0.4 per cent annual growth rate in soil carbon content would make it possible to stop the present increase in atmo- spheric CO2 and achieve the long-term goal of limiting the average global tempera- ture increase to the 1.5 2C threshold which is necessary. Twenty-ve countries and 75 researchersandNGOssigned on at the launch of the 4 Per 1000Initiative.Youcanread more at the Regeneration In- ternational website. One of NFTIs long-term goals is to build a carbon- negative campus. We will be working actively to track the carbon we emit and what we sequester so we can be a part of this exciting global mo- mentum to heal our planet Kim Rapati is the opera- tions manager at the North- ern Farm Training Institute in Hay River. 6 Wednesday December 16 2015 ENVIRONMENT WILDLIFE Buffalo Express AIR Toll-free 1 800 465-3168 salesbuffaloairexpress.com www.buffaloairexpress.com Yellowknife - 867 765-6002 Hay River - 867 874-3307 Edmonton - 780 455-9283 WE SERVICE ALL POINTS IN THE NWT that are accessible by commercial aircraft. Ask about our TRUCK AIR EXPRESS RATESTruck Air Express trucks from Edmonton and Calgary and flies out of Yellowknife. WESCLEAN NORTHERN SALES WESCLEAN NORTHERN SALES is the NWTs first choice for Janitorial and Industrial Supplies Flooring Paint and Wallcoverings Premium Wood Pellet Sales and Door to Door Truck Courier Service WESCLEAN 15 Industrial Drive Hay River NT Tel 875-5100 Fax 875-5115 www.wescleannwt.com Flooring Area Rugs Paint Window Coverings Janitorial Supplies W ESCLEA N N.W.T. HURRY IN Sale ends Nov. 27 Flooring Area Rugs Paint Window Coverings Janitorial Supplies interior design headquarters By CRAIG GILBERT Surrounded by local elders Ontario farm boy hunter-trapper-angler and biologist Phillippe Thomas stands in a party tent in a remote Northern community and turns an- other muskrat inside out. They could be gathered in any one of 10 villages or hamlets in the oilsands region of Alberta or upwards of 30 Northwest Territo- ries communities he has brought his work to in the past three years measuring contami- nant levels in furbearing animals. Organizations Thomas is associated with include Environment Canadas Joint Oil Sands Monitoring Program and the Stra- tegic Partnership Initiative SPI the Slave Watershed Environmental Effects Program SWEEP run out of Dr. Paul Jones shop at the University of Saskatchewan and the Peace Athabasca Ecological Monitoring Program to name a few. The only member of a family who left the dairy farm to pursue another career Thomas is aware that he knows not nearly enough to waltz into the Slave River watershed and do good science without help from the people who for generations have been harvesting the animals he is interested in. I just cant stress enough the importance of including traditional knowledge in some of the science we do he said. As scientists we dont know everything. This is where working with a lot of the elders and putting yourself in their shoes and living their life has value. Traditional knowledge is a database of infor- mation allowing us to determine how nor- mal is normal What constitutes a change Thomas said he stays with families not in motels and eats traditional foods when he is in the eld. He returned to his Ottawa base from his most recent trip North about three weeks ago and plans to be back in February. HecreditstheUniversityofNorthernBritish Columbia where he earned his graduate de- gree for his inclusive worldview. He said First Nations have strong inuence on the curricu- lum there which requires students to take a qualitativesciencecoursethattrainsthemhow to talk about their research in plain language. Being inclusive I think makes for stronger science and more relevance trying to answer questions people care about Thomas said. Its fun to write papers and get published but I think its really important and to me its the most rewarding part just being able to address some concerns that communities have on the wellbeing of the wildlife or the water that they drink. I think we cant do that alone. We need to do it with the communi- ties involved and committed. The research involves strong collaborations with the Alberta Trappers Association and various trappers throughout the province of Alberta and the Northwest Territories. The work was mostly through the Peace Athabasca Ecological Monitoring program out of Fort Chipewyan with the Dene and Cree nations. In his rst three years on the ground Thomas recruited resident trappers and hunters train- ing them to perform dissections and handle samples. Then he essentially hired them to do the groundwork sourcing animals from their regular harvesting activities. Collect- ing thousands of samples alone would not have been feasible. Front and centre theyve been my closest collaborators and Ive been extremely lucky to partner with these guys. He also involved elders and young people in the science and said the benets go both ways. Even doing dissections and looking at simple things like the colour of the liver and having some elders with you working along- side - who better to know than an elder who has been eating and trapping muskrats for 40-50 years as opposed to a scientist who has been working with the animal for ve Talking with these guys getting to know a little bit about where to look and what to look for and what species to work with just by doing this consultation and getting them involved and answering some of my questions Ive generated a lot of interest with the communities. They start wanting to be involved. He ts right in Bruce Maclean community-based moni- toring research coordinator for the Mikisew Cree and Athabasca Chipewyan First Na- tions said seeing a federal scientist with a collaborative approach is a breath of fresh air in Fort Chipewyan. Hesfuntoworkwithbecausehechallenges the status quo within government and cer- tainly under Harper that was a rare breed Maclean said. He kind of sacriced personal job stability to actually succeed in making those connections with the First Nations. Maclean praised Thomas ability to cut through red tape and bring research fund- ing into Aboriginal communities. Its a very collaborative process and to me that stands out. His relationship-build- ing piece is generous Maclean continued. Hes in the community hes meeting with elders going out on the land talking to stu- dents. Hes put in the time to create the trust and hes also bringing capacity and employ- ment to us. Its a nice partnership. Im a sci- entist and sometimes its our nature to be a little more reserved. We prefer data sets to people. Phil is a people person and hed love nothing more than to sit around in a bush camp shooting the breeze with the elders so he ts right in. Thomas said spending that time with young people is his favourite part of the job. Im trying to encourage the youth to stay in school and encouraging them to also visit the labs here and getting them really involved in a hands-on approach he said. I work with youth from eight years-old through to late teens. Its funny you learn a lot from youth too just talking to them. Inconversationsoverpizzathatoftenstretch into the night Thomas said he quizzes the teens and is always surprised to hear how few of them have been out on the land. Im a hunter and I trap. If I were out there I would always be out on the land he said. A lot of these young guys they really dont so it gives them an appreciation and sort of en- courages them to reconnect with these roots talk to an elder follow some mentors out on the land and reconnect to where we all came from I guess. Its a great part of the job. Within acceptable guidelines There is very little baseline data in the NWT on toxins in the animals Thomas is studying including lynx otters muskrat and beaver and virtually none in Alberta. He also has moose bison and deer samples in the freezer more than 8500 samples from 1700 animals in all. Thomas has the liver and muscles screened for contaminants including heavy metals and hydrocarbons as he describes them contaminants that are not only generated by the oilsands in- dustry but also by forest fires the mining industry and so on. The rst lab results have begun to roll in. In the oilsands you nd for sure a con- taminant signature in some of the mam- mals Thomas explained. Mammals asso- ciated with water semi-aquatic mink otters more so than others. Id say levels are not above tissue residue guidelines so to speak when you can nd them. He said mercury levels are comparable to for example a mink found near the Great Lakes. There have been a lot of studies on mink and the mink Ive collected in the oilsands are equal if not slightly less contaminated than Ontario mink he said. I think that just speaks to the higher population there but without a baseline its hard to say. By definition there is no sunset on Thomas work. This is where Im saying Im committed for the long-run. Whats really important is not so much the tissue residue levels but seeing if those levels are going up or down. Then you can provide mitigation strategies. Federal scientist sources traditional knowledge PhotocourtesyofPhillipeThomas Fort Mackay youth participating in a dissection workshop organized by Environment Canada Fort Mackay Sustainability Dept. and the Fort Mackay Youth Centre. Wednesday December 16 2015 7 MOONLIGHT MADNESSMADNESS Open Late for Moonlight Madness Enjoy exceptional holiday savings and extended shopping hours. This is our BIGGESTsale of the year Northern Store Fort Smith NT 867-872-2568 Friday December 18 from 900 a.m. - 1000 p.m. wishes you a Merry Christmas THE NORTHWEST TERRITORY MTIS NATION Northwest Territory Mtis Nation NWTMN offices will be closed December 18 to January 3rd. The offices will re-open on January 4th at 9 a.m. ENVIRONMENT COUNTRY FOOD By DALI CARMICHAEL A five-year project twinning traditional knowledge and Western science has found berries growing near the oilsands industrial sites in northern Alberta have at the very least lower nutritional value than berries found in more remote locations. Since the fall of 2010 elders from Fort McKay First Nation have been using one of their most dependable resources - their tra- ditional knowledge - to monitor the impacts of regional oilsands on cranberries and blue- berries in the area a study in conjunction with the Wood Buffalo Environmental Asso- ciations WBEA Terrestrial Environmental Effects Monitoring TEEM program. The value of having the community monitor the health of berry patches is that theyve spent their whole lives going to the patches said Janelle Baker an an- thropologist and PhD Candidate at McGill University who has been involved with the project from the beginning. They have a lifetime of already existing observations and knowing how the patches should be. Id like to know if theres any differ- ence in the berries now than when I grew up said Barb Faichney a participant in the study for a number of years. When I grew up you could walk down the road in the bush and just pick berries off and eat them. Id like to know if its still like that. Elders from the community have reported that even if they could find berries near their homes they would no longer trust them enough to pick and eat them. They partnered with the WBEA an in- dependent non-profit organization moni- toring air in the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo to test their findings against Western science. Funding for the project came from the Alberta Environmental Monitoring Evaluation and Reporting Agency AMERA. After a year of participating in visual monitoring WBEA established five pas- sive air pollution monitoring stations test- ing for sulphur dioxide nitrogen dioxide and volatile organic compounds at select berry patches set at varying distances away from the oilsands industrial activity. Farthest from the community and areas of industrial development was a berry patch at Moose Lake. Results determined the patches closer to industrial development had higher average monthly airborne pollution concentrations than the Moose Lake patch. Moose Lake blueberries in contrast were found to have the highest measure of phenolics a naturally-occurring chemi- cal known to have antioxidant properties. They also had higher levels of chlorogenic acid - said to help lower blood pressure - and the highest level of proanthocyani- dins which are linked to reducing the risk of coronary heart disease. A release from the WBEA noted that from a Western science perspective industrial pollutant concentrations found in the ber- ries were not high enough to cause direct injury to the plants. Results on the collaborative study and more information on the processes can be found in a video produced by the WBEA Using Traditional Knowledge and Western Science to Monitor Berry Patches in the Athabasca Oil Sands Re- gion. Watch at httpswww.youtube.com watchvVGa6R7jRpnE. Lower nutritional value in oilsands berries study PhotocourtesyofWikipedia-CreativeCommons Since the fall of 2010 elders from Fort McKay First Nation have been monitoring the impacts of regional oilsands on cranberries and blueberries in the area. 8 Wednesday December 16 2015 INDUSTRY WIND POWER We believe that being a good neighbour is all about showing respect. So no matter where we live and work you can expect respect in everything we do. Cenovus Energy. A Canadian oil company. New ideas. New approaches.cenovus.com Having your respect is something we work at every day. By DALI CARMICHAEL As Santa makes his descent from the North Pole this year he might notice a new red light hanging high in the sky just outside of Inuvik - and it isnt Ru- dolphs nose. Earlier this month a new 60-metre wind tower was installed near High Point hill 13 kilometres outside of the community to mea- sure wind power in the area and to test the feasibility of a wind farm. The tower is only the latest in a series of similar wind power experiments in the Beau- fort Delta conducted by Yukon engineer J.P. Pinard through the Arctic Research Insti- tute over the last several years. The project is funded by the Government of the North- west Territories. We did put a station and some moni- toring sensors on another tower up at Storm Hills and we found phenomenal winds there world-class winds. The issue there is to build a road and a powerline there and thats going to make it very ex- pensive Pinard said noting the site was about 60 km out of town. The folks at the Northwest Territories Power Corp. approached me at one time saying what about this hill thats just 13 km east of Inuvik And I said sure let me look at it a little more closely. Earlier this year a 30-metre tower was in- stalled at the same site but had to be taken down after only eight months. A data logger has already started sending out weekly updates from the tower which features both heated and unheated sen- sors - Pinard worried cold temperatures and ice build-up may have impacted the accuracy of past measurements if only by a few increments. A road away from fossil fuels Testing will likely continue for at least one year if not two or three before any moves are made to get wind turbines installed. However should the test results come out as Pinard expects them to it could mean large savings for the town of Inuvik which currently runs on natural gas with diesel generators as a fallback. We did the economics we converted those wind speeds into turbine energy production based on a particular model and then costed it out and what we found was it turns out that if we put a wind farm on High Point it would be about the same price as putting a wind farm at Storm Hills he said. We would be better off at having it at High Point because wed be able to build a road there and it would be very quick to access the site if there were problems. Pinard isnt the only one optimistic about the promise of wind power. Inuvik mayor Jim MacDonald said he was also eager to see the outcome of the testing. They are seriously looking at wind and I think its a good option for power for the community MacDonald said of NTPC. If they get some really good results in Im sure theyll start moving further into the planning and getting things off the ground. Well see hopefully. Pinard said the fossil fuel industry receives heavy subsidies from development to produc- tion giving it an unfair advantage. If we can show there is cheaper energy coming from that site than from natural gas then great Pinard said. Even if it was a little more expensive than natural gas electricity theres still a case for it. When you look at the big picture theres been way too many sub- sidies toward fossil fuel and there hasnt been a real level playing field for renewable energy. There should be an incentive to make wind a little bit cheaper. I think the opportunity for Inuvik is that you could be using wind energy not to just displace fossil fuel for electricity generation but also for space heating. Earlier this month a new 60-metre wind tower was installed near High Point hill 13 kilometres outside Inuvik to measure wind power in the area. Inuvik testing for wind power feasibility PhotoJ.P.Pinard Insurance Specialist 62 Woodland Dr. 105 Hay River NT X0E 1G1 867 874-2101 Insurance Specialist 62 Woodland Dr. 105 Hay River NT X0E 1G1 867 874-2101 Norland Insurance would like to celebrate with you over this holiday season. MERRY CHRISTMAS MERRY CHRISTMAS Have a wonderful Christmas and a Festive Season Have a wonderful Christmas and a Festive Season Smiths Landing First Nation P.O. Box 1470 Fort Smith X0E 0P0 867-872-4950 10 Wednesday December 16 2015 TOWN OF INUVIK Northwest Territories MAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAYMAY 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MTIS LOCAL 125 FORT CHIPEWYAN ALBERTA SeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasonsSeasons 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Yearand a New Yearand a New Yearand a New Yearand a New Yearand a New Yearand a New Yearand a New Year full of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace 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of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace andfull of Peace and 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Wednesday December 16 2015 11 Happy Holidays The Board of Governors staff of Aurora College wish you all the joys of the holidays and a New Year filled with exciting educational experiences. Happy HolidaysHappy HolidaysHappy HolidaysHappy HolidaysHappy HolidaysHappy HolidaysHappy Holidays The Board of Governors staff of Aurora College wish you all the joys of the holidays and a New Year filled with exciting educational www.auroracollege.nt.ca Wednesday December 16 2015 13 Having a VERY MERRY Fort Smith Christmas Town of Fort Smith Holiday Information For additional information on events please contact Fort Smith Town Hall at 867 872-8400. RESCHEDULED OPERATIONS Garbage Pick-Up will be on Tuesdays and Thursdays December 22 24 29 31 2015. Pump-Outs and Water Delivery will be on the regularly scheduled days. TOWN HALL December 24 Open 830 am to 12 pm December 25 28 CLOSED January 1 CLOSED POOL December 24 26 CLOSED December 31 Open 630 am to 1pm January 1 CLOSED Please be advised of the following Town operational hours and closures during the holiday season LANDFILL December 24 Open 10 am to 2 pm December 25 28 CLOSED January 1st CLOSED RECREATION AND COMMUNITY CENTRE December 24 Open 6 am to 12 pm December 25 26 CLOSED January 1 CLOSED LIBRARY December 24 27 CLOSED December 28 30 Open 130 pm to 530 pm December 31 CLOSED January 1 CLOSED ARENA December 24 26 CLOSED January 1 CLOSED Spirit of giving alive and well in Fort Smith Santa arrived early in Fort Smith on Dec. 11 courtesy of Northwestern Air Lease. Kids of all ages had breakfast with Santa in Fort Smith Dec. 12 at the Northern Life Museum. PhotocourtesyofNWAL PhotobyDaliCarmichael Members of the Fort Smith volunteer Fire Department held their annual toy and food bank drive on Dec. 12. The goods were received and sorted at the Pentecostal Church. PhotobyDaliCarmichael 14 Wednesday December 16 2015 INDUSTRY TRAPPING By DALI CARMICHAEL Thetrapperinstructorsdeftmovementswere watched carefully by a quiet group of about 20 onlookers as he swiftly nailed the oval outer trim of a freshly skinned beaver pelt to a at board prepping it to dry and sell. This scene took place in Fort Smith on Dec. 9 and will be replicated as a beaver-trapping workshop - hosted by ENR and the Genuine MackenzieValleyFurprogramGMVF-travels to ve other locations through the South Slave and Dehcho regions. Mark Taylor the trapper relations manager with the Fur Harvesters Auction Inc. based in North Bay Ontario was giving the demonstration. Everyone was loud and talking before but as soon as Mark started skinning everyone juststoppedandpaidattentionsaidFrancois Rossouw a marketing manager with GMVF. Noviceandexperiencedtrappersalikecame outfortheeventtolearnsomeofthebestprac- ticesforsnaringskinningeshingandsending out beaver furs to be sold on the international market through the GMVF. Were here to promote better fur handling andtotellthetrapperswhattheindustrywants becauseitschangingandevolvingallthetime Taylor said. We want to give them an indica- tion of how to properly prepare hides for mar- ket plus its just to share some tips on how to catch some of the animals. Every year the two organizations travel to a select set of communities to run similar work- shops on a variety of animals. The idea is to show trappers different ways of doing things. Not that the way they do it is incorrect but the idea is to get more value for your fur and thats our job Rossouw said. I dothemarketinginternationally.Whateverwe takeouttothemarketplacehastolookthebest. You can always learn something new ob- served hunter Richard Mercredi one of the more seasoned attendees. My family has a trapline in Wood Buffalo National Park that we want to use it more this yearsaidCheyeannePauletteanENRofcer who sat in on the day-long class with his two young sons Ezeh and Kaiyus. I want to get these guys out there learning too. ForeachvarietyofanimaltheMVGFhasaset advancedrateitpaysoutperpeltfundedthrough a 1.5-million line of credit from the GNWT. Little nuances in the way a fur is prepared canmeanallthedifferencebetweencollecting 25 per beaver pelt - the rate set by the GMVF -andlosingthefundswhenaskinisdamaged. Send them leather to leather and fur to fur and I know its easier to roll them up and send them but you want to make sure you keep the pelt at Taylor said one of the many tips he offered throughout the day. UsuallyRossouwsaidabeaverpeltcanrun between15and30ontheinternationalmarket. Fur market hit hard by oil downturn Its especially important now for trappers to ensuretheirproductistopqualitysowhatthey can sell goes for top dollar. After several high- paying seasons the GMVF only managed to sell about 1500 beaver pelts last year which is not that much Rossouw said. Tensions between Russia and the Ukraine - two of the largest fur-buying markets interna- tionally-havehadanimpactonsaleshenoted ashasthisyearsoilbustandadownturninthe Chinese stock market. Chinaisprobablythelargestproducerofn- ished fur products and the largest buyer. They represent 80 per cent of the market Rossouw said.Youvegotthisstuffhappeningoutthere which directly affects us no matter what. Thebeautyoftheprogramisitactuallypro- tectsthetrapperinhardtimes.Rightnowwere advancing on fur and whatever the advance is itsguaranteed.Thetrapperwalksawaywithhis 25 for beaver and if it sells for 15 the govern- menteatsthedifferencethatshortfall.Westa- bilizethemarketforthem.Itsawayandmeans tolookafteraculturalactivityandkeeppeople activetoo.Ialwaysliketosayitsthelinktothe past the present and the future for Aboriginal people really it is. Fur trappers prepare for downturn with best practices Mark Taylor from Fur Harvesters Auction Inc. demonstrates how to esh and dry a beaver pelt at a workshop held in Fort Smith. PhotoDaliCarmichael Wednesday December 16 2015 15 ENVIRONMENT NATIONAL PARKS Notice is hereby given that Nomination Day is Monday January 11th 2016 and that nominations for the following office will be received at the locations set below between the hours of 830 a.m. and 1200 noon on Nomination Day. Location Address of Local Jurisdiction Office Ward 2 Fort Chipewyan Municipal Contact Office 101 Loutit Street Fort Chipewyan AB Fort MacKay Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo Office Fort MacKay AB located in the Fort McKay Mtis Group Ltd. Building Dated at Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo in the Province of Alberta this 16th day of December 2016. Darlene Soucy Returning Officer Nomination Papers may be picked up at the following locations during normal office hours or online at www.rmwb.caelections Fort Chipewyan Municipal Contact Office 101 Loutit Street Fort Chipewyan AB Jubilee Centre Front Counter Main Floor 9909 Franklin Avenue Fort McMurray AB Filing of Nomination All candidates running for the position of Councillor must submit completed nomination papers accompanied by the required deposit of 100. The nomination fee must be paid by cash certified cheque or money order. Note A nomination is not valid unless accompanied by the required fee and signed by at least five eligible voters. www.rmwb.ca Office Number of Vacancies Ward Councillor One 1 Two 2 Local Authorities Election Act Section 26 Local Jurisdiction Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo Province of Alberta NOTICE OF NOMINATION DAY 2016 Ward 2 By DALI CARMICHAEL As proponents behind the Thaidene Nene National Park reserve continue to push for the establishment of a protection on the East Arm of Great Slave Lake it seems that some users are most concerned about what limi- tations the park may put on recreational ac- tivities in the area. At a public consultation meeting held Dec. 9 Parks Canada asked for feedback from the public on their plans for estab- lishing and managing the park in addition to consulting the audience on boundaries proposed this past summer. The future of hunting and travel laws as well as the use of guns in the park was a major concern for many present. We engaged in this process from day one with the desire to protect a large chunk of our traditional territory from industrial development and Parks Can- adas legislation is the best legislation in the world for that said Steven Nitah chief negotiator for Lutsel Ke Dene First Nation LKDFN. Unfortunately it comes with other policies that dont always jive with what we desire. I think theres a new day and sunny ways are here. I think for parks and protected areas in northern Canada the policies and the regulations that are applied and that are available within the National Parks Act I believe can be plucked and picked to meet the needs of northerners. He said everyone should use the land as they have in the past. Dene law states that if youre on the land you have to have the ability to protect yourself so guns and animals that help in that protection is something that we en- courage and we represent at the negotiat- ing table. Proponents also addressed questions regarding the potential tourism oppor- tunities for the park of which there are many Nitah said including opportunities for studying the impacts of climate change within the park the establishment of a conservation economy for those living in Lutsel Ke as well as a renewed cultural tourism industry. All of these questions have been noted by Parks and put on the official record Nitah said. In January the GNWT began develop- ing a matrix of protected area designations and northern tools for the 33600 square- kilometre Thaidene Nene land withdrawal area including the East Arm and Artillery Lake regions. Following meetings between the GNWT Parks Canada LKDFN the NWT Metis Nation and other indigenous groups it was determined that a national park reserve would make up 14000 square-kilometres of that matrix. On July 29 the federal government an- nounced a proposed boundary for the na- tional park reserve launching formal con- sultations on the boundary. A second meeting is set to take place in Hay River some time in January. Those who could not make the meetings are encouraged to voice their opinions by heading to www.secure2.convio.netcpaws siteAdvocacycmddisplaypageUserAc tionid343. Public consultation on Thaidene Nene National Park A gathering point at Desnedhe Che the mouth of the Lockhart River at Artillery Lake in the proposed Thaidene Nene National Park in the eastern Northwest Territories. Filephoto Say it in 25 words or less for only 3.50 Extra words are 20 centseach.Businessclassifieds are 10 for 30 words and 25 centsforeach additionalword. E-mail your advertising to adsnorj.ca or fax it to 872-2754 or call 872-3000 ext. 26 FOR SALE FIREWOOD. Cus- tom cut sizes - split green dry bagged. Wood Gasification Outdoor wood boilers. Delivery from Fort Smith to Hay River Yellowknife. Contact Dave at 867 872-3435 or cell 872-0229 or email dhehnnorthwestel. net. UFN FORT SMITH CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING BLANKET CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Blanket advertising reaches all 122 weekly newspapers in Alberta and the NWT with a combined circulation of over a million readers. Call our Northern Journal sales desk at 867-872-3000ex.26fordetails. COMMUNITY TRADING POST If you operate a business and need affordable advertising call the Northern Journal. Find out how to have your business listed in our Service Directory. Call 867 872-3000 or email adsnorj.ca. Northern Journal Directory Get your name out there 16 Wednesday December 16 2015 Home Heating Oil For on-time or anytime delivery...call 100 Locally owned and operated 1 Breynat Street Fort Smith NT 872-4567 Petroleum Whispering Pines Cottages Serving you with 50 years experience Please Contact Sandra Robichaud PhoneFax 867 872-2906 - Cell 867 621-0254 85 Pine Crescent P.O. 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Expert Help 1-844- 453-5372. GETFREEVENDINGmachines. Can earn 100000. per year. All cash-locations provided. Protectedterritories.Interestfree nancing. Full details. Call now 1-866-668-6629.Websitewww. tcvend.com. GREATCANADIANDollarStore franchiseopportunitiesareavail- able in your area. Explore your future with a dollar store leader. Call today 1-877-388-0123 ext. 229 www.dollarstores.com. Career Training MEDICAL TRAINEES needed now Hospitals doctors ofces need certied medical ofce administrative staff No experi- ence needed We can get you trained Local job placement as- sistance available when training is completed. Call for program details 1-888-627-0297. HEALTHCARE DOCUMEN- TATION Specialists in huge demand. Employers prefer CanScribe graduates. A great work-from-homecareerContact us now to start your training day www.canscribe.com.1-800-466- 1535 infocanscribe.com. Coming Events THE LLOYDMINSTER EXHIBI- TIONS Pride of the Prairies Bull Show and Sale. March 6 - 7 2016. Traditional halter and pen format. Entry deadline January 5 2016. For more information www.lloydexh.com. 306-825- 5571 or email Sam sam lloydexh.com. Employment Opportunities WATKIN MOTORS FORD Ver- non BC immediately requires an experienced Ford Diesel Technician. Go to watkinmotors. com About us Employment to apply and review required qualications. JOURNALISTSGraphicArtists Marketing and more. Albertas weekly newspapers are looking for people like you. Post your resumeonline.Free.Visit awna. comfor-job-seekers. MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION In-demand career Employers have work-at-home positions available.Getonlinetrainingyou need from an employer-trusted program. Visit CareerStep.ca MT or 1-855-768-3362 to start training for your work-at-home career today Equipment For Sale A-CHEAP lowest prices steel shipping containers. Used 20 40 Seacans insulated 40 freezersSpecial2200.Wanted Professional wood carvers needed. 1-866-528-7108 www. rtccontainer.com. 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EMPLOYMENT TENDERS AND LEGAL NOTICES Wednesday December 16 2015 17 6.8103 in x 6.3125 in QUOTE OF THE WEEK LET YOUR VISION be world embracing rather than confined to your own selves. from the writings of the Bah Faith EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY Were hiring a Store Manager in our Fort Smith store Are you passionate about customer service Do you have a hands-on approach in leading and inspiring people Do you have great leadership skills Competitive salary benefits team based culture be valued Email your resume and references to joinourteamfields.ca or drop them off at the store 81 King Street. Please be sure to include the location and position. NOTICE OF TENDER Town of Fort Smith Animal Shelter Renovations Sealed Tenders plainly marked on the envelope Town of Fort Smith Animal Shelter Renovations will be received by the Town of Fort Smith 174 McDougal Road Fort Smith NT until 300 p.m. MST Friday January 8 2016. Project documents may be obtained from the Town of Fort Smith on December 14th 2015. A site meeting is scheduled for Thursday December 17th at 1330pm MST at the Animal Shelter. Attendance is mandatory for all interested bidders. Any inquiries may be addressed to Mitchel Heron C.E.T at Maskwa Engineering Ltd. Phone 867-872-2812 Fax 867-872-2813 Email mitch.heronmaskwaengineering.ca 12345 12345 3 wide version 3.75 wide version Diabetes Online Survey Reaching out to Canadians living with diabetes The Canadian Diabetes Association CDA and researchers from St. Michaels Hospital are looking for people living with diabetes type 1 type 2 gestational and prediabetes and caregivers to participant in an online survey. Your participation with help the CDA and researchers learn about your ex- perience with diabetes. All responses will be confidential and will help in- form the development of tools and resources for people living with diabetes. Each participant will be entered for a chance to win 100 cash 1 in 30 odds of winning. Complete the short survey by visiting httpfluidsurveys.comscda2015 Diabetes Online Survey Reaching out to Canadians living with diabetes The Canadian Diabetes Association CDA and researchers from St. Michaels Hospital are looking for people living with diabetes type 1 type 2 gestational and prediabetes and caregivers to participant in an online survey. Your participation with help the CDA and researchers learn about your experience with diabetes. All responses will be confidential and will help inform the development of tools and resources for people living with diabetes. Each participant will be entered for a chance to win 100 cash 1 in 30 odds of winning. Complete the short survey by visiting httpfluidsurveys.comscda2015 Advertising and marketing Book design Brochures posters Business cardsStationery Logo design Photography Promo material Signs Banners Stickers Magnets Wedding invitations Contact Cascade Graphics at 867 872-3000 or graphicsnorj.ca 207 McDougal Rd Fort Smith NT We offer a range of custom design services cascade graphics St. Josephs Cathedral Fort Smith Christmas Events Wednesday December 16 Community Christmas Carol Fest......700 pm Thursday December 24 Christmas Family Mass............................700 pm Carol Singing............................Begins at 640 pm Christmas Eve Mass............................... 1000 pm Friday December 25 Christmas Day Mass............................... 1100 am 18 Wednesday December 16 2015 ENVIRONMENT WILDLIFE SUMMIT SP EXPEDITION XTREME OFFER ENDS JANUARY 6 2016 GREAT FINANCING 3-YEARBUMPER-TO-BUMPER WARRANTY 2000 SAVE UP TO ON SELECT 2015 MODELS GET UP TO ON SELECT MODELS or GET UP TO 2015 Bombardier Recreational Products Inc. BRP. All rights reserved. and the BRP logo are trademarks of BRP or its affiliates. In the U.S.A. products are distributed by BRP US Inc. Offers valid in U.S.A. only at participating Ski-Doo dealers on new and unused 2015 and 2016 Ski-Doo snowmobiles excluding racing models and units sold under the Spring Fever promotion purchased delivered and registered between December 1 2015 and January 6 2016. The terms and conditions may vary depending on your state and these offers are subject to termination or change at any time without notice. See your Ski-Doo dealer for details. UP TO 3-YEAR BUMPER-TO-BUMPER WARRANTY Consumers will receive a 3-year BRP limited warranty on select Summit models and 2-year BRP limited warranty on other select models. Summit Sport 600 Carb Renegade Sport 600 Carb and MXZ Sport 600 Carb models are excluded from this offer. Subject to the exclusions limitations of liabilities and all other terms and conditions of BRPs standard limited warranty contract including without limitation the exclusions of damages caused by abuse abnormal use or neglect. See your participating Ski-Doo dealer for a copy of the BRP Limited Warranty. SAVE UP TO 2000 ON SELECT 2015 MODELS Eligible units are select new and unused 2015 Ski-Doo models. Rebate amount depends on the model purchased. While quantities last. GREAT FINANCING Low financing rates are available. Subject to credit approval. Approval and any rates and terms provided are based on credit worthiness. Multiple financing offers available. Other qualifications and restrictions may apply. Financing promotion void where prohibited. BRP is not responsible for any errors changes or actions related to the financing provided by the financial institutions. Offer may not be assigned traded sold or combined with any other offer unless expressly stated herein. Offer void where restricted or otherwise prohibited by law. BRP reserves the right at any time to discontinue or change specifications prices designs features models or equipment without incurring any obligation. Always consult your snowmobile dealer when selecting a snowmobile for your particular needs and carefully read and pay special attention to your Operators Guide Safety Video Safety Handbook and to the safety labelling on your snowmobile. Always ride responsibly and safely. Always wear appropriate clothing including a helmet. Always observe applicable local laws and regulations. Dont drink and drive. 1108156 Dealer Imprint Goes Here SUMMIT SP EXPEDITION XTREME OFFER ENDS JANUARY 6 2016 GREAT FINANCING 3-YEARBUMPER-TO-BUMPER WARRANTY 2000 SAVE UP TO ON SELECT 2015 MODELS GET UP TO ON SELECT MODELS or 2015 Bombardier Recreational Products Inc. BRP. All rights reserved. and the BRP logo are trademarks of BRP or its affiliates. In the U.S.A. products are distributed by BRP US Inc. Offers valid in U.S.A. only at participating Ski-Doo dealers on new and unused 2015 and 2016 Ski-Doo snowmobiles excluding racing models and units sold under the Spring Fever promotion purchased delivered and registered between December 1 2015 and January 6 2016. The terms and conditions may vary depending on your state and these offers are subject to termination or change at any time without notice. See your Ski-Doo dealer for details. UP TO 3-YEAR BUMPER-TO-BUMPER WARRANTY Consumers will receive a 3-year BRP limited warranty on select Summit models and 2-year BRP limited warranty on other select models. Summit Sport 600 Carb Renegade Sport 600 Carb and MXZ Sport 600 Carb models are excluded from this offer. Subject to the exclusions limitations of liabilities and all other terms and conditions of BRPs standard limited warranty contract including without limitation the exclusions of damages caused by abuse abnormal use or neglect. See your participating Ski-Doo dealer for a copy of the BRP Limited Warranty. SAVE UP TO 2000 ON SELECT 2015 MODELS Eligible units are select new and unused 2015 Ski-Doo models. Rebate amount depends on the model purchased. While quantities last. GREAT FINANCING Low financing rates are available. Subject to credit approval. Approval and any rates and terms provided are based on credit worthiness. Multiple financing offers available. Other qualifications and restrictions may apply. Financing promotion void where prohibited. BRP is not responsible for any errors changes or actions related to the financing provided by the financial institutions. Offer may not be assigned traded sold or combined with any other offer unless expressly stated herein. Offer void where restricted or otherwise prohibited by law. BRP reserves the right at any time to discontinue or change specifications prices designs features models or equipment without incurring any obligation. Always consult your snowmobile dealer when selecting a snowmobile for your particular needs and carefully read and pay special attention to your Operators Guide Safety Video Safety Handbook and to the safety labelling on your snowmobile. Always ride responsibly and safely. Always wear appropriate clothing including a helmet. Always observe applicable local laws and regulations. Dont drink and drive. 1108156 Dealer Imprint Goes Here Bombardier Recreational Products Inc. BRP. All rights reserved. and the BRP logo are trademarks of BRP or its affiliates. Offers valid in Canada only at participating Ski-Doo dealers located in Newfoundland and or Prince Edward Island New Brunswick Nova Scotia Quebec and Ontario on new and unused 2015 and 2016 Ski-Doo snowmobiles excluding racing models and units sold under the Spring Fever promotion purchased d and registered between December 1 2015 and January 6 2016. The terms and conditions may vary depending on your province and these offers are subject to termination or change at any time without notice. See your dealer for details. UP TO 3-YEAR BUMPER-TO-BUMPER WARRANTY Consumers will receive a 3-year BRP limited warranty on select Summit models and 2-year BRP limited warranty on other select models. Summit Sport rb Renegade Sport 600 Carb and MXZ Sport 600 Carb models are excluded from this offer. Subject to the exclusions limitations of liabilities and all other terms and conditions of BRPs standard limited warranty contract ng without limitation the exclusions of damages caused by abuse abnormal use or neglect. See your participating Ski-Doo dealer for a copy of the BRP Limited Warranty. SAVE UP TO 2000 ON SELECT 2015 MODELS units are select new and unused 2015 Ski-Doo models. Rebate amount depends on the model purchased. While quantities last. GREAT FINANCING Subject to credit approval by the participating financial institution not icants will qualify. Offer may not be assigned traded sold or combined with any other offer unless expressly stated herein. Offer void where restricted or otherwise prohibited by law. BRP reserves the right at any time to inue or change specifications prices designs features models or equipment without incurring any obligation. Always consult your snowmobile dealer when selecting a snowmobile for your particular needs and carefully d pay special attention to your Operators Guide Safety Video Safety Handbook and to the safety labelling on your snowmobile. Always ride responsibly and safely. Always wear appropriate clothing including a helmet. observe applicable local laws and regulations. Dont drink and drive. 0 NEGADE ADRENALINE OFFER ENDS JANUARY 6 2016 GREAT FINANCING 3-YEARBUMPER-TO-BUMPER WARRANTY 2000 SAVE UP TO ON SELECT 2015 MODELS GET UP TO ON SELECT MODELS or Dealer Imprint Goes Here 926 MACKENZIE HIGHWAY HAY RIVER NT 867-874-2771 Toll Free 1-866-327-0717 www.monsterrec.com CONTEST RULES 1. Entries will consist of writing your name and phone number on the back of a receipt from local participating retailers in the amount of 30.00 or more and placing this in a designated ballot box. 2. Ballot boxes will be placed at participating retailers and emptied weekly for the draw. 3. There will be FIVE WEEKLY DRAWS with the first draw on November 18 for prizes donated by local businesses. 4. The GRAND PRIZE of two tickets to Edmonton will be drawn from all of the weekly entries on December 23. 5. Winners will be notified by phone and prize winners will be posted on Facebook. 6. Chamber Executive members are not eligible for prizes. Thank you to the following businesses for their kind donation of prizes for the Shop Local Campaign THEBACHA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Northern Stores Kaesers Stores TDC Wallys Drugs Bank of Montreal Hobart and Mum Shear FunStreet Treats Northwestern Air Lease Please remember that each purchase from a local business provides employment for residents as well as offering services for residents and visitors alike. By CRAIG GILBERT Flying 15000 kilometres from a temperate coastal cli- mate to the most unforgiving placeontheplanet20-some- thing graduate student Ian Stirling wanted it bad. It was almost 50 years ago that the man who would be- come Dr. Stirling a world- renowned authority on polar bears and polar ice-breeding seals the rst researcher to connect the decline of a polar bear subpopulation and cli- mate warming could not nd ajobinhiseldinCanada.So with an M.Sc from the Uni- versityofBritishColumbiaoff he went to the bottom of the earth a virtual desert where temperatures colder than -91C have been recorded to study the population ecology of Weddell seals. In doing so he earned his PhD from the Canterbury University in Christchurch New Zealand in 1969 before returning to Canadain1970whenhetook the helm of the Polar Bear Project at Environment Can- adas Canadian Wildlife Ser- vice a position he held until 2007 he remains involved as an emeritus scientist. It all came full circle when on Dec. 9 Stirling received the 50000 Weston Family Prize for Lifetime Achieve- ment in Northern Research from the W. Gareld Weston Foundation at the ArcticNet annual scientic meeting in Vancouver. The conference brought together 650 leading Arctic researchers students indig- enous leaders policy makers northern community mem- bers and private sector rep- resentatives to address the numerous environmental social economical and politi- cal challenges and opportu- nities that are emerging from climate change and modern- ization in the Arctic. Its a little overwhelming Stirling told the Journal last week. Most scientists dont ever think of these things but Ive always felt talking to the public and the media or schools was really impor- tant. I usually try and steer the conversation away from myself to the polar bears or the seals or the walruses or whatever it is the reporter happened to be interested in because those are the things that are important in the big picture. In laymans terms Stirling has been studying the popu- lation dynamics and ecology of polar bears in relation to seals which they eat to live and changes in sea ice which they need to be able to hunt. Stirlingestimatesthatabout half of the polar bear popu- lation around the circumpo- lar Arctic could disappear by 2050 to 2060 if climate warming continues as is cur- rently projected with the last survivorsexpectedtobeinthe northern Canadian Arctic is- landsandGreenland.Ofthe19 differentpolarbearsubpopu- lations around the world all but six are in Canada. When climate starts to warm and ice starts to melt and starts affecting the re- production and survival of seals and access by bears to the seals in particular you start seeing some very large changes Stirling explained. In the NWT youre right on the edge of where the ef- fectsaregettingreallysigni- cant.Climatechangeisahuge globalproblemofcoursebut the rate of climate change is double in the Arctic what it is everywhere else. It has ef- fects on the way of life of all the people that live there in absolutely profound ways. LookatatownlikeTuk.Every timetheresamajorstormthey lose 10 or 20 feet of the shore- front.Theyveactuallymoved a couple of villages in Alaska that were on the lost-shore is- lands and theyre going to be moving some more at a cost of tens or hundreds of mil- lionsofdollars.Itsnotcheap. A legacy of learning Stirling who lives with his wife and children in Edmon- tonisrankedbyhiscolleagues as one of the best researchers in the eld of marine mam- mal ecology according to the Weston Foundation. Over the last 50 years he has authored or co-authored more than 300 scientific articles and published ve non-technical books for the general public. Dr. Stirlings rigorous re- searchhasledtondingsthat are signicant to the preser- vation and management of ArcticmarinemammalsGe- ordie Dalglish director of the WestonFoundationandchair of its Northern Committee said.Wearedeeplyhonoured to award him in recognition of his signicant contribu- tion to our understanding of Canadas North. His most cherished legacy isthegenerationsofscientists he helped train as an adjunct professor at the University of Albertafrom1979on.Thejob was unpaid but he accepted it so he could involve young Canadian students and give them the opportunity to do Arctic research in the eld. Asaneducatorandamen- tor Dr. Stirling has inspired early-career scholars from undergraduate and graduate students to postdoctoral fel- lows to pursue and persevere innorthernresearchAssoci- ationofCanadianUniversities forNorthernStudiespresident Monique Bernier said. Many of his former students now live in the North where they occupy positions as govern- ment biologists or managers. He is highly respected in the Northduetohisconsideration of indigenous knowledge his support for co-management with northern communities and his role as an advocate for the Arctic. Stirling credits the Weston Foundation for taking a big step forward in 2007 and funding a range of new schol- arshipsforstudentsresearch projects and conferences like the one in Vancouver where he received his award. Maybe one of the most important of any legacies I might be leaving is the num- ber of students Ive trained he said. It would be hard to nd anything that was much morerewardingthanthat.Its sortoflikewatchingyourown kids be successful. For Stirling now 74 fresh eyesandhungrymindsareal- wayswelcomeonthefrontier. If a good student isnt hav- inganewideaeveryotherday orsothentheyrenotthinking about stuff enough Stirling said. One of the things I al- ways found with having good students around is that I was never short of things to think about. It was really exciting. Legacy award for every polar bears best friend Dr. Ian Stirling has been recognized for decades of research on polar bears and the Arctic with a lifetime achievement award. PhotocourtesyofIanStirling Wednesday December 16 2015 19 SPORTS ARCTIC WINTER GAMES By DALI CARMICHAEL Enthusiasmforthe2016ArcticWinterGames reached a peak in the NWT last weekend as athletes traveled to the North and South Slave Regionsforthefirstroundoftryoutsforthein- ternationalmulti-sporttournamentsettotake place Mar. 6 to 11 2016. Futsal volleyball and bantam hockey play- ers as well as cross country skiers headed to Yellowknife to show their stuff with dreams of traveling to the games in Nuuk Greenland driving their efforts. MeanwhilealittlefarthersouthinHayRiver biathletesonskisandsnowshoestrudgedtheir way through the Hay River Cross Country Ski Club Nordic Centre. Simultaneouslybasketballplayerspracticed theirlayupsdowntheroadhopingtheirmoves would land them a spot on the team. A few hours farther down the road in Fort Smith girls hockey players hit the ice of the towns gleaming refurbished arena. Thenextroundoftryoutswilltakeplacefrom Jan.14to16withArcticsportsandsnowshoeing trials in Inuvik wrestling in Hay River table tennis in Fort Providence Dene games in Fort Smith and badminton and snowboarding try- outs in Yellowknife. NWT cultural delegates named Inadditiontotheplethoraofathletescoaches chaperones and mission staff the NWT will also be represented in Nuuk with cultural per- formingdelegatesselectedbySportNorthear- lier this month. AnneandElizabethThomasandSophieand GraceClarkmakeuptheDoubleTrebleFiddlers twosetsoftwinsfromYellowknifewhoplaytra- ditional fiddle tunes. The lifelong friends have been playing fiddle together since they were eight years old. Performer Tiffany Ayalik of Yellowknife will co-chaperone and work with the NWT youth performersduringaworkshopprograminNuuk. DuringthegamestheTeamNWTperform- ers will present and collaborate with other cultural delegations at the Katuaq Cultural Centre among other venues. Team NWT looks for the best in 2016 AWG trials PhotocourtesyoftheHayRiverSkiClub PhotoDaliCarmichaelPhotocourtesyofTeamNWT PhotocourtesyoftheNWTSoccerAssociation Girls hockey tryouts took place at the newly renovated arena in Fort Smith.Skiiers stage during Arctic Winter Games trials last weekend. Billy Lloyd Prodromidis from Fort McPherson gives it his all at the snowshoe biathlon trials in Hay River. Yellowknifes Cole Clinton and Behchokos Ahri Ekendia go head to head at the futsal tryouts. SPORTS HOCKEY 20 Wednesday December 16 2015 By JOHN LYNCH Fort Smiths Shaun MacPherson and the Mount Royal University Cougars are continu- ing to grow and even better times lie ahead after Christmas. The six-foot 200-pound defenceman cur- rently has two assists in 16 games with the Cougars so far this season. The team has really showed a lot of poten- tial in the last five or six games MacPher- son said. We should be in great shape for the second half. MacPherson signed with Mount Royal last spring after finishing his junior career as captain of the Kindersley Klippers of the Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League SJHL. Last season he had 10 goals and 26 assists in 52 games and was widely re- garded as one of the best defencemen in the SJHL in 2014-15. The Cougars finished their pre-Christmas schedule with a win and a loss over the na- tions number one-ranked University of Sas- katchewan Huskies in Saskatoon. They lost 4-2 to the Huskies Nov. 27 but won 5-3 the following evening. Coach Bertrum Gilling has even higher hopes for the remainder of the season. Last year the team knocked off the Huskies in the first round of the playoffs before los- ing to the University of Calgary in the sec- ond round. Last year was my first year coaching the team and I only had a window of about a month to recruit for 2015-16 he said. We are still in the development stages and things are going well right now and hopefully will continue to. Mount Royal currently sits in third place in the Canada West Universities Athletic Association mens ice hockey standings MacPherson adds speed to Mount Royal defence with a 9-5-0-2 record. The other teams in the conference include entries from the Universities of British Columbia Manitoba Regina Calgary Lethbridge and Alberta. We went out last season looking to im- prove mobility with our defence and weve got that with Shaun he said. He has played in every game and in different situations. His growth will continue and he has a bright fu- ture playing here. MacPherson was one of seven players Gill- ing recruited for this season. He brings to the team what we need...that speed makes plays great transition game Gilling said. The whole team is playing up to expectations and Im obviously happy with that. With the exception of two home losses to the Huskies at the beginning of November the team won five and lost only one game on the road. The last home game on Nov. 20 was a 3-1 win over the Calgary Dinos. I feel everyone has adjusted pretty well MacPherson said of the rookies on the team including himself. It is a lot tougher here in the corners and the play- ers are bigger. Mount Royal sees its next action January 8-9 at the University of Lethbridge taking on the Pronghorns. Fort Smith native Shaun MacPherson has two assists in 16 games with his new team the Mount Royal University Cougars who are currently third in the west. PhotocourtesyofMountRoyalUniversity It is a lot tougher here in the corners and the players are bigger. Shaun MacPherson the NORTHS full service bureau cascade graphics Contact Cascade Graphics at 867 872-3000 or graphicsnorj.ca 207 McDougal Rd Fort Smith NT Photocopying - Up to 11 x 17 colour and black white Faxing - SendingReceiving Scanning Document Printing CDDVD Writing ID Photos for treaty cards FAC Cerlox Binding and Laminating Personalized Greeting Cards WeddingSpecial Occasion Invitations Business Cards Letterhead Newsletters Resumes and Brochures Personalized Promotional Material Mugs Pens Hats Mouse Pads etc. printing All printing includes professional colour correction and retouching if necessary. restoration Need an old or damaged photograph restored Old prints can be scanned and preserved. large format Poster and Banner printing available. Printing up to 34 wide Reprint any photo from the Northern Journal. full service copy centre call for a quote full service photo printing